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Author Topic: reading temperatures at 465+ F  (Read 518 times)
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Hello to the arduino community!

First off I would like to thank everyone in this community for providing so much knowledge! After spending a lot of timing reading through posts and walk through I know feel like i can start  some projects that serve great purpose.
Which leads me to why I am posting today!

My local coffee shop roast their beans in store. And I have been contracted to make a logger for them. Pretty simple and straight forward device. Just gonna log temps and 10 sec intervals and save that data to an sd card. But I am having trouble find a sensor that can read such high temperatures. I am looking for something that can read up 465 to 500 F. I would prefer to keep it as cost effective as possible. These are good friends of mine and want to save them as much money as I can! If anyone knows of a nice kit or something where all the parts i need for the sensor are shipped together and easy to work with I would very much appreciate a link to it!

Thank you in advance to whom ever helps me with this blockade!
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I think I may just answered my own question.

Please correct me if I am wrong, but i could use a AD595A  and follow this schematic(http://reprap.org/wiki/File:Thermocouple_1.0_schematic.png) and just attach a type k thermocouple to it?
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I think I may just answered my own question.

Please correct me if I am wrong, but i could use a AD595A  and follow this schematic(http://reprap.org/wiki/File:Thermocouple_1.0_schematic.png) and just attach a type k thermocouple to it?

At that temperature range you are somewhat limited to thermocouple or RTD sensors. Neither sensor is especially expensive but the proper electronic interfacing is somewhat complex and not cheap. I prefer RTD sensors for their better accuracy. For either sensor the temperature range is dictated by the type of insulation used for the specific sensor obtained, thermocouples are really a +/- 5 degree device especially at elevated temperatures. A thermocouple in theory can read to around 2000 F, but most won't because of the actual wire insulation used, so you should make sure whatever specific sensor, TC or RTD, you select is rated higher then the max temperature it will see in your specific application.

Lefty
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