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Topic: IR Battle Tanks (Read 14 times) previous topic - next topic

strykeroz

That's awesome stuff.  Is there a way for the towers to identify friend-or-foe or do they target any nearby target ?
"There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse"
- retired astronaut Chris Hadfield

Paulware

That's a good point.  Currently the ultrasonic sensor only detects distance rather than type, a tank could be killed by friendly fire.

IR pulses are unique and could be rejected, if the tank detected a "friendly" IR shot. 

For example HuanQi pulses are different from Forces of Valor pulses which are different from Battle Machine pulses. 

Currently my "hacked" tanks output all the pulses and accept all the pulses as hits. 

I was thinking that I might add RF receiver to the tower to turn them "off" when I wanted to pass.

Alternately I could add an IR receiver to them and use an IR remote to turn them on/off.  This is probably the cheapest method.

What do you think?

strykeroz

I presume these turrets are not going to be immortal in the final design?  If so, another option (not as straightforward perhaps?) is to have your turrets use their iR sensor that's used for recording hits to decode an iR beacon LED on each tank which broadcasts a friend/foe or team iD?
"There is no problem so bad you can't make it worse"
- retired astronaut Chris Hadfield

Paulware

#18
Apr 09, 2012, 04:20 am Last Edit: Apr 09, 2012, 05:12 am by Paulware Reason: 1

 To add an element of strategy, I used the repair robots to enable/disable the tower.  Previously the repair pulse only fixed vehicles, but now the tower will respond to a repair pulse by stopping its scan and firing.  

 Another possible future option would be for a repair robot to repair a disabled enemy unit and "claim" it for the friendly side.

 Note:  I hacked up this rumble robot pretty bad.  The problem ended up being old AA batteries.  It needed fresh ones. The way their motors are geared, they don't behave well with marginal batteries.
I ended up adding a TIP120 (NPN transistor) to the arm movement because I couldn't find the pin that controlled them.  If anyone knows where this pin is located, please send me a .jpg...thanks.

 Most people place their rumble robot controller in the head, but this requires that the arm motors be removed.  I kind of liked the arm motion, so I had to place my controller on the outside of the robot...Not very pretty, but the arm motion is cute for simulating the repairing of the vehicle.

Paulware

I think landmines could be made cheaply using: http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Force-Sensitive-Resistor-FSR/step5/Notes/ force sensors made from conductive foam + atmega168

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