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Topic: Building a wifi robot (Work in progress) (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

cinaed666

Jan 27, 2012, 08:57 pm Last Edit: Jan 27, 2012, 09:03 pm by cinaed666 Reason: 1
Hey people, I'll be posting the progress on my final highschool project here. It's a wifi-controlled robot, with a streaming camera.
basicly, I gutted a big old RC car, and used an arduino ethernet along with a motor controller I designed for this purpose and a linksys router to make it happen.
I kept the 9.6V (actually about 10.5V when fully charged) LiPo battery that clicks in the bottom for convenience, since I have two and a charger, and it doesn't take a lot of place.
Right now, I'm able to control it over command line, since it's running a telnet server from which I can control the output pins.
In the end, I want to be able to have a user-friendly program that interfaces with the telnet server, show the streaming camera image, and take joystick inputs.


Motor controller using L293B ICs and an LM7806 to feed both the ICs and the Arduino.
I opted for a 6V instead of 5 since there was a voltage drop because of the load, it's actually outputting just over 5V, whereas an LM7805 was only giving me about 3.5V



WIP


Testing out the telnet sketch


Everything fitting snug.


I'd love to hear some feedback. Also, what would be the best "transformer" IC to up a voltage from about 9-10V to 12?
I guess this would do? http://www.national.com/pf/LM/LM2621.html#Overview

cr0sh

What do you need the 12 volts for - the router? Whatever, it would probably be easier and better to get a couple of 7.2 volt packs, wired in series (make a "y-cable" that allows for this, so you can disconnect each to charge the batteries), then drop the voltage down with a 7812 regulator (and if you need the current, use a bypass transistor - or even better, see about getting a drop-in 3-pin switching regulator for 12 volts). Ultimately, you're likely to get a better system with a longer runtime going that route. So far, though, your machine is looking great! :D
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

zoomkat

I did some tinkering with making a simple web controlled routerbot at the below link. The bottom link is to a web cam that has a similar control setup.

http://www.lynxmotion.net/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=6343

http://web.comporium.net/~shb/wc2000-PT-script.htm
Consider the daffodil. And while you're doing that, I'll be over here, looking through your stuff.   8)

cinaed666


What do you need the 12 volts for - the router? Whatever, it would probably be easier and better to get a couple of 7.2 volt packs, wired in series (make a "y-cable" that allows for this, so you can disconnect each to charge the batteries), then drop the voltage down with a 7812 regulator (and if you need the current, use a bypass transistor - or even better, see about getting a drop-in 3-pin switching regulator for 12 volts). Ultimately, you're likely to get a better system with a longer runtime going that route. So far, though, your machine is looking great! :D


Yep, I need 12V for the router. I'm considering your solution, but the up-voltage IC would be easier to add to the controller at this point. :P

cr0sh



What do you need the 12 volts for - the router? Whatever, it would probably be easier and better to get a couple of 7.2 volt packs, wired in series (make a "y-cable" that allows for this, so you can disconnect each to charge the batteries), then drop the voltage down with a 7812 regulator (and if you need the current, use a bypass transistor - or even better, see about getting a drop-in 3-pin switching regulator for 12 volts). Ultimately, you're likely to get a better system with a longer runtime going that route. So far, though, your machine is looking great! :D


Yep, I need 12V for the router. I'm considering your solution, but the up-voltage IC would be easier to add to the controller at this point. :P


How much current does the router need - have you measured this? The part you referenced states that it can supply a maximum of 1A (I also wonder if a heatsink will be needed for that part, as well as what that does to the voltage level of the battery - and how that will effect the rest of the system)...
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

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