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Topic: Your latest purchase (Read 116 times) previous topic - next topic

pico

#930
Jun 06, 2014, 03:47 am Last Edit: Jun 06, 2014, 03:53 am by pico Reason: 1

I have been really stupid on this site.no paypal no visa. Direct bank transfer.
Another 30 euro costs.
....
I know .... hard lesson, won't do it again.

Jantje


I'm a bit confused by this. Aliexpress certainly offer payment via Visa or Mastercard, among other options. (No Paypal though.) I've always used a Mastercard for payment.

Sounds like you weren't actually buying through Aliexpress, but rather directly from the company (Topband)?

Either that, or perhaps you were going through Alibaba rather than Aliexpress (which is more wholesale/b2b oriented, rather than Aliexpress, which is more ebay-like and retail oriented. Prices and "minimum buy" quantities generally reflect that, too.)
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pico


The Arduino Zero announcement got me all excited,


What aspect(s) in particular?
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Jack Christensen



The Arduino Zero announcement got me all excited,


What aspect(s) in particular?


Thought the SAM D20/D21 MCUs were pretty interesting.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

pico

#933
Jun 06, 2014, 06:27 am Last Edit: Jun 06, 2014, 07:13 am by pico Reason: 1

Thought the SAM D20/D21 MCUs were pretty interesting.


What aspect(s) in particular?

(Sorry, I had a  quick look through the datasheet and didn't actually spot anything particularly stand-out that caught my attention, but perhaps I missed something.)

For M0-class devices I'm quite impressed with the NXP "switch matrix" for IO pin function configuration.Just such a cool and clever (and even useful!) feature. I've been playing with some LPC810 8-pin DIPs, looking at them as alternative to ATtiny85s for some applications.

Unfortunately, NXP only offer one other LPC in a DIP package, the LPC1114, which is nice, but only offers 32KB flash and 4KB ram, so apart from being faster (50MHz), doesn't offer much more than a 328-class device, really. Otherwise I'd be all over it.

The free LPCXpresso programming environment is decent enough, too, although a bit too "Eclipsy" for my taste (which is not surprising since the code base is derived from Eclipse, apparently.)

Moving up the ARM foodchain a bit I'm really impressed with what Paul Stoffregen has done with his latest Teensy 3.1 offering. Even 5V tolerant digital IO pins! Just too much bang for buck. It almost hurts to read the datasheet. :-)
WiFi shields/Yun too expensive? Embeddedcoolness.com is now selling the RFXduino nRF24L01+ <-> TCP/IP Linux gateway: Simpler, more affordable, and even more powerful wireless Internet connectivity for *all* your Arduino projects! (nRF24L01+ shield and dev board kits available too.)

GoForSmoke

Got my Official PJRC Teensy 3.1 through OSH Park, they're still on sale for $17 ea. Shipping ran me less than $3.
One minor PITA was having to get cables to fit, I got a multi-pack of cellphone cables, the USB plug is tiny.
I find it harder to express logic in English than in Code.
Sometimes an example says more than many times as many words.

Jantje


I'm a bit confused by this. Aliexpress certainly offer payment via Visa or Mastercard, among other options. (No Paypal though.) I've always used a Mastercard for payment.

Sounds like you weren't actually buying through Aliexpress, but rather directly from the company (Topband)?

Either that, or perhaps you were going through Alibaba rather than Aliexpress (which is more wholesale/b2b oriented, rather than Aliexpress, which is more ebay-like and retail oriented. Prices and "minimum buy" quantities generally reflect that, too.)


Sorry my bad.
I went through Alibaba and then via mail directly. Therefore Alibaba doesn't even know about this deal. As a result I can't even complain or give negative feedback on Alibaba.
I know
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ViF6JRNjTk&feature=kp
Best regards
Jantje
Do not PM me a question unless you are prepared to pay for consultancy.
Nederlandse sectie - http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/board,77.0.html -

Jack Christensen



Thought the SAM D20/D21 MCUs were pretty interesting.


What aspect(s) in particular?


The SAM Ds also have a switch matrix feature which I thought was cool. As are the multiple SERCOM modules, each of which can be configured as SPI, I2C, serial, etc. Bang-for-the-buck is fairly amazing, the top end SAM D20 is under $5 in single quantities, has 256kB flash and 32kB SRAM, and the smaller versions go for half that. I thought the AVRs were pretty reasonably priced, but a 32-bit 48MHz ARM with more and better peripherals makes them seem relatively expensive!

I've looked at the LPC812 as well, and it is also pretty impressive. I was hoping that with the Atmel MCUs, there might be less of a learning curve given that I was pretty comfortable with the AVRs. Not too sure about that now, I should know better than to believe the marketing hype. I'm just starting to explore the ASF doc, lots to digest there, basically a whole layer of APIs to interface to the hardware. It's either that or digest the entire datasheet, which is formidable, then program down to the bare metal. Of course I didn't learn AVRs in a day either. But the SAM chip is more complex in every way. I was looking at the ports last night, instead of three registers that the AVRs use to control the ports, there are no less than thirteen per port.

So we shall see. I'd be interested to hear what you've done with the LPCs and especially interested in how you got up to speed with them. I see that NXP has LPCOpen which I think might correspond to ASF, at least roughly. I think I've got everything I need for the SAM D20 now, took just a bit to find all the parts and there's a lot of learning ahead still of course. Google has not been my friend, there just does not seem to be a lot of learning resources out there for the SAM Ds.
MCP79411/12 RTC ... "One Million Ohms" ATtiny kit ... available at http://www.tindie.com/stores/JChristensen/

pico

#937
Jun 06, 2014, 06:03 pm Last Edit: Jun 06, 2014, 06:06 pm by pico Reason: 1



Thought the SAM D20/D21 MCUs were pretty interesting.


What aspect(s) in particular?


The SAM Ds also have a switch matrix feature which I thought was cool.


There you go, I missed that (and I was actually looking for it.)

I'm actually a bit surprised at what Atmel are doing in their ARM line, and perhaps this prejudices me somewhat. To me, they seem to be a bit left-footed somehow in producing a line of chips which synergize well with their AVR line. For example, everyone seems to offer 5V tolerant IO pins on the ARM uCs-- except Atmel! That strikes me as downright odd.

It's been my feeling since the Due that the only reason to choose the ATmel ARM chips for the next generation Arduinos is because of the business relationship Arduino has with Atmel, rather than the technical merits of their ARM chips.I like AVR and I like ARM -- I'm just not been in love with Atmel ARM (so far, anyway.)


Bang-for-the-buck is fairly amazing, the top end SAM D20 is under $5 in single quantities, has 256kB flash and 32kB SRAM, and the smaller versions go for half that. I thought the AVRs were pretty reasonably priced, but a 32-bit 48MHz ARM with more and better peripherals makes them seem relatively expensive!


I think that's true across the industry for the ARM uCs, just amazing bang for buck, which is why I think they are becoming so dominant.


I've looked at the LPC812 as well, and it is also pretty impressive. I was hoping that with the Atmel MCUs, there might be less of a learning curve given that I was pretty comfortable with the AVRs. Not too sure about that now, I should know better than to believe the marketing hype.


Yeah, I think ARM is ARM to a certain extent; you learn the architecture, not the manufacturer so much. I think what varies from manufacturer to manufacturer is the quality of the tools, though. Speaking of which, Atmel have recently released a new very affordable range of debuggers (the "-ICE" range) that cover both AVR and ARM targets. If I was going to get into Atmel ARM, I'd definitely spring for one.


I'm just starting to explore the ASF doc, lots to digest there, basically a whole layer of APIs to interface to the hardware. It's either that or digest the entire datasheet, which is formidable, then program down to the bare metal. Of course I didn't learn AVRs in a day either. But the SAM chip is more complex in every way. I was looking at the ports last night, instead of three registers that the AVRs use to control the ports, there are no less than thirteen per port.


Yup, which is why I suspect that the old 8-bitters will never die away completely. Sometimes that relative simplicity is a definite plus. Paradoxically though, they may get more and more expensive, relatively speaking!


So we shall see. I'd be interested to hear what you've done with the LPCs and especially interested in how you got up to speed with them. I see that NXP has LPCOpen which I think might correspond to ASF, at least roughly. I think I've got everything I need for the SAM D20 now, took just a bit to find all the parts and there's a lot of learning ahead still of course. Google has not been my friend, there just does not seem to be a lot of learning resources out there for the SAM Ds.


I'm still at the beginner stage myself with the LPCs, but I've been quite pleased with what I've seen so far. My feeling is that everything has been made as simple as possible by NXP with the tools and online documentation they offer, and so it comes down to just putting the time in. Graynomad (Rob) has put much more time into the LPC stuff I think, and he seems to making good progress with it.

I think you are right that LPCOpen is roughly equivalent to ASF, but I haven't really got into that as yet. I should really decide to do a proper project with one of these things. Learning seems to accelerate quickly when things start to get "real". :-)

Definitely check out those new -ICE debuggers if you haven't already. The only thing I prefer about my AVR Dragon is that it can also do HVP, which the new debuggers can't (they can only do serial and JTAG programming, I think.)
WiFi shields/Yun too expensive? Embeddedcoolness.com is now selling the RFXduino nRF24L01+ <-> TCP/IP Linux gateway: Simpler, more affordable, and even more powerful wireless Internet connectivity for *all* your Arduino projects! (nRF24L01+ shield and dev board kits available too.)

retrolefty

Quote
they seem to be a bit left-footed


Your choice of such a term to signify a negative action might be offensive of those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate, but I'll forgive you just this one time.  ;)

JimboZA


Quote
they seem to be a bit left-footed


Your choice of such a term to signify a negative action might be offensive of those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate, but I'll forgive you just this one time.  ;)


Not for nothing is the Latin for "left", "sinister".....
Roy from ITCrowd: Have you tried turning it off an on again?
I'm on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jimbrownza

retrolefty



Quote
they seem to be a bit left-footed


Your choice of such a term to signify a negative action might be offensive of those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate, but I'll forgive you just this one time.  ;)


Not for nothing is the Latin for "left", "sinister".....


Not for nothing is Latin said to be a dead language.  :D

pico


those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate


I hope you meant "dominant", but in case you really did mean "dominate", it just reinforces my strong suspicions that the lefties among us really need to be kept under the strictest surveillance and control.

Otherwise, things might get "out of hand" quickly, so to speak. ;-)
WiFi shields/Yun too expensive? Embeddedcoolness.com is now selling the RFXduino nRF24L01+ <-> TCP/IP Linux gateway: Simpler, more affordable, and even more powerful wireless Internet connectivity for *all* your Arduino projects! (nRF24L01+ shield and dev board kits available too.)

pico


Not for nothing is the Latin for "left", "sinister".....


Karma bump for the Latinist. :-)
WiFi shields/Yun too expensive? Embeddedcoolness.com is now selling the RFXduino nRF24L01+ <-> TCP/IP Linux gateway: Simpler, more affordable, and even more powerful wireless Internet connectivity for *all* your Arduino projects! (nRF24L01+ shield and dev board kits available too.)

retrolefty



those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate


I hope you meant "dominant", but in case you really did mean "dominate", it just reinforces my strong suspicions that the lefties among us really need to be kept under the strictest surveillance and control.

Otherwise, things might get "out of hand" quickly, so to speak. ;-)



Well you might be one to something.

Quote

As of 2012, three out of the last seven presidents have been left-handed. Counting as far back as Truman, the number is five (or six) out of twelve. In the 1992 election, all three major candidates - George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot - were left-handed.[3] The 1996 election also involved three left-handed candidates: Clinton, Perot, and Bob Dole, who learned to use his left hand after his right hand was paralyzed by a World War II injury. In the 2000 election, democratic candidate Al Gore was also left-handed.[9] Both major-party candidates in the 2008 presidential election - Barack Obama and John McCain - were left-handed.[10] The percentage of the population who are left-handed is about 10%.[4] While some write this trend off as a coincidence, others have tried to come up with scientific explanations. According to Daniel Geschwind, a professor of human genetics at UCLA, in 2008: "Six out of the past 12 presidents is statistically significant and probably means something".[4]
Amar Klar, a scientist who has worked on handedness, says that left-handed people "have a wider scope of thinking", and points to the disproportionately high number of Nobel Prize winners, writers, and painters who are left-handed.[6] Michael Peters, a neuropsychologist at the University of Guelph, points out that left-handed people have to get by in a world adapted to right-handers, something which can give them extra mental resilience.[1] The pattern, however, is not replicated in other countries; only two British post-war prime ministers have been left-handed (David Cameron[11] and James Callaghan).[4] Winston Churchill has often been credited with being a left-hander, although he was not.[12]


Lefty

SirNickity

I've looked at the LPC812 as well, and it is also pretty impressive. I was hoping that with the Atmel MCUs, there might be less of a learning curve given that I was pretty comfortable with the AVRs. Not too sure about that now, I should know better than to believe the marketing hype.


I looked through some of the SAM data sheets hoping for the same thing.  There is a formidable amount of info there, but it is well written and organized -- which incidentally I believe is one of the principle strengths of the AVR line as well.  Graynomad turned me on to LPC, and their data sheets are.... eh..  not as approachable.

In terms of hardware, the Atmel implementations just don't stack up as well.  At least for my purposes.  The flexible serial ports are nice, and they have a dual-core M4 which is pretty sweet.  NXP has a three-core, but it's M4 + M0 + M0.  You lose the second M4 core, which has a substantially improved instruction set, however it can also clock nearly twice as fast (204MHz vs. Atmel's 120MHz.)  And it's like $10 from Digikey.  Yikes that's a lot of power for ten bucks.


Google has not been my friend, there just does not seem to be a lot of learning resources out there for the SAM Ds.


This has been the song of my people in the last few weeks.  Man, it's tough to get started with these things.  At least, it seems that way compared to the AVR world.  There's soooo much documentation, and so many libraries, and plenty of "here's how you open an example project in Eclipse" videos, but not nearly enough of the meat-and-potatoes stuff that I've been looking for.  Conceptual intros (not marketing slides!), toolchain dissection, etc etc.  I managed to upload a demo project to my Xpresso, but I haven't the foggiest notion what actually occurred.   :~


I should really decide to do a proper project with one of these things. Learning seems to accelerate quickly when things start to get "real". :-)


This is how I'm trying to learn, although I probably shouldn't be starting out with such an ambitious project.  Graynomad suggested the LPCs based on some complaints I had trying to accomplish my goals with the ATmega2560, and if I don't crash and burn, it really is a much, MUCH more elegant solution.  So I ended up with an LPC4078 main controller and a pack of LPC812s (with those awesome assignable I/O pins!) as my "Hello World".  Sheesh.  Here's a screen grab of the PCB-in-progress that shall be my development board.  I'm well in over my head, but hey.


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