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Topic: Better than Fritzing? (Read 230 times) previous topic - next topic

allanhurst

Knocking up a little project, so I need a schematic.

Any comments on this style?

Allan

larryd

Good start.

Colour selection for internet is not great.

Try to make things readable as below:




No technical PMs.
The last thing you did is where you should start looking.

ChrisTenone

Knocking up a little project, so I need a schematic.

Any comments on this style?

Allan
It's novel and logical, but a bit cryptic. The vertical lines represent devices and components. There's got to be an ideal application for this style. Space saving? Maybe print it right on the back of circuit boards?
I don't got to show you no stinkin' signature.

ChrisTenone

#3
Jul 20, 2018, 11:58 pm Last Edit: Today at 12:02 am by ChrisTenone
op's diagram:
I don't got to show you no stinkin' signature.

allanhurst

#4
Today at 07:37 am Last Edit: Today at 07:38 am by allanhurst
LarryD : your version is of course very legible, and perfectly conventional.

But I thought I'd try something a bit different.

I've been wiring up a Ford Mk1  RS2000 rally car for a friend for the past couple of days, - car electrical diagrams are abominable!

Allan

Robin2

I see two or three 18v inputs on the diagram. It would be nice if they could be on a common bus like Vin - but maybe that would make the diagram too messy.

If a common bus is not an option I would like to see a very obvious symbol the represents the 18v inputs so you can identify them without needing to read the text. (In the same way that the GND symbol is obvious).

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ChrisTenone

...
If a common bus is not an option I would like to see a very obvious symbol the represents the 18v inputs so you can identify them without needing to read the text. (In the same way that the GND symbol is obvious).

...R
That was my thought too. Something like this:

I don't got to show you no stinkin' signature.

Robin2

#7
Today at 08:56 pm Last Edit: Today at 08:56 pm by Robin2
This is more what I have in mind



...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

allanhurst

Thank you for your helpful  criticisms, gentlemen.

I'm not trying to change the electronics world, but maybe abstract a little more - an arduino or shield etc may actually be rectangular - or indeed any shape physically -  but for schematic purposes they needn't be portrayed that way.

We've ( I hope ) advanced beyond the direct physical representation of a circuit as in Fritzing which in my view obscures rather than makes clear the concepts.

Clarity/legibility is all.

Note a convention : all inputs on the left, outputs on the right. Helps visualising flow, I hope.

I'll make a modified version of my schematic incorporating your ideas, and a couple more of my own.

Ongoing.


Allan

ps I don't expect it'll get to an IEE or IEEE standard! But worse things have - remember the box-like standard
for logic symbols rather than the well-known AND, OR, EXOR  etc shapes? Died years ago, thank goodness. 

Robin2

Another thought ...

I don't create schematics for my own limited stuff - except perhaps paper and pencil.  Anything I have made so far has been on stripboard (Veroboard) and I found a program called DIYLC that allows me to do a "CAD" design for the stripboard layout.

For people you are making a proper schematic it seems to me that the ability to use it as an input to a program that can generate a PCB design would be important. That seems to rule out newfangled personal design styles.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

ChrisTenone

#10
Today at 10:48 pm Last Edit: Today at 10:53 pm by ChrisTenone Reason: .../\/\/\/\
I like to make schematics of my projects into art:



I think your new style Allan is very artsy.
I don't got to show you no stinkin' signature.

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