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Topic: Arduino UNO or Seeeduino: Noob question (Read 5611 times) previous topic - next topic

Inprogress

I have tried reading up on the differences, yet I can't figure out if I'm getting more or less or whether it is beneficial or usable for me. Living in South Africa, I only have the option of getting the Zarduino (self built or pre-built) or the Arduino (UNO and one of the others I think).

However, looking at the prices at this site (http://www.nkcelectronics.com/index.html) I see I can get a Seeeduino V2.2 (fully assembled) for a tad bit less...yet is it worth it...what am I getting extra over the Arduino UNO? I don't mind getting the Arduino UNO, but if I can get a bit of extra...uhm...functionality on the board, then I will rather do that since it will cost me similar at the end as getting the UNO locally  :)

I am a beginner and getting ready to order some parts and obviously the board (just need to move house first).
"The really amazing thing is how many people are successful with their Arduino projects considering the fact that so many of them do not have a technical background.  A lot of them seem to try, and succeed with, projects that no sane engineer would even attempt." - floresta commenting on the proper use of LCD displays

Grumpy_Mike

The Seeeduino is a copy of the arduino project. While it is perfectly legal to do this don't you think the Arduino team deserve that you buy a genuine one.
The UNO has a programmable chip to do the USB / serial conversion. In theory this could be programmed to handle other USB protocols like HID but I don't think anyone has done this yet.

Inprogress

#2
Jan 19, 2011, 03:37 pm Last Edit: Jan 19, 2011, 03:39 pm by fanjanc@gmail.com Reason: 1
Yes, absolutely the Arduino team deserves it, but if I can get something extra for the same price and actually find that something extra useful, it betters the bigger picture of what Arduino is achieving. It will also drive the Arduino boards to incorporate more features to enhance the whole learning experience that Arduino offers, as well as the capabilities that the Arduino board have.

And hence my question regarding what I actually get extra (in laymans noob language) and whether that extra is usefull/noticable. If the consensus is "yes", then I will see what the final cost will be for me to ship the Seeeduino to South Africa, pay customs etc, and weigh that price against the price of the Arduino here in South Africa.

From one supplier over here the UNO and Duemilanove costs (converted to $$$) $43 each. From RS South Africa it costs $34 (who doesn't have it in stock at the moment nor are they returning my enquiries).

So do you understand why I am considering my options?  :-/
"The really amazing thing is how many people are successful with their Arduino projects considering the fact that so many of them do not have a technical background.  A lot of them seem to try, and succeed with, projects that no sane engineer would even attempt." - floresta commenting on the proper use of LCD displays

retrolefty

I have been a Seeeduino fan ever sense I bought their mega board when it first came out. Seeeduino while fully compatible with the standard arduino, is certainly not a copy. There some really nice and useful features that they have added:

switch to enable/disable auto-reset
switch to manual select power source
switch to run board at 5v/3.3v
smaller usb connector
smaller external power connector
side mounted reset switch
optional shield connector holes at .1" spacing

So I say that Seeeduino took a proven open source design and improved on it.

Lefty

westfw

Quote
The Seeeduino is a copy of the arduino project.

Seeeduino is definitely a "value-added" re-work of the arduino project.  Seeedstudio.com (where it originates) is pretty much considered a "good example" of how the whole open source hw thing is supposed to work.  (IMO.  I'm not sure how the Arduino team feels about their competition.)  It has a number of advantages (as listed by retrolefty), and the main disadvantage is that it uses an SMT version of the main AVR chip, so you can't replace the chip if you blow it up, nor can you move the chip from the Seeeduino to a more application-specific final board...

James C4S

Quote
main disadvantage is that it uses an SMT version of the main AVR chip, so you can't replace the chip if you blow it up


However, as the shortage of DIPs continue even the official team has produced a SMD version.  (Granted this is only valid at time of posting.)
Capacitor Expert By Day, Enginerd by night.  ||  Personal Blog: www.baldengineer.com  || Electronics Tutorials for Beginners:  www.addohms.com

Inprogress

Why is there a shortage of DIPs? DIP which to my understanding is the chips that has the mounting bit on the board, and you just remove the chip and replace with a new one (as oppose to a SMT where the chip is soldered to the board - at least I learned something a few days ago  :) )
"The really amazing thing is how many people are successful with their Arduino projects considering the fact that so many of them do not have a technical background.  A lot of them seem to try, and succeed with, projects that no sane engineer would even attempt." - floresta commenting on the proper use of LCD displays

eried

I have both, and I certainly like to use my Seeeduino. Also Seeedstudio is by far the best electronic depot (trust/quality/price).
My website: http://ried.cl

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