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Topic: Professions??  Funding?? (Read 4076 times) previous topic - next topic

westfw

I'm a software engineer, for embedded systems rather larger than Arduinos.

Catcher

My scrap comes from my childhood toys, last year's birthday present, and non-working stuff from the house. And occasionally things my brother left behind when he went to college.  :P

I'm not really an adult yet i do have a lot of "crap" in my bedroom. And no one is telling me to clean it  :)

My parents think I'm some sort of genius and encourage it. :-?

mowcius

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My parents think I'm some sort of genius and encourage it.

I think most parents would not think that way...  ;)

MikMo

I work as a software developer in a small IT consulting company. I work mostly with Microsoft products, writing .net code, SQL server stuff, and i'm   also working a lot with the open source CMS system Umbraco (really cool system).

zageek

I currently work on portable laser/speed cameras for a living and I have formally studied EE and have worked in various electronics related sectors. My best job was my brieft stint a home automation systems-integrator where I got to work with something that really interested me.

I fund my stuff from my own pocket and working with electronics allows you to get samples and even salvage stuff from decommissioned equipment. I am generally a scavenger and I have "dumpster dived" for some components in the past, nowadays that is not worth the effort though.
South African Arduino User Group

http://arduino.za.net

Grumpy_Mike

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She gets to collect fabric, yarn, sewing machines, and so on,


Snap  ;)

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- I'm not married, and have no kids.
Don't underestimate how rich that latter one makes you.


Yes I found out when they left home.

Another good way of getting stuff is to sell kits for electronics projects. When you over order or kits don't sell well you have stuff you can use on the next project. If you register as a business then it all becomes tax deductible.  ;)

pwillard

I'm an IT Network Consultant with a large Computer Manufacturer.  As a result... I always enjoy that spot where software meets hardware.

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My wife and I have an arrangement.  She gets to collect fabric, yarn, sewing machines, and so on, and I get to collect electronics parts, tools, and equipment.  No problem!


Amen!   This is the truth.  One of my wife's sewing machines is worth $14,000.  My Arduino and tinkering habit will NEVER catch up to that... so there is an "understanding".

donkahones

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One of my wife's sewing machines is worth $14,000


WTF?  does that thing sew all by itself?  for $14K it better.

cr0sh

Software developer here; currently working for a small company (there are 6 of us) doing web application development using LAMP, mainly. We concentrate mostly on PHP and MySQL, with some Perl thrown in (plus DHTML and all that).

My skillset in software runs far beyond PHP, though; I've been coding in one form or another for over 25 years - I've played with everything from Logo to Lisp (interestingly, I have yet to try Algol, Snobal, or Ada - not sure there is much point, though).

Despite being a software developer, I still enjoy it once I get home; the Arduino, electronics, robotics, and virtual reality are all hobbies to me, right now, and likely always will be. I am attempting to gear things up to launch a small business for robotics development (cleaning up my shop is the first step - ugh), but for right now, it is all play and experimentation.

I am married, and I don't have any kids, nor do I want any. I have a modest house that is (more or less) "paid off", and no debt to speak of. I wish our energy costs were lower (we're working on that; we just got new doors and windows installed, plus extra insulation, and that has helped things immensely with our energy bill).

I have found the Arduino to be fun, and most of the time, a relaxing and educational pursuit. I am always learning new things about it (thanks to everyone on this forum!)...

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

sciguy

I'm only 13, but I have work I can do that pays 3$ an hour.  I work 5 hrs a week.
I also have money from my grandma.  (maybe hat doesn't really apply to you.)   :D
Soundcloud page: http://soundcloud.com/beefinator-2
Youtube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/beefinator14
Old soundcloud page (ran out o

Ran Talbott

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I have yet to try Algol, Snobal, or Ada - not sure there is much point, though


Well,  Algol and Ada are just Pascal for the aging and the anal-retentive (respectively)   ;D

SNOBOL was extremely kewl (though we didn't call it that then,  of course) back in the days when a "string" was what you used to hold your FORTRAN program deck together because you'd run out of rubber bands.  It was a pleasant surprise to find a DOS implementation of it in the 1980s.  But once awk became available on non-*nix systems,  SNOBOL pretty much melted.   :)

pracas

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I'm only 13, but I have work I can do that pays 3$ an hour


Isn't that Child Labor? ;)

Cool dude... thats as much as adults get paid where i live!
Be The Change...

mowcius

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Isn't that Child Labor?

Cool dude... thats as much as adults get paid where i live!

Hmm, about £2... Isn't that under minimum wage too?

I had a job when I was 13 but I got £4.20/h (about $6 ish) and I thought that was bad!

Mowcius

Groove

#28
Mar 09, 2010, 01:21 pm Last Edit: Mar 09, 2010, 01:44 pm by GrooveFlotilla Reason: 1
I'm a software engineer, for embedded systems about the same size as an Arduino 2009, but very, very much more powerful.

Not much in the way of component fall-out for re-use, because everything is BGA, too damn small or both!
Per Arduino ad Astra

Grumpy_Mike

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I'm only 13, but I have work I can do that pays 3$ an hour.


When I was 13 we didn't do jobs but I had pocket money. I remember saving up for three weeks just to buy a single transistor (an OC71), transistors were expensive in those days. It was for an audio amplifier in a transistor radio project.

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