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Topic: Atmega328 UNO Bootloader, Led not blinking (Read 3209 times) previous topic - next topic

SnoW

Jun 07, 2011, 10:57 pm Last Edit: Jun 07, 2011, 11:00 pm by SnoW Reason: 1
I recently purchased atmega328 with UNO bootloader installed. After placing it on my breadboard I powered it up but the led ( atmega pin 19 ) is not blinking. I've checked everything twice with no luck. Now I am wondering that there is something wrong with the bootloader or the chip itself. I'm looking for further assistance what could be wrong and providing an image of my setup.


Thank you in advance.

mmcp42

have you tried uploading a sketch to it?
did that work?
there are only 10 types of people
them that understands binary
and them that doesn't

SnoW

Thank you for your support. The chip is alive so I am still betting the bootloader. I tried to upload a sketch with following output.

Code: [Select]
Binary sketch size: 1018 bytes (of a 32256 byte maximum)
C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\arduino-0022\hardware/tools/avr/bin/avrdude -CC:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\arduino-0022\hardware/tools/avr/etc/avrdude.conf -v -v -v -v -patmega328p -cstk500v1 -P\\.\COM2 -b115200 -D -Uflash:w:C:\Users\MyUser\AppData\Local\Temp\build7843312685296780230.tmp\Blink2.cpp.hex:i

avrdude: Version 5.4-arduino, compiled on Oct 11 2007 at 19:12:32
         Copyright (c) 2000-2005 Brian Dean, http://www.bdmicro.com/

         System wide configuration file is "C:\Program Files (x86)\Arduino\arduino-0022\hardware/tools/avr/etc/avrdude.conf"

         Using Port            : \\.\COM2
         Using Programmer      : stk500v1
         Overriding Baud Rate  : 115200
avrdude: ser_open(): setting dtr
avrdude: Send: 0 [30]   [20]
avrdude: Send: 0 [30]   [20]
avrdude: Send: 0 [30]   [20]
avrdude: Recv:
avrdude: stk500_getsync(): not in sync: resp=0x00
avrdude: Send: Q [51]   [20]
avrdude: Recv:
avrdude: stk500_disable(): protocol error, expect=0x14, resp=0x51

avrdude done.  Thank you.



JimG

Do you have a black jumper wire shorting pins 7 (Vcc) and 8 (GND)?  Hard to tell for sure, but it looks like it in the photo.  This would be a bad thing.

Other suggestion is to put a 0.1uF ceramic capacitor across 7 - 8.

Jim

SnoW

Thank you, Jim.

Do you have a black jumper wire shorting pins 7 (Vcc) and 8 (GND)?  Hard to tell for sure, but it looks like it in the photo.  This would be a bad thing.

This would be really alarming indeed. Somehow that is not the case. Here is the board from another angle.

Other suggestion is to put a 0.1uF ceramic capacitor across 7 - 8.

Could you specify this a little more? I am not sure if you noted but I already have a 0.1uF capacitor across ground and vcc ( near the voltage regulator ). Because of the very minimal resistance of jumper wires I cannot imagine it would do any difference across those exact pins. Or is there a need to use two capacitors? I can also assure I do not have that high capacitance in ceramic capacitors.

JimG

I saw the caps at the Vr, but assumed they were electrolytics of much higher value. I keep 0.1uF MLCC's handy in my box of jumper wires and use them as close as possible to supply pins of IC's, especially when a breadboard circuit isn't working for unknown reasons.

Jim

SnoW

#6
Jun 09, 2011, 02:05 pm Last Edit: Jun 09, 2011, 02:15 pm by SnoW Reason: 1

I saw the caps at the Vr, but assumed they were electrolytics of much higher value. I keep 0.1uF MLCC's handy in my box of jumper wires and use them as close as possible to supply pins of IC's, especially when a breadboard circuit isn't working for unknown reasons.

Jim


Thank you, Jim, you are absolutely right, my estimation skills are not as good as they used to be, though they never were in capacitance I guess. They are indeed higher value of 10uF, 0.1uF would not be as good as a decoupling capacitor would it. Could you explain further what is the advantage of the capacitor across the pins, I will try that immediately.

Edit: The capacitor does not seem to affect to anything.

JimG

Hi, SnoW -

I'm sorry the 0.1uF cap didn't help.  It was a long shot, I know, but it has fixed mysterious problems for me in the past.

I don't know if using a 0.1uF cap at IC supply pins is just rule of thumb or if it can be demonstrated to be the right value.  I just know that many (most?) designs incorporate them.  Take a look at the schematics for the Uno and the Duemilanove and you will see them.

Jim

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