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Topic: Will the Due be a dud? (Read 10814 times) previous topic - next topic

retrolefty


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it'd be awesome for people like me who really have no previous programming experience other than arduino, to be able to use the same language to do more powerful applications
It already exists - it's called processing (http://processing.org/)

AFAIK it runs on linux platforms so probably one could use it on raspberry PI


An Arduino is programmed in the C/C++ language on a IDE that was designed using Processing and programmed with the Java language.

Arduino programming = C/C++ language
Processing programming = Java language

I've been told the C/C++ and Java are similar but are diffent languages.

Lefty

GoForSmoke

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Well yeah but I don't mean doing the programming on the board, just it receiving a program, basically the ability to take commands like that without the os and the speed to do it


Even with an OS, once you get into a nice IDE you don't have to do much to deal with the OS. With Arduino you have exactly that and how much do you mind the way it is?

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

Benji



An Arduino is programmed in the C/C++ language on a IDE that was designed using Processing and programmed with the Java language.

Arduino programming = C/C++ language
Processing programming = Java language

I've been told the C/C++ and Java are similar but are diffent languages.

Lefty


C/C++ and Java are similar in syntaxis but totally different  languages.
For one, C/C++ compile into native code where Java always needs an interpreter to run.
C goes more in depth than Java, it allows you to talk to hardware directly, Java always has a layer in between so you can't make use of the full resources as a machine.

Processing makes it even more slow, since processing creates Java code even more inefficient than Java allready is.

winner10920

Yes, I really like the way arduino works, maybe im thinking this wrong but why would you need an os on a microcontroller type board? doesn't it just use up space and resources?

Graynomad

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why would you need an os on a microcontroller type board?

You don't, at least for 99% of the projects presented here. The other 1% don't need one either but it might make life easier.

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doesn't it just use up space and resources?

Yep, most (all?) current Arduinos would struggle with resources, the new Due however should handle one nicely.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

kerimil

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why would you need an os on a microcontroller type board? doesn't it just use up space and resources?
Most arduino compatible OLED modules that I've seen cost more than raspberry PI  :)

So who cares that it uses up resources?
Besides your lcd module is going to use up resources too


Benji

The Raspberry Pi isn't intended as a 'microcontroller board', it is intended to be a small computer that let's you experiment without risking destroying the 'family pc' so it is out of the running for a while untill somebody fixes it.
It is geared towards those who wish to experiment with programming and such.
It is meant for totally different things than the Arduino is.

Since the price is so low it will probably be used for a lot of things, and maybe even the same things as Arduino, but it is not intended to be an Arduino on steroids, it is just a small Linux pc which is easy to hack into hardware since everything is documented to death.

winner10920

I gotta agree with that, well said
That's the best part about the due, for people who want a faster microcontroller or a computer independent one, it'll be nice
If I wanted to use linux and do stuff with that, id just put it on my computer
but im looking for that arduino "on steroids" lol

kerimil

#53
Jan 15, 2012, 08:27 pm Last Edit: Jan 16, 2012, 03:21 am by kerimil Reason: 1
is it really that much different ?? come on... a microcontroller is a thing with a bunch of I/Os that is normaly used to control some process, like 'when I press this button right here the board tells the motor to spin 10% faster'

who cares that it has specs that most personal computers had in 2003...? it has general purpose I/Os and can handle stuff such as SPI or I2C... isn't that all you need?

One thing that I hate about arduino is that it requires special shields to handle stuff such as WIFI... if raspberry PI can accept usb wifi dongles, cameras and memory sticks does it mean it isn't a microntroller ?

I don't think so... it's a microcontroler that can do a lot more than a typical microcontroller, yet it costs less or more less as much as 32 bit dev boards

winner10920

The shield part isn't that big of a deal, you can always make a custom shield, or like I recently did, a shield that was mainly just for connectors to make it easy to attach the rest of the project
And I think its not the controller that makes it arduino, more the apparent simplicity
just a quick look at the raspberrypi makes me think that in order to blink an led there's a little more involved than just plugging it into a computer, and uploading the blink an led sketch
the hardest part for some new users is probably installing the arduino drivers, after that its making sure the led is not wired backwards
That's the beauty of arduino

smeezekitty

I am surprised that many people are not addressing flash memory.
The Due will not have any more flash then the Arduino Mega.
I know that usually 256K is plenty but if you have images or audio in memory, it chews up the flash memory VERY quickly.
I would think they should have picked a chip with atleast 512K of flash.
Avoid throwing electronics out as you or someone else might need them for parts or use.
Solid state rectifiers are the only REAL rectifiers.
Resistors for LEDS!

kerimil

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And I think its not the controller that makes it arduino, more the apparent simplicity
just a quick look at the raspberrypi makes me think that in order to blink an led there's a little more involved than just plugging it into a computer, and uploading the blink an led sketch
That's why I love arduino... but it seems that the apparent simplicity is in it's IDE

Just have a look at Maple boards... >>> http://leaflabs.com/docs/maple-quickstart.html#compile-a-program

It looks as easy as arduino

and here is what they write about it:

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In the past, ARM processors were notoriously unfriendly to non-professionals, due to proprietary tool chains, unfamiliar instruction sets, and impenetrable supporting literature. LeafLabs has changed this for Maple by providing a complete ARM platform, built from open source components, which includes an intuitive programming environment and friendly, thorough documentation.

For all the Arduino lovers out there, Maple is offered in an Arduino-compatible format, complete with an Arduino pin layout and programming environment.



I hope this kind of simiplicity could be applied to Raspberry PI too... Though to be honest I have no idea if it's possible to have a single board computer that acts as a microcontroller and runs an OS at the same time so that I could do stuff such as: sending sensor readings over WIFI

Or for example mount the board on an RC car, attach a usb cam and stream it via WIFI while allowing me to control the car


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In the past, ARM processors were notoriously unfriendly to non-professionals, due to proprietary tool chains, unfamiliar instruction sets, and impenetrable supporting literature. LeafLabs has changed this for Maple by providing a complete ARM platform, built from open source components, which includes an intuitive programming environment and friendly, thorough documentation.

For all the Arduino lovers out there, Maple is offered in an Arduino-compatible format, complete with an Arduino pin layout and programming environment.


I hope this kind of simiplicity could be applied to Raspberry PI too... Though to be honest I have no idea if it's possible to have a single board computer that acts as a microcontroller and runs an OS at the same time so that I could do stuff such as: sending sensor readings over WIFI


Maple is great, I have one...  I wish more people were into it, but it's pretty silent over in Maple-land.  Raspberry PI is a different creature.  Since it runs Linux, we'll have access to a LOT more code out there.  But I don't expect it to be simple, beyond the (likely) limited use cases that people choose to simplify.  Simplicity doesn't seem to be an organizing principle of Raspberry PI, like it is for Arduino.

kerimil

their aims are a bit different - true...
but if it really is just a software problem then some will probably find a way to use an arduino like IDE on it

winner10920

Question is more likely are some people gonna invest the time to make that a more friendly software? im sure arduino has put in a decent amount of time making things friendly, probably the most time relative to most other platforms

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