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Topic: Your latest purchase (Read 124640 times) previous topic - next topic

Constantin

Here you go!


You are amazing. I wish I had known about either source. Much less waiting and the price is similar.

westfw

Look at what arrived, all within the last few "business days" (one on thursday, one on friday, one on monday, I think.)

(more pictures at the flickr page...)

Graynomad

Now what are you going to do :)

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

Osgeld

if its anything like the evalbot, your going to go to their website and hunt down the full stellarisware installer so you have the utilities that they require you to use but didnt include on the package specific install

just a heads up
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

westfw

Quote
Now what are you going to do

Sigh.  I have two problems:

1) I really don't have any projects in mind that need more performance than I can get out of an AVR.  So ARM is out there as the "must know" technology, and yet ... I don't really need it.  At least, this round of boards is starting to fulfill the promise of 32bit systems reaching the price point of 8bit systems.  If it's a choice between a $30 Teensy and a $30 Arduino, the choice is harder than picking between a $30 Arduino and a $50 Maple...

2) I'm a Mac.  Well, I'm not really STRONGLY Mac-centric, but my main computer is a Mac, and it is somewhat unexpectedly painful to give it up to go use one of the PCs or VMs instead.  This is one of the things that attracted me to Arduino in the first place: "You mean I don't have to spend the first couple of weeks just trying to make the tools work?  Sold!"  I already have CCS (ti), and CW (freescale), and AS6 (atmel) downloaded to the windows laptop, and they're sorta painful.  (The teensyduino SW is nice, though.)


Osgeld

the windows lockdown is the worst part of most development tools, there are GNU TI tools but OMFG ... least their uploader program works with wine so you dont have to fire up a term, type in a novel of a command line, open up a new term, telnet to it, and then give the commands to erase and upload

but you will spend a week fussing around getting an old version of eclipse working with a hard to find plugin, matching versions, editing enviroments and general bullshit just to upload "hello world"
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

Graynomad

Quote
but you will spend a week fussing around getting an old version of eclipse working with a hard to find plugin, matching versions, editing enviroments and general bullshit just to upload "hello world"

I'm really really over that crap these days, spent half a lifetime frigging with paths and environment variables, and makefiles etc etc. Now I want a turn key environment or as near as damn it and I won't look at anything that's more trouble than that.

The Arduino is that of course and also I have been very happy with the LPC Xpresso environment. Not quite as easy but very close.

The SAM38XE looks like a great chip, if things turn out OK with the Due (and we get a proper IDE one way or another) I'll probably drop the LPCs.

_____
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

cjdelphi

I bought 10 shift registers and 5 flip flops for a whopping 4 dollars from ebay... thought they might come in handy one day,

westfw

Also bought a spot in Atmel's upcoming training seminar.  $99 should get me a day of class, lunch, an xmegaA3U Explained board, a jtagice3, and the syllabus look like it involves moving an app from xmega to sam3x, do it should provide useful data on whether the xmegas are "skippable"

Graynomad

Quote
whether the xmegas are "skippable"

I'm not overly familiar with the xmegas but I'd say they are skippable and ARM skills have to be more bankable these days.

______
Rob
Rob Gray aka the GRAYnomad www.robgray.com

JoeN

#370
Oct 02, 2012, 08:42 pm Last Edit: Oct 02, 2012, 08:47 pm by JoeN Reason: 1
My Raspberry Pi apparently shipped from Newark.  I wonder how hard it will be to get some simple GPIO routines going on it and see how fast it can pump out a square wave.

Ah, this guy already has the idea:

http://codeandlife.com/2012/07/03/benchmarking-raspberry-pi-gpio-speed/

21.9 MHz square wave.  Pretty decent.  Was actually hoping for better based on the 700Mhz reported speed of the Raspberry Pi CPU.  Arduino can be made to make a 4Mhz square wave at 16Mhz.  Why is the Pi relatively slow?

http://www.billporter.info/ready-set-oscillate-the-fastest-way-to-change-arduino-pins/
I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they would not teach me of in college.

Chagrin

Why is the Pi relatively slow?


If you want to re-run his tests on your own I think it would be interesting to either:
1) Optimize the operating system; shut down all unnecessary processes (notably X), disable networking, etc. and see if you can get more speed.
2) Run multiple instances of the pin toggling program on seperate pins.  One process might be able to toggle a pin at 20MHz, but I'd expect two processes to toggle pins at greater than 10MHz.

GoForSmoke

Ahhhh, the difference an OS makes. Is there an M$ Windoze for the PI?
Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

JoeN


Why is the Pi relatively slow?


If you want to re-run his tests on your own I think it would be interesting to either:
1) Optimize the operating system; shut down all unnecessary processes (notably X), disable networking, etc. and see if you can get more speed.
2) Run multiple instances of the pin toggling program on seperate pins.  One process might be able to toggle a pin at 20MHz, but I'd expect two processes to toggle pins at greater than 10MHz.


I'm not sure I agree with you a hundred percent on your computer architecture work, there, Chagrin.  Operating systems don't just slow down the system a certain percentage all the time, the OS is either being executed or one of the user processes is, at least on a single core system.  So a user process runs at 100% until the OS runs at 100%, you will see it run full speed and then not at all when something else is running.  There is no way to swap it in and out so fast that you would just get the smooth set of square waves shown in my link.   For the same reason, two processes will make no difference at all on a single core system.  In fact, I see no way two cores could share the same IO pin anyway, they would step all over each other, you wouldn't get a faster wave, you would get a freaking mess with the pin shorting itself a great deal of the time, not that any architecture would allow for this.


I have only come here seeking knowledge. Things they would not teach me of in college.

GoForSmoke

I think that you can get a minimal OS to run its tasks always quicker than a certain length of time and be able to count on your task to run at some frequency. Maybe that can be tuned with a tunable OS?

Also, I've programmed and run a whole lot to run on single-tasking (sometimes with TSR's) DOS and there's a lot to be said about your program having the system to itself. Like being able to run a business on 10 Mz and slower 8080 to 8088 CPU's, or 16 Mz 80286 with terminals... at all.
DOS is an OS.

Nick Gammon on multitasking Arduinos:
1) http://gammon.com.au/blink
2) http://gammon.com.au/serial
3) http://gammon.com.au/interrupts

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