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Topic: mosfet help (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

jimjam

I have been told I need to use a mosfet to get this working with my arduino as it is controlled with 2-10v
http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/search/productdetail.jsp?CMP=cmwis_email&sku=1936419
I am new to electronics and would be grateful if any one could post a schematic to allow the arduino pwm pin to control this bit of kit, also a link to the farnell site to which mosfet to buy as there are so many different types. I understand I need a logic type.
Any help would be appreciated.

Runaway Pancake

#1
Feb 25, 2012, 04:11 pm Last Edit: Feb 25, 2012, 04:16 pm by runaway_pancake Reason: 1
You were misinformed.
All that it requires is a digital output pin, 0/5V.

*** The "2-10V" means that it's good with a minimum of 0/2V and as much as 0/10V.  So controlling it with 0/5V is a winner. ***
"You gotta fight - for your right - to party!"
Don't react - Read.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
It's "bipolar transistor" or "junction transistor" - "BJT" is stupid.
When all else fails, check your wiring!

jimjam

Are you sure, looking at the data sheet it says this prportional controller will only give 50% power at 5v and 100% at 10v. Or am i reading it totally wrong.

Runaway Pancake

The link you provided is for a solid-state relay.
Its input is 2-10VDC, its output is rated for 240vac.
It's "on" when its input is anywhere between 2 and 10V; it's "off" when its input is 0V.
"You gotta fight - for your right - to party!"
Don't react - Read.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
It's "bipolar transistor" or "junction transistor" - "BJT" is stupid.
When all else fails, check your wiring!

jimjam

no it is a proportional controller here is a link to the data sheet.
http://www.crydom.com/en/Products/Catalog/p_cv.pdf

Runaway Pancake

OK
The link calls it an SSR, but its datasheet has it as a proportional controller.
So, it's different.
"You gotta fight - for your right - to party!"
Don't react - Read.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
It's "bipolar transistor" or "junction transistor" - "BJT" is stupid.
When all else fails, check your wiring!

Runaway Pancake

So, you want/need a means of 0/5V (PWM?) to 0 to 10V variable?
"You gotta fight - for your right - to party!"
Don't react - Read.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
It's "bipolar transistor" or "junction transistor" - "BJT" is stupid.
When all else fails, check your wiring!

jimjam


jimjam


OK
The link calls it an SSR, but its datasheet has it as a proportional controller.
So, it's different.


I think it is a proportional ssr

Runaway Pancake

I wonder if a PWM'ed 0/10V would suffice or if it requires a nice, smooth, 'constant' (within range) DC control voltage.
"You gotta fight - for your right - to party!"
Don't react - Read.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
It's "bipolar transistor" or "junction transistor" - "BJT" is stupid.
When all else fails, check your wiring!

jimjam


I wonder if a PWM'ed 0/10V would suffice or if it requires a nice, smooth, 'constant' (within range) DC control voltage.

im not sure, the data sheet just gives  d\c voltage to power charts

Runaway Pancake

It'd be easy enough to switch (PWM) a transistor, and therefore the controller's input, between 0 and 10V, especially since it's just LED current there.
Smoothing the Arduino PWM (approx 430Hz ?) with a low-pass filter and an op-amp and then amplifying the result (X2) would be more complicated, but hardly impossible.
"You gotta fight - for your right - to party!"
Don't react - Read.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
It's "bipolar transistor" or "junction transistor" - "BJT" is stupid.
When all else fails, check your wiring!

jimjam


It'd be easy enough to switch (PWM) a transistor, and therefore the controller's input, between 0 and 10V, especially since it's just LED current there.
Smoothing the Arduino PWM (approx 430Hz ?) with a low-pass filter and an op-amp and then amplifying the result (X2) would be more complicated, but hardly impossible.


can I have the easy option please as the other has gone straight over my head.

Runaway Pancake

#13
Feb 25, 2012, 05:15 pm Last Edit: Feb 25, 2012, 05:24 pm by runaway_pancake Reason: 1
OK.
Attached is a drawing for the first (easiest) option.
The transistor is just a "garden variety" NPN.

***  "Ordinary" SSRs need a load on the output - without a load the output will always show high-voltage (assuming use of a modern DVM) regardless the control state.  ***
"You gotta fight - for your right - to party!"
Don't react - Read.
"Who is like unto the beast? who is able to make war with him?"
It's "bipolar transistor" or "junction transistor" - "BJT" is stupid.
When all else fails, check your wiring!

jimjam


OK.
Attached is a drawing for the first (easiest) option.
The transistor is just a "garden variety" NPN.

***  "Ordinary" SSRs need a load on the output - without a load the output will always show high-voltage (assuming use of a modern DVM) regardless the control state.  ***


Excuse me for being a bit thick but is that a battery on the schematic?

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