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Author Topic: Various whinging upon the expiration of my hard drive.  (Read 828 times)
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Well, it happens. It's just a bigger PITA when it's the system drive. I'm now running Ubuntu from a live CD, and was able to repair it with fsck, and now have a monster tar command running to back things up to external, via USB. It's kinda slow.  smiley-yell Got the new Hitachi 500GB drive on hand, and I'm hoping once the backup is finished, I can continue to run on the existing drive until the weekend. Wasn't in my plans to do a fresh install this weekend, but them's the breaks. (I might try just moving the system, before I do that.)

Thing is, I have already promised myself to ditch Ubuntu and find a distro which isn't hell-bent on pulling the rug out from under all the things I already know how to do, and make me deal with yet another batch of newfangled desktop interface crap. Well, I already switched back to using Fvwm instead of Gnome or KDE, so some of it I never see anyway. And I really like the Debian package management system. But it seems as if most of the more leading-edge distros are based on Ubuntu these days.

So, I'm sitting here wondering about trying Slackware. (No, I don't want to run an RPM-based system.) Any issues anyone is aware of using Arduino tools with it?
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Www.spinrite.com has saved about 3 drives personally. Also just run it once in a while for maintenance.
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I remember Spinrite from back in the DOS days. Too bad it isn't GPL. For $89, I can buy a lot of HD as well.
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For $89, I can buy a lot of HD as well.
But not your data.

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I'm sitting here wondering about trying Slackware.
I used Slackware back when it was new.  Eventually I moved on to Gentoo.
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Well, it happens. It's just a bigger PITA when it's the system drive. I'm now running Ubuntu from a live CD, and was able to repair it with fsck, and now have a monster tar command running to back things up to external, via USB. It's kinda slow.  smiley-yell Got the new Hitachi 500GB drive on hand, and I'm hoping once the backup is finished, I can continue to run on the existing drive until the weekend. Wasn't in my plans to do a fresh install this weekend, but them's the breaks. (I might try just moving the system, before I do that.)

Thing is, I have already promised myself to ditch Ubuntu and find a distro which isn't hell-bent on pulling the rug out from under all the things I already know how to do, and make me deal with yet another batch of newfangled desktop interface crap. Well, I already switched back to using Fvwm instead of Gnome or KDE, so some of it I never see anyway. And I really like the Debian package management system. But it seems as if most of the more leading-edge distros are based on Ubuntu these days.

So, I'm sitting here wondering about trying Slackware. (No, I don't want to run an RPM-based system.) Any issues anyone is aware of using Arduino tools with it?

Still using Ubuntu here (10.04) - and I feel your hard drive "loss" pain (I had something similar to that happen on a file server running FreeNAS - I ended up migrating to a DLink DNS-321 after I recovered the data). One time I was forced to do an upgrade because my motherboard died, and I had been running this old board, processor, and ram for so long, I couldn't find a mobo at the local Fry's that would take any of it, so I had to do a -complete- system upgrade, including a new drive (couldn't find a mobo with PATA), new memory, new CPU, the works. But - the chipset was recognized by the distro I was running at the time (Debian Woody), and the new version of Debian wasn't out - so I ended up moving to Mandrake just because it had the support for the chipset.

Yeah - I feel your pain - it really sucks. I'm sorry to hear about it, but at least it sounds like you're able to recover...

Good luck! smiley
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Have a look at clonezilla and just copy the whole drive over to the new one.
Doesnt matter if the new drive is larger just expand the partition after the transfer.

I think my next Ubuntu upgrade will be either Xubuntu or Lubunto.
Still get the great install and hardware support out of the box but no Unity front end.
I dont like the new interfaces even my netbook running ubuntu netbook remix has standard gnome on the desktop.

Gordon
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For $89, I can buy a lot of HD as well.
But not your data.

Well, that's what backups are for. Last time I moved to a new HD, I got lax about those. On my list for this weekend though. Knock on wood, but the only time I've ever lost data was completely my fault. Fortunately, it wasn't anything critical.

Also on my list is to get Smartmontools doing regular checks. I used to do that too.

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I'm sitting here wondering about trying Slackware.
I used Slackware back when it was new.  Eventually I moved on to Gentoo.

I was intrigued by Gentoo when it first came out. Back then, I was doing odd things like compiling Gnome from CVS, and compiling my own kernels, so a full-on build-it distro had more appeal, since I was already doing a lot of that anyway. Though the thought of how long it might take to re-build when something like glibc updates is a bit daunting. (And yes, a new glibc shouldn't, except in rare cases, require a complete rebuild.) I might still give it a go, if I decide I don't like Slack. Sidux (now renamed to something I don't recall) is a possibility too.


Yeah - I feel your pain - it really sucks. I'm sorry to hear about it, but at least it sounds like you're able to recover...

Good luck! smiley

Yep, been there, done that. Of course, in my past, it was more like, "Oh cool, an excuse to build a faster machine!" I really want a RAID in a NAS box. Not in the budget for this year, though. smiley-sad


Have a look at clonezilla and just copy the whole drive over to the new one.
Doesnt matter if the new drive is larger just expand the partition after the transfer.


I've read about Clonezilla. Been looking for an excuse to try it out. Does it copy the UUID? (Relevant to grub stanzas.)

FWIW, I think the problem is heat. Somewhat surprising given the airflow I have in the box, but one fan is a bit sluggish (and in theory, I shouldn't even need it). I had 2 drives unrecognized earlier today, which came back fine after I opened up the case and blew out the dust. Kinda odd, because I've seen much dirtier PCs running without any apparent trouble. However, getting my Uno to turn on the AC has moved up in my priority list. I sure wish I knew of someplace in the Denver area where I could just go pick up an SSR.

Thanks for your comments folks. I'm hoping by the end of the weekend I'll by dual booting my existing system along with Slackware to try out.
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Thing is, I have already promised myself to ditch Ubuntu and find a distro which isn't hell-bent on pulling the rug out from under all the things I already know how to do, and make me deal with yet another batch of newfangled desktop interface crap.
I dunno if its the distro, so much as it is the desktop environment developers.

I can certainly sympathize with your complaints:  I'm a big fan of KDE 3, having used it for almost 10 years,  and the the little I've seen of KDE4 is distinctly unimpressive.  I see change for its own sake,  and not for the better (by my tastes).   However,  people in the Ubuntu project have put KDE3 on Lucid (the latest long-term-supported version), and the relatively-stable Gnome is officially supported,  so it's a little unfair to say that they're "hell-bent" on forcing change on you.

The reason that so many modern distros are derived from Ubuntu is simple: they're doing it right.  A solid Debian foundation,  with (usually) well-thought-out additions,  and a lot of hard work to make sure everything works well.  They also have a large user community that (much like Arduino's) does a good job of filling niche needs (like Xubuntu,  for people who want a lighter-weight GUI).

Slackware was great back in the days when 16 megs of RAM made you a "power user",  but it doesn't make much sense these days.  Even the late-90s PCs I use for embedded work run Debian.  I used to admin IBM mainframes back in the 1970s,  and I would never go back to the days when your system maintenance tools didn't automatically check and manage dependencies for you.

If you want to limit yourself to fvwm (which I wouldn't: my philosophy for my "tool" systems is that the software is supposed to make things easy for me,  not the hardware),  there's official community documentation (as well as quite a few google hits for forum postings and other web resources) to make it easy for you.   Switching distros when you've got one as good as Ubuntu would be throwing out the baby with the bathwater.
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Thing is, I have already promised myself to ditch Ubuntu and find a distro which isn't hell-bent on pulling the rug out from under all the things I already know how to do, and make me deal with yet another batch of newfangled desktop interface crap.
I dunno if its the distro, so much as it is the desktop environment developers.

Well, they're certainly doing their share, but Canonical is a driver. And they're the source of Unity. Not that I'm praising Gnome shell (or condemning it -- since I haven't seen it).

I can certainly sympathize with your complaints:  I'm a big fan of KDE 3, having used it for almost 10 years,

KDE is what got me away from Fvwm in the first place. It was nice while it lasted

and the the little I've seen of KDE4 is distinctly unimpressive.

And that's what got me back to using Fvwm.

so it's a little unfair to say that they're "hell-bent" on forcing change on you.

Oh, it isn't just the desktop interface. Here's one example: when I "upgraded" to 9.10, the upgrade removed the extra fonts I'd installed. Why do that on an upgrade? It isn't as if the presence of several .ttf files is going to blow up the new version of X. Then there's upstart, which is a fine thing if you're booting your system frequently, I guess. My system would run fine with good old SysV init, which I already know how to manage. And NetWorkManager, which insists on trying to start the wireless supplicant every 10 minutes, on my desktop system which has no wireless interface. I finally got rid of that. These are just a few examples.

The reason that so many modern distros are derived from Ubuntu is simple: they're doing it right.

Some things, yes.

Slackware was great back in the days when 16 megs of RAM made you a "power user",  but it doesn't make much sense these days.  Even the late-90s PCs I use for embedded work run Debian.  I used to admin IBM mainframes back in the 1970s,  and I would never go back to the days when your system maintenance tools didn't automatically check and manage dependencies for you.

I have nothing against good package managers, which is why I'd like to stay with something Debian-style.

If you want to limit yourself to fvwm

Fvwm is certainly not limiting for me. Hey, I can actually edit my .fvwmrc file, and find dox on exactly how to do it. Can you say the same for Gnome? Years ago, I wasted a lot of time working on getting my .gtkrc file set up to my taste -- never got there. The documentation sucks. And Gnome stuffs some config data in Gconf, some in other places. You can't find it all without a lot of work, and find documenation on it? Bah! When I switched back to Fvwm, my old .fvwmrc file was 90% still usable, and the supplied config upgrade script told me what parts were deprecated or invalid. I suppose if I wanted my windows to jiggle during desktop switches, Fvwm might be limiting.

 (which I wouldn't: my philosophy for my "tool" systems is that the software is supposed to make things easy for me,  not the hardware)

Well, now we're talking about something different, but yet again, a lot of this new stuff isn't making my life easier. When methods I know, which used to work, don't anymore, how is that "easier"? I have nothing against hardware abstraction. But I dislike byzantine XML files for configuring things.

there's official community documentation (as well as quite a few google hits for forum postings and other web resources) to make it easy for you.

Oh, sometimes. These days, finding an actual answer for an error message, using a web search, is more likely to come up with an steaming plethora of the same question, mirrored over and over, in multiple places, as it is to come up with useful debugging procedures.

Switching distros when you've got one as good as Ubuntu would be throwing out the baby with the bathwater.

Well, "good" is in the eye of the beholder, eh?  smiley-razz  smiley-mr-green

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I sure wish I knew of someplace in the Denver area where I could just go pick up an SSR.

Well, turns out there is. JB Saunders Company, at about 55th and Valmont, on Sterling Circle. Haven't driven up there yet, but I assume they have SSRs.
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