Go Down

Topic: integrated circuits (Read 757 times) previous topic - next topic

frighowler

hi all. complete nubie here. please move post if inapropriate.
i'm at the stage of making an led blink so don't expect any progress on this any time soon.

two questions, first question is can the arduino be configured to test integrated circuits?
i've been given a bag of old circuit boards and with them was a load of ICs mostly dip14 4000 series (i looked this up as i said i'm clueless).
they were kept in a shed, so there's a good chance they are nackered but you never know. presumably you would have to reconfigure the wiring as appropriate for each type but can it be done and (preferably) has someone done it?

second question is what can i do with then if they work.
short list, 4001, 4009 4011, 4013, 4049, 4053, 4066, there are more but these are the ones i have most of, especialy 4053s and 4066s.
not too bothered about this, presumably in the future i'll be able to figure out what those datasheets were talking about.
thanks all.

retrolefty


hi all. complete nubie here. please move post if inapropriate.
i'm at the stage of making an led blink so don't expect any progress on this any time soon.

two questions, first question is can the arduino be configured to test integrated circuits?
i've been given a bag of old circuit boards and with them was a load of ICs mostly dip14 4000 series (i looked this up as i said i'm clueless).
they were kept in a shed, so there's a good chance they are nackered but you never know. presumably you would have to reconfigure the wiring as appropriate for each type but can it be done and (preferably) has someone done it?

Sounds like a do able project. Just use a shield proto board and mount a 14 pin IC socket on it. The arduino has 19 programmable digital I/O pins (including the analog input pins used as digital). Most of your effort will go into the
software for the proper testing algorithum for each chip type you want to be able to test.

second question is what can i do with then if they work.
short list, 4001, 4009 4011, 4013, 4049, 4053, 4066, there are more but these are the ones i have most of, especialy 4053s and 4066s.
not too bothered about this, presumably in the future i'll be able to figure out what those datasheets were talking about.

Try and find a copy of the old 'CMOS cookbook' by don lancaster, it's loaded with information of this chip family and circuit ideas.

Lefty


thanks all.

frighowler

thanks, your a gentleman.

Go Up