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Topic: Remove 328P and place it in a breadboard? (Read 649 times) previous topic - next topic

jhjhjh0

Hi everybody. Sorry if this is a repeated question, but I am still unsure after searching...

If I have an ATmega328P that is already bootloaded, programmed, and working on an Arduino, can I simply remove it from the Arduino board and put it on a breadboard? -given a crystal (16MHz) and two capacitors (18-22 pF ceramic) are also connected to the 328P on the breadboard?

I've seen the Arduino to Breadboard tutorial, but I don't need to reprogram it...

Digikey PN's:
crystal - 300-8499-ND
cap's - 399-1926-ND


Just in case anyone comes across this needing help with burning the bootloader, I finally had success using Kimio Kosaka's tutorial: http://www.geocities.jp/arduino_diecimila/bootloader/index_en.html
Unfortunately, it does not work with the Uno. It worked just fine with my Duemilanove.


Jack Christensen

Yes that can be done. Add a couple 100nF caps from Vcc to GND, I usually put one on each side of the chip just for good luck. Also a 100nF from AREF to GND.

Crystal looks good, cap should work, there's a minimum quantity of 500 on that one, and it's a 200V unit which is fine, but more than needed, and the lead spacing is 5mm. I'd prefer something more like DK # 478-4848-ND, which is 27pF, I know everyone uses 22pF and I'd bet money they'll work fine, but for a crystal that needs 18pF load capacitance, 27pF capacitors get closer to that.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Nick Gammon

I did exactly that here:

http://gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11109

You should probably add a couple of decoupling capacitor to avoid noise problems.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

jhjhjh0

Thanks for the confirmation and advice, Jack. That is exactly what I needed.

Thanks for posting your example, Nick. That is a nice setup and I'll definitely try it.

Jack Christensen


Thanks for the confirmation and advice, Jack. That is exactly what I needed.

Thanks for posting your example, Nick. That is a nice setup and I'll definitely try it.


@Nick, $6.50 is a bit high for an ATmega328P:
http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Atmel/ATMEGA328P-PU/?qs=K8BHR703ZXguOQv3sKbWcg%3d%3d

@jhjhjh0, my solderless breadboard attempt here (2nd picture down):
http://adventuresinarduinoland.blogspot.com/2011/09/arduino-breadboard-helpers.html
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

Nick Gammon

Oh?

http://au.element14.com/atmel/atmega328p-pu/mcu-8bit-avr-32k-flash-28pdip/dp/1715487

The in-stock ones are only $AUD 11.10 as I write this. At today's exchange rate that is $US 11.87.

But that's the price you pay for living in Australia. Shipping costs, old chap, shipping costs.

Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Brad Burleson


I did exactly that here:

http://gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11109

You should probably add a couple of decoupling capacitor to avoid noise problems.


Hey Nick-

Nice work, very clean.  I've got to learn more about wire wrapping - I've got the tool and the wire, but I've just been soldering the wire on non-wire wrap parts (and of course, not using the tool itself).  Works great for me now, but I'm sure I'm missing something.

This is probably a stupid question, but I've never seen a 10k resistor used on pin 2 before - I've always wired my TX/RX lines straight thru to the FTDI connector.  Can you explain why you've added this?

Thanks,

Brad.

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