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Topic: Automating Lights/Feeder/Pump for Aquaponics using Arduino (Read 6 times) previous topic - next topic

Jshwaa

Hehe. 

I think we need a project to have an Arduino alert us of the cops being suspicious of someone Automating Lights/Feeder/Pump for Aquaponics using Arduino.

Then we can make the project of Automating Lights/Feeder/Pump for Aquaponics using Arduino.

Unless of course they let you develop Arduino projects in jail.  Hmm.....
:)

TheNewGuy


Hehe. 

I think we need a project to have an Arduino alert us of the cops being suspicious of someone Automating Lights/Feeder/Pump for Aquaponics using Arduino.

Then we can make the project of Automating Lights/Feeder/Pump for Aquaponics using Arduino.

Unless of course they let you develop Arduino projects in jail.  Hmm.....
:)


You seem quite suspicious of my motives, and I can understand that perhaps these projects have something similar to illicit growing activities, but again as I've said; I am not, and will not, be using this information to produce any illegal plants or animals. This project is for an associate as well as now part of a university project for my schooling (as I have offered to use the arduino for programming of the system it was a valid idea in my L.A.M.P courses of automation and system monitoring/design. Though it does not use much in the ways of any L.A.M.P protocols.)
Again, for the final time, this is not being used in any illegal activities and is simply a project for self sustained living.

Once more, any help would be appreciated.

markB

TheNewGuy

Like you i was also asked about a very similar project, and like you I got exactly the same queries "  For Dope growing ??..."
In this case its for hydroponics only, and is aimed at a DIY level for lettuce and other vegetables, but it has some of the same problems you are discovering.

For the flow detection, my thought was to make the returning water pass through a container that was counterweighted.
If there was insufficient water returning, the weight raised the container and triggered a switch/input, that raised an alarm.

As I understand the PH meter still needs checking each week, and they prefer to be wet all the time.
The designs I have been guided to, passed a sample of the water onto the PH meter, which was in a container, where the excess drained back.

This same design also had the nutrient added by pumping air into the tank. Apparently the nutrient is not the kindest on solenoids, and when they leak, they dump excess into the liquid. Using the air method ensured the outlet was above the level of the nutrient, and prevented that problem.

Anyway good luck, be a very interesting post.

mark

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