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Topic: REALLY simple wireless? (Read 5732 times) previous topic - next topic

baum

I am wondering if it is possible to make a simple, cheap, and reliable circuit/device to send out 1-bit data: i.e. i press a button on transmitter, led on receiver turns on. I am fully aware of the various digital radios including xbees, wixels, and nordic, but I don't want or need the features that $20 will get me. I just need 1-bit transfers, on or off. The range doesn't have to be that far (I was thinking 20ft max would be good) and the link would probably be line of sight, but I don't want to use IR. Would it be possible to do something using an RLC setup to simply turn on and off a frequency? But I want it to be as reliable as possible without sending checksums, etc, and I also would like for it to be micro-independent.

Thanks alot!
baum

RuggedCircuits

Here's a little sketch we put together showing an Arduino generating an 88.1 MHz FM radio signal:

http://ruggedcircuits.com/Arduino/fmradio.pde

The point is to show that yes, you can make a very simple RF transmitter without any extra hardware. Now the other side of this is to build the receiver :) As you say, an RLC circuit tuned to the frequency of transmission may just get you a strong enough signal at short range to look like a digital high.

--
The Gadget Shield: accelerometer, RGB LED, IR transmit/receive, speaker, microphone, light sensor, potentiometer, pushbuttons

AWOL

"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

baum

Quote
27MHz R/C rig


How do these work? LC?

Rugged Circuits: I will try that. Once I build the LC receiver, how can I prevent my local stations from interfering?

baum

RuggedCircuits

You can't, really. Instead of FM you may want to knock the frequency down to the AM range and find an AM radio frequency that is not used by local stations. Unfortunately then you are looking at getting longer and longer antennas.

For FM radio (88 MHz and up) our code is relying on the 8th harmonic of an 8 MHz oscillation from the Arduino -- very inefficient, and you really can't play with different frequencies. But the antenna size is reasonable (85cm). For AM radio you can go down as low as 500 kHz or so. With the 16-bit timer you could get 1600kHz (divide by 10), 1455kHz (divide by 11), 1300kHz (divide by 12), etc. One of these frequencies has got to be free on your radio.

--
Beat707: MIDI drum machine / sequencer / groove-box for Arduino

baum

..but I want it to be microcontroller-independent, preferably just using transistors and passives, etc.

baum

CrossRoads

Baum,
Do yourself a favor, spend $5 and learnto use virtualwire

http://www.robotshop.com/433mhz-transmitter-receiver-pair.html
17cm antenna (6.7"), can just be a peice of wirewrap wire.
Designing & building electrical circuits for over 25 years.  Screw Shield for Mega/Due/Uno,  Bobuino with ATMega1284P, & other '328P & '1284P creations & offerings at  my website.

baum

I know how to. And that is what I will probably do, because it is really easy. But I am asking how a REALLY simple one could work using passives transistors, and diodes.

baum

AWOL

It is really, really simple.
But either unlicensable, illegal or both.

So, do as CrossRoads suggests.
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

baum

Quote
unlicensable, illegal


over ~50ft maximum?

Also, I wanted it to be microcontroller independent, meaning I could hook up a button to the transmitter and an led to the receiver and have a link, but I could also have to micros hooked up, either would work. Keep in mind I don't need anything complex: I just need to send on/off signals, with maybe a buffer op-amp at the receiving end. Could I use a 555 timer, maybe?

baum

AWOL

Quote
over ~50ft maximum?

Over just about any distance you can measure.
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

Magician

Depends on the country, some low power RF (~ 10 mW) don't have to be licensed.
http://www.talkingelectronics.com/te_interactive_index.html

baum

But those only work with the virtual wire library, I want something micro-free that is legal. :)

baum

xanok

#13
Jul 27, 2011, 03:35 pm Last Edit: Jul 27, 2011, 03:37 pm by xanok Reason: 1
In my country (Brazil), most of the frequencies are prohibited.
2.4GHz (typically used by WiFi) is not, if you do not mind to take down your AP, or of the neighbor, you can use this frequency. :P

Groove

Per Arduino ad Astra

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