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Topic: Highly Anticipated 32-bit "Due" due When? (Read 65 times) previous topic - next topic

cr0sh


"regimented, secretive, proprietary, corporate cultures like ATMEL"
and yet isn't everything about the chips we use published on their website for us engineers?


You know where the VHDL is? (I actually haven't looked, as I have no need for it nor the knowledge to use it - but it would be cool to see!)...
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

terryking228

#11
Jan 23, 2012, 11:46 pm Last Edit: Feb 07, 2012, 01:21 pm by terryking228 Reason: 1
We know we aren't going to see the VHDL from ATMEL or FTDI, or the internal schematics of the voltage regulators.

We DO expect to see how those many documented subsystems are put together to make a DUE.  

Many have forked the earlier hardware Arduinos with good results.  

The Arduino IDE System consists of subsystems, many from ATMEL, for which the source code is not available, plus various (I think) open source components.  The IDE has been hacked pretty deeply by a few, like Ardblock (https://github.com/taweili/ardublock).

Hi, If you're interested in following the development of ArduBlock, mentioned above, there is now a discussion group here:
http://groups.google.com/group/ardublock?hl=en

For those of us who want a widely collaborative development effort, I don't think Arduino is gonna be it.
Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

Graynomad

#12
Jan 24, 2012, 03:16 am Last Edit: Jan 24, 2012, 03:17 am by Graynomad Reason: 1
Quote
The benevolent dictator model works

A benevolent dictatorship has always been the most efficient form of government and of project management for that matter. As long as the bloke at the top stays sane and knows what he's doing :)

Quote
For those of us who want a widely collaborative development effort, I don't think Arduino is gonna be it.

This is one reason I like the DuinoMite project. I think the hardware was a done deal by the designer but the software is certainly collaborative.

Maybe people aren't that interested in collaborating on hardware, I only got one response to my call to collaborate on a Due-like board and that was from a member that is mostly a software type (actually that was good because I'm mostly hardware). While it's easier in many ways to just do your own thing, however you usually get a better product if there are a few minds on the job.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

randomvibe

I suppose a company can not be PURELY open source software & hardware, otherwise making a profit would be very difficult, especially with the globalized economy.  The Chinese will always make it faster, cheaper, and although not the best, good enough.

Plenty of bootstrapped microcontroller modules are out in the market.  Why did Arduino catch on so immensely?  My guess:  low cost, the choice of a common language (C), floating point math, analog-to-digital converters (missing in basic stamp) & other peripherals, a very good forum, and "open source".  But the same can be said about leaflabs.com, so what is it about Arduino?  How did they make it into Radio Shack stores?

terryking228

Quote
I suppose a company can not be PURELY open source software & hardware, otherwise making a profit would be very difficult,


Adafruit.com says they made a lot of money while everything they sell is open source.  There was a good New York Times article about it.

Why would I use the OPenSource info to build and populate an Arduino board when I can buy one for less than $20??  If I want to make a modified fork of that design to provide special functions, and I am going to make 500+ of them, that's different (I'm thinking of doing that right now)...
Regards, Terry King terry@yourduino.com  - Check great prices, devices and Arduino-related boards at http://YourDuino.com
HOW-TO: http://ArduinoInfo.Info

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