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Topic: 10v Enough to Fry ATMega328 and 1602 LCD? (Read 892 times) previous topic - next topic

willmp

Title says it all.

Built a variable PSU with a LM317. Set it to 10v for a breadboard circuit, came back to ATMega board with 1602 LCD I was making - forgot reset it back to 5v. Board no longer functioning. Assuming the answer, having looked at the datasheets, is yes.

Ordered both fresh anyway. Plus a panel volt meter for the PSU (and some 5v regulators). Live and learn, huh?  XD

KirAsh4

Yeah, a bare Mega has a max VCC of 6V ...  This is why I will always have a regulator on any project I make, regardless if what I'm feeding it is already within tolerance ...

Now, any of the actual Arduino Mega boards on the market should be able to handle up to 12V.  If that's what you had and you fed it 10V, it should continue to work just fine.

willmp

Nope. Wasn't on an Arduino board. It was nude to the 10V.

Won't make that mistake again :)

KirAsh4

Blue smoke?  If not, then you didn't fry it right. :)

MarkT

Modern CMOS transistors have _stunningly_ thin gate oxide, overvoltage will cause dielectric breakdown for sure.
[ I won't respond to messages, use the forum please ]

KirAsh4

Aye.  Chalk it up to everyone wanting smaller and faster components.  I say we go back to vacuum tubes!

liudr



Aye.  Chalk it up to everyone wanting smaller and faster components.  I say we go back to vacuum tubes!

I am too young to use tube technology except for TV. I am fascinated on the other hand. Any book that is good enough for learning the golden age of.tube technology?
I want to discuss tubes in my modern physics.

KirAsh4

Tubes are primarily used in audio applications nowadays.  Quiality, expensive amps will have tubes in them.  I don't have any book recommendations, but just searching Amazon for 'vacuum tubes' will give you plenty of options.

ajofscott

I got my introduction into electronics via a 1948 edition of the NRI correspondence course here is a link to the 30's era course set.
http://www.renovatedradios.com/nri_1927-30.html

retrolefty

To this day the majority of ham radio high power amplifiers (500-1500 watt range) still use vacuum tubes. There are some solid state high power ham amplifiers but the tube amps all more common.

liudr

Thanks guys. What I really want is a book that talks about the vacuum tube technology across the boundary of disciplines and applications. There are so many tubes beside audio amplifiers and rectifiers, such as x ray tubes, laser tubes, electron guns, mass spectrometers, etc. All sorts of discoveries are also linked to using vacuum tubes I bet.

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