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Topic: NA5W-K relay (Read 3367 times) previous topic - next topic

clankill3r

I have a relay that looks like this:


The
NA5W-K
7aG-001

the datasheet can be found here:
http://datasheet.octopart.com/NA-5W-K-Fujitsu-datasheet-37825.pdf

I connected it to my arduino but it doesn't click or something.


Is it seen from top or bottom?

I have 5v from the arduino coming to 1 / 12 (depending if it's seen from top).
Is that correct, and which number must i connect to arduino to switch the relay?




dc42

On the datasheet it says that is the view from the bottom.

Connect pin 12 to Arduino ground and pin 1 to a digital output pin. Also connect a diode (1n4148 will do) across the relay coil, cathode to pin 1, anode to pin 12. Then the relay should energise when you set the output pin HIGH. It's a small, low power relay, so the click may be very quiet.
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terryking228

Hi, This relay has 178 ohm coil so it (would) draw about 30 ma at 5V. So it should work with Arduino.

If you are going to use many of these you need to consider how much current per PORT is allowed. See: http://arduino-info.wikispaces.com/ArduinoPinCurrent

Where did you get these relays??
Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

clankill3r

Thanks, i got the relays from "radio piet" :) which is a local store in town.

Thanks for the link about port current.

I drawed what you say,


So that should be bassicly it, but where do i connect the wires to of the 2.7 volt circuit (2.7 if i remember correct, can be a bit more or less like 0.# ).
And this means that 5volt is coming out of all pins right?

Also a classmate of me buyed other relays a long time ago, he had 5 of them and 2 of them never worked he said. He went back to the local store and they measured it and they said they where ok. He's a noob just like me, but he was able to get the other 3 working, is this just luck?

Grumpy_Mike

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but where do i connect the wires to of the 2.7 volt circuit


What 2.7V circuit?

Once you have the relay clicking on an off you simply connect the contacts up to the circuit you want to switch.

retrolefty

Quote
I drawed what you say,


The diode may very well be drawn backwards and if installed that way will short out the output pin when turned on high and burn out the pin. Diodes don't have a + and - sign on then, they have a cathode identification mark. In your example you would want the cathode to wire to the output pin and the anode lead to wire to the ground pin.

By the way if your relay has + and - labeled on the coil terminals then is must already have an internal diode wired across the coil. Some DC relays have an internal diode option avalible and many do not, check your datasheet.

Lefty

clankill3r

What 2.7V circuit?
I connect it to my canon camera with a jack plug. Sorry i forgot to tell that.

Once you have the relay clicking on an off you simply connect the contacts up to the circuit you want to switch.
That will be 3 and 5?

By the way if your relay has + and - labeled on the coil terminals then is must already have an internal diode wired across the coil. Some DC relays have an internal diode option avalible and many do not, check your datasheet.

i can't find it in the datasheet so i don't think it has it.

Grumpy_Mike

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That will be 3 and 5?

No 4 and 5

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i can't find it in the datasheet so i don't think it has it.

Not sure I follow the logic there. I can't find next weeks winning lottery numbers but I am sure there are some.

Measure the resistance of the coil with a meter, if it is different in one direction to the other then there is a diode in there.
If you haven't got a meter then get one, they are very cheap and you have no business doing electronics without one.

clankill3r

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That will be 3 and 5?


Where is 4 for?

Quote
Not sure I follow the logic there. I can't find next weeks winning lottery numbers but I am sure there are some.

Measure the resistance of the coil with a meter, if it is different in one direction to the other then there is a diode in there.
If you haven't got a meter then get one, they are very cheap and you have no business doing electronics without one.


I have a meter, i will measure it, thanks for the help.



Grumpy_Mike

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Where is 4 for?

To the question where is 4, it is between 3 and 5.

To the question why use 4, it is because it is the common connector on the relay contacts.

When the relay is not energised there is contact between 3 and 4, when the relay is energised there is contact between 4 and 5.
There is never any contact between pins 3 and 5, so connect them up if you want but you will not get any current flowing between them.

clankill3r

thanks man, i got it working!!

althought 1 problem now but not related to the relay (as i know of, maybe it is but it's worth another topic).

O yeah, i did a diode test on the relay with my mulitmeter, and it gave me a value but lower then the n14148 i buyed. I hooked up without a diode. (difference was like 20% ).

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