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Author Topic: Controlling torque of a DC motor  (Read 454 times)
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Hi all, im implementing torque control of a DC motor by varying the PWM pulse into my motor driver. So, am i right to say that the higher the pulse value the higher the torque?
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So, am i right to say that the higher the pulse value the higher the torque?

Not really. Higher the duty cycle of a PWM, the motor will be ON most of the time, lower the duty cycle, the motor will seem less ON, but more OFF.

You need a way to monitor the RPM of the motor, use the signal as a feedback, to control the speed of the motor. 
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Hi all, im implementing torque control of a DC motor by varying the PWM pulse into my motor driver. So, am i right to say that the higher the pulse value the higher the torque?

In general, yes, although determining the relationship may be non-trivial. Is this a rotating motor, or a stationary motor as you referred to on another thread? Predicting the torque of a stalled motor is a very different problem to a spinning motor.
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Torque and speed are 2 different animals. A feedback loop will allow constant RPM. Even with a constant torque motor the RPM will vary depending on load.
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