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Topic: "Arduino on breadboard" reproduced for Commercial Product...??? (Read 4 times) previous topic - next topic

madworm

As far as the raw hardware goes, you don't have to disclose anything. If you make up your own circuit, even if heavily inspired by other things (which is called learning by doing) and transfer that into design files that manufacturers can handle (e.g. "gerber" files, or eagle .brd ...), it is 100% up to you what you do with it. Getting inspiration is a different thing than copying 1:1.

However, if you use the arduino software (and most importantly the underlying compiler, which is licensed under GPL) to compile code for the microcontroller that is a different thing. I don't know if anybody would actually start a legal dispute about that, but better read the licenses closely. It seems to me that using a GPL-ed compiler + libraries implies that you must release the source code (or at least provide it upon request). But again I'm no lawyer.
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Chagrin

It seems to me that using a GPL-ed compiler + libraries implies that you must release the source code (or at least provide it upon request).


No, that's not correct:

Using the Arduino core and libraries for the firmware of a commercial product does not require you to release the source code for the firmware. The LGPL does, however, require you to make available object files that allow for the relinking of the firmware against updated versions of the Arduino core and libraries. Any modifications to the core and libraries must be released under the LGPL.


You mentioned that you "reproduced an Arduino on a breadboard". If your design is directly derived from the board schematics provided here on the Arduino site (a lot of copy and pasting from the Eagle .brd and .sch files) then technically you would be required to release your schematics. Granted, anyone trying to force you to release those schematics would probably just get laughed at by the community at large.

madworm

That sounds a bit more friendly. People would have to resort to disassembling the .o files and only get assembler code that is hardly usable for something else. People who could in fact use it, are clever enough to write their own code ]:D

Others would still be able to re-link the .o files against an arduino core.a file and get a working .hex file out of that. So even if the AVR itself were code-locked and potted in epoxy, they could at least try to reproduce the hardware and take the 'black-box' .hex file.

Maybe that is a high enough obstacle to keep the average ebay dudes from selling cheap(er) clones.
• Upload doesn't work? Do a loop-back test.
• There's absolutely NO excuse for not having an ISP!
• Your AVR needs a brain surgery? Use the online FUSE calculator.
My projects: RGB LED matrix, RGB LED ring, various ATtiny gadgets...
• Microsoft is not the answer. It is the question, and the answer is NO!

James C4S

Quote
I have searched the forum for help with my question but none of the answers are very clear so I would like to reach out to the community...

Have you looked at the FAQ on arduino.cc?

http://arduino.cc/en/Main/FAQ

These questions might be of interest:
- What do you mean by open-source hardware?
- Can I build a commercial product based on Arduino
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