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Topic: Your latest purchase (August 20th to February 11th) (Read 42721 times) previous topic - next topic

retrolefty


Created thread for GPS and positioning discussion: 

http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,91051.0.html


Finally, good riddance.

Just kidding.  ;)

KirAsh4


Finally, good riddance.

Just kidding.  ;)


Bad Lefty.  Don't make me take my Righty and slap you silly.  *smirk*

Nick Gammon

500 x zero-ohm resistors for $4.



I love this concept! A resistor with no resistance! It's like buying a box of chocolates with no chocolates in it, or a wine bottle with no wine in it.

I'm not sure what their tolerance is, but I suppose 5% of zero is still zero, so that's not a huge issue. :)
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

KirAsh4

This begs the question Nick, what on earth would you use those for?  Build a sculpture? :)

Nick Gammon

I thought someone would ask that. ;)

They must be useful, right, or they wouldn't make them?

One use is to make something look fancier than it really is. :O

They are also described as "link" so I suppose in practice you might put them onto a circuit board as a wire link so that an automatic device could install them the same way as a resistor. Might be easier for the mechanics to handle than plain wire.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

retrolefty

#380
Feb 10, 2012, 12:43 am Last Edit: Feb 10, 2012, 12:46 am by retrolefty Reason: 1

I thought someone would ask that. ;)

They must be useful, right, or they wouldn't make them?

One use is to make something look fancier than it really is. :O

They are also described as "link" so I suppose in practice you might put them onto a circuit board as a wire link so that an automatic device could install them the same way as a resistor. Might be easier for the mechanics to handle than plain wire.


Correct.

You do of course realize that it is not truly a 0 ohm resistor, such a component doesn't exist at room temperature.  ;)

Jack Christensen


They must be useful, right, or they wouldn't make them?


But then why do they make ... Oh, I won't go there  ;)

Quote

They are also described as "link" so I suppose in practice you might put them onto a circuit board as a wire link so that an automatic device could install them the same way as a resistor. Might be easier for the mechanics to handle than plain wire.


I think that's it, these were maybe more popular back in the day when single-sided PC boards were more common, and needed jumpers.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

focalist

And here I was thinking you can get a room temperature superconductor for short cash.  Ah well, back to mining zero point energy and building my Phlogiston flywheel..
When the testing is complete there will be... cake.

Osgeld

Quote
I think that's it, these were maybe more popular back in the day when single-sided PC boards were more common, and needed jumpers.


they still make and use them in their SMD form for the same reasons, if you need to have some configurable option at the time of manufacture but dont want to make different boards add pads and use a "0 ohm resistor" to jump them since pick n place machines can grab them
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

KirAsh4

So essentially, it's a piece of wire with some plastic molded over it and a single stripe painted over it.  Ah the good ol' days.

Nick Gammon


You do of course realize that it is not truly a 0 ohm resistor, such a component doesn't exist at room temperature.  ;)


Rats! I haven't bought a superconductor? I thought they were a bit cheap ...
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Jack Christensen



You do of course realize that it is not truly a 0 ohm resistor, such a component doesn't exist at room temperature.  ;)


Rats! I haven't bought a superconductor? I thought they were a bit cheap ...


False advertising! Call 1-800-LAWSUIT
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Nick Gammon


You do of course realize that it is not truly a 0 ohm resistor, such a component doesn't exist at room temperature.  ;)


Hey, I see what you mean! ...



I've been gypped! It's an outrage!
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

KirAsh4



Hey, I see what you mean! ...



I've been gypped! It's an outrage!


Either that, or your meter is a fluke. :)  (sorry, I had to say it.)

retrolefty




Hey, I see what you mean! ...



I've been gypped! It's an outrage!


Either that, or your meter is a fluke. :)  (sorry, I had to say it.)


Nice meter, I have a couple of older mode 87s.  A hint, when measuring low value resistances, first short your meter leads together, turn to the resistance mode and then press the 'REL' button. That will then factor out ('zero out') your meter lead resistance and the display will say 'rel' to remind you that the reading is the resistance value above the meter leads resistance.

Lefty

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