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Topic: Where did you start with Micro controllers? (Read 7 times) previous topic - next topic

Osgeld

#45
Feb 14, 2012, 02:12 am Last Edit: Feb 14, 2012, 02:14 am by Osgeld Reason: 1
Quote
I suspect whatever tech the newspapers are using these days to print their papers is what is state of the art in high speed printing. I suspect the days of setting lead type is long gone.  smiley-wink


last I looked (and this was 10 years ago) they were etching large sheets, wrapping them on a drum and running the presses from that using an offset process (ink on plate transfers to big rubber drum which mashes the image on paper)

retrolefty


Quote
I suspect whatever tech the newspapers are using these days to print their papers is what is state of the art in high speed printing. I suspect the days of setting lead type is long gone.  smiley-wink


last I looked (and this was 10 years ago) they were etching large sheets, wrapping them on a drum and running the presses from that using an offset process (ink on plate transfers to big rubber drum which mashes the image on paper)


This looks like a pretty hi-tec printer: http://www.biz.konicaminolta.com/production/c7000_c6000/index.html

Lefty


westfw

Quote
Printronix did make one the earliest 'dot matrix' printers in 132 column version. Dec also made an early 132 column dot matrix for their minicomputer systems, the famous LA-36 printer.

The Printronix I'm thinking of was a high-speed lineprinter replacement with an entire row (?) of dots.
The LA36 was a terminal (keyboard/etc), ran at 30cps, and had the more typical arrangement with a single column of dots on a moving printhead...

LA36 Engineering manual: http://www.pdp8online.com/pdp8cgi/query_docs/queryb.pl?level=1LA36;id=522

retrolefty


Quote
Printronix did make one the earliest 'dot matrix' printers in 132 column version. Dec also made an early 132 column dot matrix for their minicomputer systems, the famous LA-36 printer.

The Printronix I'm thinking of was a high-speed lineprinter replacement with an entire row (?) of dots.
The LA36 was a terminal (keyboard/etc), ran at 30cps, and had the more typical arrangement with a single column of dots on a moving printhead...

LA36 Engineering manual: http://www.pdp8online.com/pdp8cgi/query_docs/queryb.pl?level=1LA36;id=522



Here is the picture of the Printronix I worked on a little, but don't recall the exact hammer arrangement, seem to recall something spinning pretty fast inside, but then again there were so many different printers back at the time.

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=printronix&hl=en&sa=X&rlz=1T4GGLL_enUS373US373&biw=1055&bih=720&tbm=isch&prmd=imvns&tbnid=eq-_kQsJQQiOPM:&imgrefurl=http://www.fib.upc.edu/retroinformatica/exposicio/ordinadors/Printronix-P600.html%3Flang%3Dca&docid=-GQooXnZlvA-7M&imgurl=http://www.fib.upc.edu/retroinformatica/exposicio/ordinadors/Printronix-P600/mainColumnParagraphs/0/image/IMG_2158%252520(Custom).JPG&w=620&h=827&ei=7dI5T_rTIYOZiQKqmZSTDA&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=63&sig=108332181031703398911&page=3&tbnh=167&tbnw=119&start=35&ndsp=18&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:35&tx=52&ty=70

Osgeld


This looks like a pretty hi-tec printer: http://www.biz.konicaminolta.com/production/c7000_c6000/index.html

Lefty


maybe, reminds me of just a couple months ago I was working a seasonal temp job at a lab that did most of the school portraits in the country, they had a very large room with similar style printers (not that I have an exact count but off of memory 10 of them) which used laser + chemical processes to print on light sensitive photographic paper.

We also had a couple very large format inkjet plotters to print on canvas, massive nasty looking old school photo drum printer things that could turn out a 1 foot tall stack of color photos in a matter of seconds, and their newest machines some HP indigo presses, which in a nutshell were 7 foot tall color plastic film printers.


https://www.google.com/search?q=hp+indigo&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en&tbm=isch&source=og&sa=N&tab=wi&ei=r9Q5T9uPG46ctwfm__3dCg&biw=1280&bih=920&sei=sdQ5T9zwNcKItwfagsj3Cg

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