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Topic: Noob question about X10 (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

StErMi

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I control my whole house through X10 with Arduino and it works fine - for me. I would never consider it "rock solid" however, but I don't need it to be.


Why not?

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The "1/2 house" problem was solved for me with a $14 repeater/phase coupler. As for dimmable CFLs I've yet to find a decent CFL that works with any standard dimmer.


I don't get what does "1/2 house" means for you. Can you describe that problem?

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Having said this, I never recommend X10 to 220V countries. The modules are 4X more expensive, so the "not rock solid but cheep" rule doesn't apply.


They cost at least 30euro <.< What can you advice me for 220V countries?

retrolefty

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I don't get what does "1/2 house" means for you. Can you describe that problem?


X10 uses a signaling method called 'controlled carrier' that sends and receives commands over the AC power wires. Most homes here in the US use a 240 'split phase' wiring method where there are two separate 120volt buses on the main service panel that split up the individual house 120v circuits between the two buses, and a X10 controller and devices installed on one 120v buss can't normally communicate with devices on the other 120v bus without special measures being taken, like possibly installing a small value capacitor to couple the controlled carrier signals from one bus to the other. At least that's my memory of the problem from reading stuff many decades ago.

I haven't ever used X10, but they have been around longer then microprocessors have been. They were never considered a 'industrial quality' control method and known for intermittent control problems and false device turn on or off and such. Doesn't mean the 'controlled carrier' couldn't be made more robust and reliable,  'internet over power lines' showed that reliable comm over power wires is possible.


bHogan

#7
Jul 06, 2011, 10:44 pm Last Edit: Jul 06, 2011, 10:47 pm by bHogan Reason: 1
Simo-post!

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Why not?

- 1) The dependability varies with the environment. If something noisy is plugged in near a module it may not work.
- 2) It has limitations that some might not like - delay, no confirmation the command was received.
- 3) The sense I get from other peoples complaints.
If you're asking technically why not, I don't have the time nor the details to go into that.

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I don't get what does "1/2 house" means for you. Can you describe that problem?

It's not an issue for you. It has to do with how US houses are wired with 2 phases of 115VAC.

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What can you advice me for 220V countries?

Personally, I have no good advice for you. I'm sure other will.
"Data is not information, information is not knowledge, knowledge is not understanding, understanding is not wisdom."
~ Clifford Stoll

marklar

I have yet to find a good alternative for an inexpensive light switch that works.  An IR switch may work. 

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