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Topic: Learning the language of electronics (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

colbec

Excellent suggestions, thanks so much.
I think perhaps the ideal resource is hiding somewhere under crosh's beer supply.
I started out many years ago with crystal short wave radio but got diverted into philosophy and languages, you know how it goes. At that time we were just transitioning from valves (vacuum tubes) to transistors, and yes I know what a grid is in a tube context, but it's the modern bits that flummox me. A new challenge...

Good suggestion cowjam, sometimes a person just need a nudge in the right direction.

Crossroads, all good ideas, but a bit beyond my imagination just yet. I'm still at the stage where I manage to have my UNO transmitting so fast on the serial port that I have a hard time getting my revised programme uploaded! That one won't happen again.

By chance I note that the servo that came with my kit (Hextronik 9GR) has just the kind of connector I am looking for. It's a three pin female spring clip type connector. I can probably get them by the thousand somewhere.

cr0sh

Quote
I think perhaps the ideal resource is hiding somewhere under crosh's beer supply.
I started out many years ago with crystal short wave radio but got diverted into philosophy and languages, you know how it goes. At that time we were just transitioning from valves (vacuum tubes) to transistors, and yes I know what a grid is in a tube context, but it's the modern bits that flummox me.


If you have a grasp on tube electronics (sadly, my course didn't touch any of this - so you have that up on me!), more modern components shouldn't be too difficult, I would think.

The book I mentioned (Grob's Basic Electronics) will cover everything you would need to know, and then some likely. It is a college-level textbook, so new editions will be pricey ($100-200.00 USD); look into getting a used older edition.

Another reference I reccommend would be Forrest Mims III's "Engineer's Mini Notebooks" - start here:

http://www.forrestmims.org/

His mini-notebooks used to be sold at Radio Shack, but  are no longer published by them. He has published new editions (or at least I've seen them sold on his website at one time - look around); the older versions can be found on Ebay and other places if you look hard enough.

These "notebooks" are easy to read little collections of circuits; building blocks and ideas for various items, including some notes on how various components and such works. For instance, one of the notebooks is on nothing but the 555 timer, another is on nothing but semiconductors. He also has a few other books available on learning electronics and other topics. Well worth checking into.

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

colbec

The major thing I have learned after asking this question and reading the constructive and helpful responses is that now there is not only a science of what individual components do and how they perform when connected together in groups, but also there is science in how they are connected together.

Many years ago things were massive and soldered together with big blobs of solder. You took connection for granted. But now things are smaller and more sensitive to things like voltage and current and heat. You can still solder, and this is preferred for long lasting and reliable final versions, but spring clip and IDC connectors have made things a lot easier for experimenting and in situations where components need to be swapped out on a regular basis.

A Google search on "electronics ribbon cable three pin female connector" took me pretty quickly to a bunch of resources related to what I am looking for.

Thanks guys, you helped me realize the importance of the "connector" as opposed to what is being connected.

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