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Author Topic: Altitude from atmospheric pressure  (Read 9797 times)
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Dallas, Texas
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I have a couple of small quibbles with gerg's post:

- when he says flight levels start at FL18 he really meant FL180 (approx. 18000 feet)
- but, while that is the case in US airspace, it is by no means universal. Here in UK the Transition Altitude (the level at which you switch between altitude above mean sea level and Flight Levels) is between 3000ft and 6000ft depending on where you are.

Yes, I was speaking to US FAA rules.

I didn't know about the UK FL rule. What's the logic behind that? Or did I ask a trick question?  smiley-grin
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What's the logic behind that? Or did I ask a trick question?
Our highest mountains are around 4400ft so we don't need such to use a TA anything like as high as 18000ft. A lower TA reduces the amount of radio bandwidth needed to pass altimeter settings to pilots. However, I don't think there is much logic behind having different TAs in different parts of UK airspace. There is a current proposal for a common TA throughout Europe.
« Last Edit: August 22, 2011, 03:57:22 pm by dc42 » Logged

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