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Topic: All about, has computing become boring? (Interesting Topic on Slash Dot) (Read 644 times) previous topic - next topic

westfw

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The vast majority of people have ALWAYS thought that "computing" was "boring."
Yep, and no.

Why I found Marisha Ray so interesting?
Rats; I was trying to ignore the sexism discussion and return to the original question...

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she also loves comics and computer graphics...  She does a lot of computing tasks to do video editing... travel to all the biggest conventions
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But she is neither an expert nor a nerd.
Sounds like an expert AND a nerd to me...  Not a programmer, or a electronics engineer, perhaps, but ... those aren't required skills.

Now, I grew up nerdy and "bright."  The guy who read chemistry books for fun, Aced the science classes (and most of everything else, except gym and german), spent all my time taking extra classes, or on the ASR33 learning new programming languages even after the class was over.  Science and Engineering *interests*, and Science and Engineering *abilities*.  Also the proverbial 80-pound weakling, bad at almost all sports.  Stereotypical NERD in capital letters.  And I met other nerds like me at SF conventions, college, and so on.

It took me a LONG TIME to figure out that you could be a "nerd" in your interests without necessarily having the abilities, or the "dis-abilities", in the subjects of those interests.   But you can.  You can think computers are the greatest thing since sliced bread with just as much nerdly enthusiasm as I have, without being able to code your way out of a paper bag.  (Shucks, you can be a professor of computer science, and a good one, without being a good "coder.")

It took me even longer to figure out that the "highly competitive" box a checked on my college search forms, thinking that it was a synonym for "rigorous and advanced", MIGHT have been more of an indication of the personality types who succeeded there...  I didn't have a great time in college :-(  (But I'm not sure that colleges separate those two types of "competitiveness" either, so I'm not sure where I would have gone instead.   Things worked out OK in the end...)

So, one of the things that HAS happened is that computing has become less exclusive than it used to be.  A lot of people LIKED that exclusivity, and I have to admit that it had its perks.  For them, "less exclusive" means "more boring."  That's a bit sad.   You should be able to enjoy your retro-hardware, ada-programming, aerospace-industry, exclusive sub-group while still appreciating the other, less exclusive skills that the "new blood" brings to the field.

I find Arduino to be a great example of this.  Yeah, there are a lot of people here who are never going to be ace coders with whom you can debate the merits of C++11 vs C++14, Python 2 vs Python 3, or 68k vs Coldfire.  But they DO bring abilities in other fields; abilities I lack.  And the real question is not "how are we different?" but "what can we accomplish together?"


GoForSmoke

I've known boring programmers who wrote boring code, even on one interesting job.
They got into programming because it promised money. I asked, that was the answer.
Masters degrees and a couple of PhD's with weak talent and weak interest, 9 to 5.

If you're bored, maybe you're tired or in a bad situation or... you may be one of those who never really had an interest for the work, only the rewards.

Programming is not for everyone even though it gets pushed. Maybe some push-back can clear the field a bit?
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

dally

I happen to have my roof in common with a bulgarian girl. She is my partner in business, and can be classified *a* nerd because she is usually busy in getting vehicles for moving computers. Big vehicles for moving big computers.

Yesterday we had a conversation. She told she already had some experiences about moving everything to and from a storage unit around her bunker in Heathrow (UK, near the airport), and last time she did she rented a truck with a tail gate lift. So I realized the reason of the conversation: she was looking for recommendations for a good van or truck here, where we are currently located. And she also said she'd successfully moved tall racks over long distances using a horse trailer.

I wondered …  long distances using a horse trailer? Hey girl? That sounds crazy. But then I confirmed they are OK about width, height and maximal transportable weight of her big computers, and I also happen to have a friend who owns a horse trailer. They have a ramp to load the equipment, and it's possible to secure a rack inside the trailer with straps. You can stand inside and unlike most other trailers they usually have a solid roof. Just get rid of the straw and shit before you hit the road.

She smiled. That's never a good sign. And then she has actually moved lots of supercomputer equipment into an innocuous looking suburban house from a horse box @_____@

You can imagine our neighbors today in the morning talking about what we really must be doing for a living.

But that's pretty genuine computer fun :D
rebel from the waist down, and remember, if you're not part of the solution, there's good money to be made in prolonging the problem.

dally

Sounds like an expert AND a nerd to me...  Not a programmer, or a electronics engineer, perhaps, but ... those aren't required skills.
Looking at her staff's equipment (and also at her desktop) it looks just like some editing room in Hollywood. So, it's 'love' at the first sight :D
rebel from the waist down, and remember, if you're not part of the solution, there's good money to be made in prolonging the problem.

dally

Hats off to a man who wrote his artwork pixel by pixel in C once upon a time - Compiling a Mac OS 8 application on Sierra - That is a super fab interesting read. All about, yet another example of genuine computing fun :D


rebel from the waist down, and remember, if you're not part of the solution, there's good money to be made in prolonging the problem.

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