Go Down

Topic: Dealing with motor regeneration with a switch mode PSU (Read 80 times) previous topic - next topic

plus1etal

Hey all,
I'm working on a project that needs to be plugged into the wall, and I'm using a 12V brushed motor.  I've been trying to figure out how to deal with the problem of regeneration - the motor drivers I'm looking into all have braking capabilities, and I want to be able to utilize that.  However, the braking introduces the problem of regeneration, which a switch mode power supply does not like.

From what I've read it might not be a problem - the drivers are 28V max, and I'm only driving at 12V, so the voltage increase across the PSU rail might not be enough to hurt the driver.  But I'm not confident about that, and I don't want to kill a 50 dollar driver to find out.

I've read that maybe placing a battery pack in parallel with the power supply could do the trick?

Any thoughts, ideas?

jackrae

Or you could fit a normally-forward-biased blocking diode in the output of the PSU,  Apart from losing around 0.7 volts, when regen occurs the diode will be reverse biased

jackrae

Or you could fit a normally-forward-biased blocking diode in the output of the PSU,  Apart from losing around 0.7 volts, when regen occurs the diode will be reverse biased

oops  double posting

plus1etal

But the energy has to go SOMEWHERE, right?  Where would it go with a biasing diode?

MarkT

You don't get any significant braking with a diode, in fact you might get really high voltages as
the H-bridge acts in reverse as a boost converter - the energy has to go somewhere.

The standard motor controller method is to have a dump resistor across the DC rail with a chopper
circuit to dump current into it as the voltage rail rises above a threshold...
[ I will NOT respond to personal messages, I WILL delete them, use the forum please ]

Go Up
 


Please enter a valid email to subscribe

Confirm your email address

We need to confirm your email address.
To complete the subscription, please click the link in the email we just sent you.

Thank you for subscribing!

Arduino
via Egeo 16
Torino, 10131
Italy