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Topic: Gyro stabilised camera mount for motorcycle visibility  (Read 109 times) previous topic - next topic

DKenp

Ive just started tinkerinf with an Arduino.  I would eventually like to be abke to use one to control a camera platform stabilised by a gyro for my motorcycle.  I haven't programmed anything since doing stuff in BASIC on Sinclair Z81 and ZX Spectrums in the early eighties. Just how advanced would such a project be?

JasonC0x0D

It probably wouldn't be to bad for an entry level project, but depending how much you wanted to do from "scratch"  it could get very complex very quickly.

Is something like this what your are thinking?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16wCUMcpOZE

You might want to check out gimbals for quad copters as that might be a good starting point.






Domino60



Here come the price, there is expensive gimbals but as well cheap, you can make them
on your own or buy them ready.

Using servo motors is a good starting point but you still will get a bit of shake for better
smooth quality you need brushless motors but as well the price is big.

If you want to build you own one start small don't spend hundreds just few dollars get
some 9gr servos, mpu6050, arduino and use PID formula to balance them. Don't be scared of
the programming it's really easy after you take few hours of look.


Think about those points,  start small, prototype, understand and then go big.


D.60
To be or not to be? Read a book and you will see.
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DKenp

It probably wouldn't be to bad for an entry level project, but depending how much you wanted to do from "scratch"  it could get very complex very quickly.

Is something like this what your are thinking?  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16wCUMcpOZE

You might want to check out gimbals for quad copters as that might be a good starting point.

It is but I would be building a smaller gimbal and as its just for lean on a bike then not so much movement would be needed. I looked up the code the guy used on github and it looks way beyond me at this time.

Here come the price, there is expensive gimbals but as well cheap, you can make them
on your own or buy them ready.

Using servo motors is a good starting point but you still will get a bit of shake for better
smooth quality you need brushless motors but as well the price is big.

If you want to build you own one start small don't spend hundreds just few dollars get
some 9gr servos, mpu6050, arduino and use PID formula to balance them. Don't be scared of
the programming it's really easy after you take few hours of look.

Think about those points,  start small, prototype, understand and then go big.
D.60
I have a MEGA 2560 and an MPU6050 as well as an Arduino Uno and loads of servos hanging around.

Thanks for the responses its helps to know theres a practical application possible eventually.

allanhurst

These things have been used professionally for years, and are entirely mechanical..  but not cheap.

try 'steadycam'....

Allan

Domino60


Quote
Thanks for the responses its helps to know theres a practical application possible eventually.
There is always a solution on the problem just think twice and look the problem from different angles.
Having a mpu6050/uno and servo you already can start building a prototype, get some small wood plates,
rulers  / ice chopsticks or what you have to connect the servos, (Note: Connect the servos from different
power supply not direct to arduino, the servos draw lot of current and it will burn your arduino, use a
external battery).

After mastering the circuit and code, experiment see if it's what you need then upgrade to something
more of your price and stable.

Example of 9g servo gimbals:








D.60
To be or not to be? Read a book and you will see.
Join Discord Free_World (Arduino_Room) Live chat
https://discord.gg/bBXEuKQ

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