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Topic: Schools in session; help carefully... (Read 2804 times) previous topic - next topic

GoForSmoke


There are sites where a typical and frequent answer to most any technical questions is "have you RTFM?"


Maybe because the manual already has the explanation. After typing the same basic thing again and again it makes sense to point to the manual instead. To be fair about it there usually is a stickied post up top or actual text right up front saying to look in the manual and search the site before asking the question as the answer has probably been discussed and posted already. In some cases there are even compilations of answers with links and often they are called FAQ.
After all that, how do you treat the person who skips "all that reading" and demands answers? On a good day, I am still nice but usually I just shake my head and move on.

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Those kinds of forums tend to be occupied by a small group of elitist which do not really seek to help anyone other then each other.


Si! The learning level is pro and they get the most when "the talk" is at their level. If the forum admin wants new people in then a new beginner's section to that forum should be made.

Sometimes there's a big people table separate from the little people's table in different rooms. It's because the big people want to be able to talk big people talk. It's a PITA when you're little but tell me, have you ever coded in a team where when you want to make real decisions the first thing you do is ditch the managers?
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

GoForSmoke


Aren't programmers prone to controlling things since they create their own rules? That's what I thought.  ]:D


Tell that to my compilers.
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

GoForSmoke

I really do wonder if there are not Business Admin courses where the assignment is "get others to do work for free".

-- it really fits with what I have experienced and see

-- if there ain't then the BusAd profs aren't thinking

Someone posted about good code and bad code as if coding ability is the key to rising in companies. What I have seen is that schmoozing and BS is often the faster track for those with 2 out of 3; looks, style, money. The ones who are the worst at it, they make into better-paid managers. That rise to the level of your incometence principle has been an industry-driver since long before I was born. That's part of why things are so good today!

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

kf2qd




Someone posted about good code and bad code as if coding ability is the key to rising in companies.



Sometimes it isn't Good/Bad code that is the decider, but its working and on to the next fire started by someone with little knowledge of the process.

There are many in management that think that everything is done by voice command (the more creative the worse it gets) and can never figure out why it take 8 weeks to get a project done (and why you need 6 of those 8 weeks) when it just took them 5 minutes to come up with the idea. I have also had t deal with those who see the deadline of 12 weeks for delivery and they use 11 of those weeks trying to get the design changes done and wonder why you can't do 6 weeks of manufacturing in 1 week and figure it must be incompetent people in the shop who can never get anything shipped on time...

liudr

My brother is a professional software developer. He wants all the nice testing and else for his projects but the management only cares about rolling out projects ASAP. Not all business value quality as they do quantity. If you do it right (code well), you can do it again easier and make changes easier. If you just barely get by (code badly), you need more time to make changes and maybe redo a lot what you did before. It's like building a house with good or bad foundations. Construction companies could build a few good houses and sell them for good price, or they can build crappy houses and sell a lot of them at low price and they are hard to fix.

GoForSmoke

Ancient programmer saying: write code twice, throw first away.

Also, it's far far easier to write code that's already been done than to break new, unknown ground.

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

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