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Topic: OT:server rack enclosure - how to seal wires to air leakage? (Read 2031 times) previous topic - next topic

MattS-UK

the enclosure is in my basement and there is a wood stove down there (ash dust), so the air coming in needs to be filtered. so what is the best way to non-permanently seal around the wires?
The usual way to seal around cable bundles is to use a rubber 'disk' with an X cut through the middle.  It is not an air tight seal but it rarely needs to be. 

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I was thinking of changing it to a positive pressure, negating the need to seal the wires, but the rack enclosure is mostly built, so it would be a major pain in the *** to change it now.
In dusty environments positive pressure is usually more effective, as the outward pressure aids airflow through the chassis and pushes polluted air away from any vent in the cabinet.  When I was building server cabinets for installation in  industrial premises after a bit of experimenting, we ended up turning the fans over in the fan tray to create a top down positive pressure.  In a really dusty environment, I would imagine the challenge would be filtering the inlet to the fan tray whilst maintaining sufficient airflow downstream.   


travis_farmer

The usual way to seal around cable bundles is to use a rubber 'disk' with an X cut through the middle.  It is not an air tight seal but it rarely needs to be. 
In dusty environments positive pressure is usually more effective, as the outward pressure aids airflow through the chassis and pushes polluted air away from any vent in the cabinet.  When I was building server cabinets for installation in  industrial premises after a bit of experimenting, we ended up turning the fans over in the fan tray to create a top down positive pressure.  In a really dusty environment, I would imagine the challenge would be filtering the inlet to the fan tray whilst maintaining sufficient airflow downstream.   


alright, settled, positive pressure it is.

for filtering, i am using a 16" X 20" furnace filter rated for plant pollen. i figure the surface area should be enough to allow good airflow. and rather than fans, i am using a medium sized 12V furnace blower from a camper furnace. that way if the demand is high, i can increase the PWM to the motor driver.

I think too, i will adapt the code for the fan controller so that it will run constantly at a low speed to maintain fresh air.

~Travis
"A problem clearly stated, is a problem half solved" - Fortune Cookie.
Server Rack monitor: starting implementation
DCC++ Train layout: On hold, pending space

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