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Author Topic: 2MOTOR for Arduino Nano Installation Help  (Read 610 times)
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hawaii
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Hey guys,

I've recently purchased a motor driver from gravitech linked here: http://www.gravitech.us/2mwfecoadfor.html and i'm having trouble implementing this device with a 1.5-3 V DC Motor. I didn't really understand the schematic on the website nor the datasheet. It wasn't clear to me which circuits I need to setup, and which circuits were already built in to the driver.  I've already tried to set this up once and my Arduino Nano started to heat up, so I decided to give it a rest and try to do more research. At the end of the day, I am still confused. Please help..

Also, I noticed that there is a 7-12 V terminal jack at the bottom of the device module, what is this for? Does my Arduino Nano need to still be hooked hooked up to Vin and Aref if there is voltage coming from the terminal?

Thank you in advanced,
ejay
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uh manoa: college of eng.
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For a 3V motor, connect 3V to the motor power inputs marked "7-12V".  Hook motor to A1 and A2.
Code:
    digitalWrite(4, direction);  // LOW for one way, HIGH for the other
    analogWrite(5, speed);     //  0 for OFF to 255 for full speed.

IF your motor runs on 7 to 12 volts you can close the "VIN" jumper (near the RST pin of the Mini socket) and you can run the Arduino off the same power supply as your motor.

IF your motor uses less than 7 or more than 12 volts you have to cut the "VIN" jumper and provide a separate power supply for the Arduino since the regulator on the Arduino board needs at least 7V and gets too hot if used with more then 12V. You can use motors up to 24V
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hawaii
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Thank you, johnwasser for a very helpful reply. Another question, are heat sinks necessary with this design? I'm under the impression that they aren't needed and the arduino will realize when it is too hot.

Also how would I get the motors to react based off the values I receive from a digital distance sensor?

Thanks again,
Ejay
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Are heat sinks necessary with this design? I'm under the impression that they aren't needed and the arduino will realize when it is too hot.

Also how would I get the motors to react based off the values I receive from a digital distance sensor?
You just have to keep the Arduino out of very hot environments.  Somewhere it should say what the limits are but temperatures that are comfortable for people are usually well within the limits that a microprocessor can stand.  The motor controller may benefit from a heatsink if it is driving a motor close to its power limit.

You can control the motor by setting direction and speed as shown above. You write a sketch to read from the distance sensor, calculate direction and speed values from that input, and control the motor.
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