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Topic: Your latest purchase (Read 232077 times) previous topic - next topic

Paul__B

#735
Nov 16, 2013, 01:30 pm Last Edit: Nov 16, 2013, 01:31 pm by Paul__B Reason: 1
Very nice - love the  laser-cut box and it really looks the modern-day part to the old laboratory boxen - but I don't think I could justify the price for the infrequent times I would use it and the battery would run flat for the same reason, which is not good for Li-Polys as I understand.

Given that most digital multimeters have ranges based on "2", it seems only the 10V output is really useful.  (OK, I suppose you use the 2.5V for calibrating Arduinos, eh?)  I note its integral power converter.

Thus provoked, I could consider building one with a different reference and calibrating it from someone's reference - as that one is in the descriptions.  Of course you can say it's not worth the trouble - just buy it!

Interestingly - your photo shows 5 mm LEDs and I thought the pictures on eBay showed SMD.

Nick Gammon

Good point, it's not identical to the one in the photo on the page I bought it. And I must admit I wondered about the power jack, now I see it is for recharging. Assuming they designed it with low consumption in mind that battery should last a long time.

You have to hold down the only button for a few seconds to "start" it, after which a brief click changes the output level.

I don't know how you know if it needs charging, all the documentation I received is visible in the photo.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Nick Gammon

I don't know about "much more" complicated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/555_timer_IC

Quote

Depending on the manufacturer, the standard 555 package includes 25 transistors, 2 diodes and 15 resistors ...


This kit has 26 transistors, no diodes and 16 resistors. So about the same complexity.

http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/652-555kit

Datasheet available at that link.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

JoeN


I don't know about "much more" complicated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/555_timer_IC

Quote

Depending on the manufacturer, the standard 555 package includes 25 transistors, 2 diodes and 15 resistors ...


This kit has 26 transistors, no diodes and 16 resistors. So about the same complexity.

http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/652-555kit

Datasheet available at that link.


Hmmm...  Thirty cents or thirty dollars... :smiley-eek-blue:

Still, it looks kinda fun.
I will never ask you to do anything that I wouldn't do myself.

Constantin

I was very naughty and finally bought a standalone oscilloscope, the Owen SDS7102 for $365 with a free case over at Saelig. Still looking for a reasonably-priced signal generator whose output frequencies do not have to exceed 60Hz. All the stuff they have there is either way over spec or not standalone.

AWOL

Quote
Still looking for a reasonably-priced signal generator whose output frequencies do not have to exceed 60Hz

You can buy AD9850-based devices for about $5 each, with roughly 10mHz resolution up to 40MHz.
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

AWOL

Quote
it is not a signal generator,

I'm sorry - you're saying a sinusoid isn't a signal?
Did you mean to say it isn't a function generator?
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

waterlubber

Some miscillanious relays for my rocket launcher controller. You've heard of it. Cmon. Goto errors and the lot...:333
waterlubber
Codes in: C++, Python, some VB, winDOS, YAML
Likes cake and arduino. And minecraft.

JimboZA

Mr and Mrs Crossroads' book... I'm still a teen at heart. Local supplier hopes it's in next weeks consignment.

Another local supplier is waiting for some protoplastic, and I hope they'll remember I want some of it.
Johannesburg hams call me: ZS6JMB on Highveld rep 145.7875 (-600 & 88.5 tone)
Dr Perry Cox: "Help me to help you, help me to help you...."
Your answer may already be here: https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=384198.0

Nick Gammon

Yes I got my copy a few days ago:



It is written by Bob and Kathleen Patterson (CrossRoads and wife).

Saying it is "for teens" is probably an understatement. There is a lot of reference material in this book, including stuff like how to read a datasheet, confronting installation problems, interrupts, watchdog timer, interpreting part numbers, choosing types for C programs, EEPROM, SPI, I2C, and quite a lot more.

There are example circuits, example code, and a lot of other detail.

Let me put it this way: a great number of questions you might have about designing circuits, and writing code, are explained in this book. And if you are unfamiliar with electronics fundamentals, a lot of that is covered as well.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Pedro147

#745
Dec 04, 2013, 08:34 am Last Edit: Dec 04, 2013, 08:42 am by Pedro147 Reason: 1
A glowing recommendation Nick. You should do all Crossroads PR - Nice critique  XD

Edit - Nick, you did such a good job that I just put my order in at fishpond.com.au. That's what I call global infiltration
http://www.pedroduino.com

Constantin


Quote
Still looking for a reasonably-priced signal generator whose output frequencies do not have to exceed 60Hz

You can buy AD9850-based devices for about $5 each, with roughly 10mHz resolution up to 40MHz.


Thank you, AWOL for the suggestion. There is a plethora out there, next step will be finding one that can handle up to +/-10Vpp and so on. Some seem to offer on-board amplifiers for that. Thanks again.

microcat

#747
Dec 06, 2013, 01:02 pm Last Edit: Dec 06, 2013, 10:39 pm by microcat Reason: 1
Got one of these puppies a while back.
https://www.olimex.com/Products/AVR/Development/AVR-CAN/

It is being used as a prototyping board for a work project, made necessary because I exhausted the capabilities of an ATMega328P/MCP2515 combination.  While the board is an excellent design and well-made, I should caution that it is not very "Arduino friendly".    If you are good with microcontrollers, and are looking for a challenge, this would be a candidate worth considering.  On the other hand, if you are new to uC's and Arduino, this cat would probably not be the best choice.

Nick Gammon

Diavolino:



It has a similar form factor to the Uno / Duemilanove, but since it doesn't have the USB chip it is cheaper than a Uno (around $US 12).

http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/180-diavolino

You program via FTDI cable (or the ICSP header). The ICSP header and the chip socket were not part of the kit. Since it doesn't have the USB chip or a power LED it would be suitable for low-power applications.
Please post technical questions on the forum, not by personal message. Thanks!

More info:
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

liudr

I order crossroad's book and another book on wireless network stuff to learn xbee.
Also ordered a dell computer from MS online store for my new year of contract work. Nice, ah?
One display corner has splitting open seam and the entire screen is warped (not flat). Supposed to be new.
Serial LCD keypad panel,phi_prompt user interface library,SDI-12 USB Adapter

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