Go Down

Topic: ProtoShield using "Household" Items for < $5US (Read 2862 times) previous topic - next topic

retrolefty

#15
Feb 10, 2009, 06:50 pm Last Edit: Feb 10, 2009, 06:51 pm by retrolefty Reason: 1
Brett;

Will those solder joints then be mechanically strong enough to stand up to shield removal and reinsertions over time? Could make for nasty intermitten problems.

Lefty

br3ttb

Quote
Will those solder joints then be mechanically strong enough to stand up to shield removal and reinsertions over time?

I think so. since you have control over how much solder is in the initial puddle, you can use as much as you normally would.  this puts the header a little farther away from the board, but you would presumably be doing this with all the other headers as well.

since I only tried it this afternoon, I can't empirically verify the life span  ;)

Oracle

Quote
I think so. since you have control over how much solder is in the initial puddle, you can use as much as you normally would.  this puts the header a little farther away from the board, but you would presumably be doing this with all the other headers as well.


They'll be cold solder joints for sure, and it will be very hard to get enough solder on the ring to make a mechanically strong joint especially since you don't want the hole filled.

And how will you get heat transfer from the pin to the solder on the ring?  Once you've got a few rings making the mechanical connection, you won't even know for sure if the others actually melted.

Though I haven't actually tried soldering it this way.

Maybe I should try not having it completely flush and see if I can get in with a fine iron tip.

br3ttb

#18
Feb 11, 2009, 05:29 pm Last Edit: Feb 11, 2009, 06:24 pm by br3ttb Reason: 1
it's not an ideal solution to be sure.  just to clarify, in the method I described the soldering iron never touches the pin.  rather, you heat the conductor on the PC board which melts the solder.  maybe you could also tin the header pins prior to insertion to get a better connection.


Update:  the instructable (http://www.instructables.com/id/Embarassingly_Easy_Arduino_ProtoShield/) has been changed.  key pictures:

follower

The approach I use in this situation is to push the pins so that they are flush against the plastic piece of the header. Then push the header through the board from the opposite side, so the plastic is on the non-copper side of the board and the pins are long enough to be useful and still be soldered.

Here is a couple of pictures with some 2-pin headers from my Arduino AVRUSB shield:





I learned the trick from some blog somewhere as I recall. :-)

--Phil.

br3ttb

Quote
The approach I use in this situation is to push the pins so that they are flush against the plastic piece of the header. Then push the header through the board from the opposite side, so the plastic is on the non-copper side of the board and the pins are long enough to be useful and still be soldered.

neat idea!  not sure if that would work with the header I have you create in the instructable, since the wire is bent inside the header.  I think it would work Really well with the method Oracle is suggesting though.  since his bend is outside the plastic, it would be easy push them through and solder them.

Oracle

I think it might work best to push them through then solder then then bend them as I described, in that order.

Too bad I already bent my header before realizing I couldn't solder from that side.

estranged

Quote
I think it might work best to push them through then solder then then bend them as I described, in that order.


I've been following this thread for a while, since I've been wondering how to do this for a while.  I tried the push through, solder, then bend method and it seems to work pretty well.  The only difficulty I had was that once I had soldered the headers in place, they got a lot harder to bend near the interface between the board and pin (especially if I didn't do a really great job on that solder joint).  I think the next time I would alter the order slightly:

Push pins through headers, put headers into board, bend pins with them through the holes, make sure it all lines up, solder.

estranged

#23
Mar 01, 2009, 09:43 pm Last Edit: Mar 01, 2009, 09:44 pm by estranged Reason: 1
Seeedstudio sells some interesting headers that I found works really well for protoshied work.  Instead of normal headers with a short and long side, these have a long and longer side.  

http://www.seeedstudio.com/depot/break-away-headers-dual-male-40-pin-for-arduinoseeeduino-p-261.html

The longer side can go through the board and be soldered on the other side.



The super long side has plenty of room to be soldered, bent, and still mate nicely with the Arduino.

This gives you male headers on both sides.


br3ttb


dwentz

You could also just solder some right angle headers onto the bottom of the board to get the correct spacing. I did this on one board that I needed, before my proto boards got here. It worked out well, and the connections held just fine. I still do not know why they chose the spacing that they did.

Dale


br3ttb

Quote
I still do not know why they chose the spacing that they did.


Massimo gave an official explanation: http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1212632541  post #13

Go Up