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Topic: Regression between uno and uno R2 VALIDATED. HARDWARE PROBLEM CONFIRMED (Read 27 times) previous topic - next topic

mmcp42


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would the same apply to FT232RL driven chips?

No.  But none of those seem to be exhibiting the problem...


can you explain why they wouldn't have the same problem?
there are only 10 types of people
them that understands binary
and them that doesn't

robert rozee

#61
Jun 24, 2011, 01:54 pm Last Edit: Jun 24, 2011, 02:45 pm by robert rozee Reason: 1


Quote
would the same apply to FT232RL driven chips?

No.  But none of those seem to be exhibiting the problem...

can you explain why they wouldn't have the same problem?


have a look back at reply #53 from retrolefty (and the following couple of messages). he saw some aberrant behaviour from an Arduino board that had an FT232 fitted, it just took a little more digging to expose it. so the problem is not exclusive to the UNO, but in the case of the UNO R2 more obvious in its manifestation.

retrolefty

#62
Jun 24, 2011, 07:19 pm Last Edit: Jun 24, 2011, 07:40 pm by retrolefty Reason: 1
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No.  But none of those seem to be exhibiting the problem...


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he saw some aberrant behaviour from an Arduino board that had an FT232 fitted, it just took a little more digging to expose it. so the problem is not exclusive to the UNO, but in the case of the UNO R2 more obvious in its manifestation.


If you read back over my prior posts you will see that I could consistently make the 328 chip power up into some kind of 'locked-up' condition, by just by having a 4.7k pull-up resistor wired to pin 4 and plugging the board into the PC usb and then a PC terminal program was opened. The PC would report a valid USB connection being established, but the sketch (the simple serial loopback test) would NOT start automatically. The symptom would not be present if the pull-up resistor is removed and the testing redone. So it takes a combination of starting with a inital power-up of the board and then opening some application that attempts to auto-reset the board, it fails on first attempt and only a manually forced auto-reset or a manual button reset clears the condition. Without the pull-up or with a diode installed the problem can't be recreated.

This was on a bog standard 'official' Arduino 2009 board using a FTDI chip. Pressing the manual reset button would successfully restart the sketch (or generating a DTR on signal would also 'un-lock' the board) without having to quit the PC serial terminal application.


 A diode is a simple and effective fix, but how to get that info out to the arduino community at large (both users and manufacturers) and having to consider this kind of a possible failure mode when trying to help others having weird unexplainable/illogical problems that may or may not be related to this failure mode, will I suspect be a challenge for a long time to come.

It's kind of like the 'lost my bootloader' reports we use to get frequently in the past. Reburning the bootloader would often get the user back in business, but I don't recall anyone ever being able to recreate a lost bootloader condition on purpose by something written in a sketch and uploaded?  


Lefty  

foubarre

First words for some time on the subject. Now that the problem is confirmed, validated, checked and a solution has been found, what is the next step?
I, for sure, want next boards i'll purchase not to exhibit this problem and i would hate having to solder diods on each and every of them.

This situation pours some pretty cold water on heat and excitation that comes out of the arduino project. Hardware is open, everything is nice and fun but when things derail it seems that there is no-one to handle them.
Did the creators finally turned into carton box pushers and only get interested in making money out of the project?
This is pretty far from how the other open communities react. In fact, the lack of reaction is the most disturbing problem to my eyes.

How do we make sure this problem is taken in account seriously? I would like the arduino team to communicate on this.

Massimo Banzi

hello foubarre

Consider that there are thousands of topics on this forum, it's impossible for us to be able to track all of them but on the website there are instructions on how to get in touch with us quickly (i.e. email team (at) arduino.cc or through twitter like you did)

email us a summary of the problem and we'll take immediate action if needed.

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Did the creators finally turned into carton box pushers and only get interested in making money out of the project?

I think this is a particularly unfair statement. We're always  responsive when there are issues and we've always adhered to our open source principles even when we could have made an easy buck......

m

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