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Topic: Raspberry Pi launch farce (Read 21 times) previous topic - next topic

AWOL

I can remember the hype before the BBC micro was launched (I'd just graduated).
My flatmate managed to borrow a prototype for a weekend.

We expected storing and loading programs to and from cassette to be slow, because it was the same on our NASCOMs and our homebrews, and we knew the limitations of the hardware we'd built.
What we didn't expect was how easy it was to write programs that drew stuff and made sounds.

OK, it ran only BASIC when we'd moved on from there in our careers, but I can remember getting very little sleep those few days, because most of what we wanted to do and try simply worked.

I'm not feeling the excitement with the Pi, and I really wanted to.
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

Nick Gammon

I feel a bit of sympathy for the developers. They are probably releasing it before they really want to, because the hype has made people beg them to do it.

It would be good if it came with the SD card pre-installed (I believe some versions do) and the power-pack, and it "just worked".

But to supply it with a micro-USB for power and then say "don't plug this into a USB port" seems strange, to me.
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Grumpy_Mike

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I'm not feeling the excitement with the Pi, and I really wanted to.

Yes spot on, it is a very big disappointment so far.

People are hungry for it. I have had 30K viewings of my Glockenspiel video in just over a week.

Anyway my latest installment of my "this is utter crap" rant:-

9) After five and a half hours stopped it with a control C and found out I couldn't ping anything. Rebooted and I could ping tried again, this time I got a message saying my certificates or time was not correct.
10) Rebooted, reloaded the certificates, reset the time and tried again. Got an error message saying a file was not found but otherwise it was successful. Googled the error message and it seems it always does that, so proceeded to reboot.
11) IT WILL NOT REBOOT!!!!
12) Googled that and found out this is because of a corrupt file that needs deleting and another one needs replacing. The snag is you need a Linux machine or windows machine to do that. I am on a Mac.
13) To my surprise I was able to change the files on the Mac. However, no surprise when it still did not boot.

So a bricked Pi at the moment.

Osgeld

12: virtualbox (though I have no real clue why you couldnt do it on a mac, windows and linux dont play nice when it comes to file encoding, and mac is unix based ... seems abit ass backwards to me)
http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?action=unread;boards=2,3,4,5,67,6,7,8,9,10,11,66,12,13,15,14,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,86,87,89,1;ALL

Claghorn


I'm genuinely curious as to what their target audience is.


If it were to work reliably, I could see using it as a media PC with an big external USB drive for content. I have seen reports of mplayer operating at least a little on it.
http://home.comcast.net/~tomhorsley/hardware/arduino/arduino.html

Nick Gammon


9) After five and a half hours stopped it with a control C and found out I couldn't ping anything. Rebooted and I could ping tried again, this time I got a message saying my certificates or time was not correct.


I found that, on booting, it would sometimes bring up the network, and not at other times.

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12) Googled that and found out this is because of a corrupt file that needs deleting and another one needs replacing. The snag is you need a Linux machine or windows machine to do that. I am on a Mac.


I would have thought you could mount the image somehow on the Mac, but perhaps not.
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Grumpy_Mike

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I would have thought you could mount the image somehow on the Mac, but perhaps not

It is only the first partition you can mount, the others are hidden. However raspiwrite.py will format and write a distro image to an SD card. The first time it does this it takes about half an hour, however I have just redone an other SD card it it only took five minuets.
The plan is now to try and recover my files from the other non booting SD card. However, I suspect all the wi-fi configuration that half works ( works on WPA but not WEP ) will have to be done again as I have no idea what files it put where.

Ran Talbott


As a Linux box it is pretty slow and underpowered.

As a desktop PC, it's slow and underpowered.  But there are millions of Linux boxes out there that aren't desktop PCs: routers, WiFi APs, NAS systems, kiosks, industrial automation controllers, set top boxes, and lots of others. At least many hundreds of different products, if not thousands.  The RPi, in theory, is great for many of those (although that's starting to look a little iffy in practice).

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As a teaching tool, well what is it teaching? Linux? (could do that on a PC).

But at what cost? The RPi is cheap enough that many schools in industrialized countries could afford to issue them like textbooks.  The "computer lab" then becomes just a collection of monitors, mice, KBs, and whatever course-specific hardware the school chooses.  Middle- and upper-class kids would be able to take the actual course system home to do homework (poorer kids are less likely to have an HDMI monitor at home. I think this was a gaffe on the RPi designers' part, because a lot of kids, especially in developing countries, who could benefit from having a cheap learning platform, would find it easier to get access to older, non-HDMI monitors).

In that environment, the teacher will be the one who picks and configures the system software.  Which could change from semester to semester.   Or even hour to hour: let's say you're running a school in a poor area that can't afford an RPi per student.  The first-period kids are learning web design. They get an SD card with a Linux server system that you know has Apache x.x, PHP y.y, etc.  The second period kids are learning embedded: they get an SD card with an RTOS, or the Arduino IDE.

This opens the possibility of schools teaching a variety of skills that are completely out of reach now due to hardware costs.   

But, of course, this isn't going to happen unless they get past this phase where each RPi is set up in isolation by its owner.  It's like the very early days of the Model T, when they were being sold into rural areas where there was no infrastructure of paved roads, gas stations, and competing Pep Boys/Kragen/Auto Zone stores supplying parts and accessories.  The early adopters had to self-teach and improvise to get the benefit of the new technology, but the infrastructure developed quickly as cars became a true mass market.

The big problem isn't that the RPi needs new software: what it needs is the volume that will motivate people to package the software that already exists in a newby-friendly form.

AWOL

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The "computer lab" then becomes just a collection of monitors

Brand new monitors, equipped with HDMI.
Hmm, not sure about that one.
"Pete, it's a fool looks for logic in the chambers of the human heart." Ulysses Everett McGill.
Do not send technical questions via personal messaging - they will be ignored.

Grumpy_Mike

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the teacher will be the one who picks and configures the system software.  Which could change from semester to semester.

Do you know anything about education in the UK?
The teachers have no choice in how they teach let alone what they teach. It is all dedicated from above. That is why so many able teachers left the profession in the 90s.

Nick Gammon

Sounds like the BBC PC over again:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Micro

I bought one of those when I was in the UK. Sadly don't have it any more. It was very good.
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

lesto


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The "computer lab" then becomes just a collection of monitors

Brand new monitors, equipped with HDMI.
Hmm, not sure about that one.


you are forgetting the composed video output. A scart adapter like the one used for old PS and you are done with 99% of TV around the world.

Quote

The big problem isn't that the RPi needs new software: what it needs is the volume that will motivate people to package the software that already exists in a newby-friendly form.

many people are forgetting that this is a DEVELOPER sale, in fact it was limited to 1 board for people.
So you shouldn't complain because your OS doesn't work flawless, but instead start to track out the bug.

ps. it is almost 12 hour that my rasp is compiling his own kernel... and just for fun  :smiley-mr-green:
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Nick Gammon


But at what cost? The RPi is cheap enough that many schools in industrialized countries could afford to issue them like textbooks.  The "computer lab" then becomes just a collection of monitors, mice, KBs, and whatever course-specific hardware the school chooses. 


This is a good point. To teach Arduino you need the Arduino and a PC/Mac/Linux box. To teach RPi you just need the Pi and a monitor/TV and keyboard.

Still, is it teaching Unix or microcontrollers? If Unix, you can probably get some cheap second-hand PCs which people throw out when they upgrade to Windows 8 or whatever.

If what I have seen locally is anything to go by, the Education Department will mandate that every school uses Windows, so the question might be a bit academic.
http://www.gammon.com.au/electronics

Grumpy_Mike

#88
Jul 02, 2012, 12:46 am Last Edit: Jul 02, 2012, 09:43 am by Grumpy_Mike Reason: 1
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So you shouldn't complain because your OS doesn't work flawless, but instead start to track out the bug.

But that is not happening, foroum advice is just to load new variants. No one is interested in fixing stuff. The OS is currently total crap.

Edit   -   iPad spell checker going off on one it should have been variants.

lesto

barents? i can't understand your sentence

you should find more help on official forum of the arm OS you're using than in the raps one
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