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Topic: Raspberry Pi launch farce (Read 21 times) previous topic - next topic

Osgeld


you are forgetting the composed video output. A scart adapter like the one used for old PS and you are done with 99% of TV around the world.


obviously one who has not spent much time in 80 column text let alone a graphics environment using standard issue TV's, it took me 3 years of trying random tv's before I found a LCD unit that was readable under those conditions. I would also like to point out that used PC's dont up and vanish either, all of a sudden it seems rather silly getting these boards together, along with adapters, monitors that really dont exist, and fighting with a wonky linux install when one can buy a pallette of pizza box P4's for 5 bucks a pop at habitat for humanity. All while providing something more useful, education on computers and software that the majority of the world uses.

This "education" angle has baffled me since day one, as its utter nonsense.

lesto

i don't get your complain. obviously it is not the same resolution you'll use on a PC, but still usable.
BTW due to mass production, i think cathodic TV are now more expansive than LCD one.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36GvPxbAiv8
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westfw

Quote
is it teaching Unix or microcontrollers?

IIRC, the original intent was to teach "programming", using python (thus the name.)
I've never understood why an old (free) PC wasn't a better choice, either.  Perhaps it has something to do with "expectations."  If you have a PC and it doesn't download video and play flash games, it's essentially 'broken.'  But a business-card sized computer might make people happy even if all it can do is run a python interpreter...

Nick Gammon

You know, looking at the specs for the BBC Micro:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BBC_Micro

(Model A)

RAM: 16 Kb
ROM: 32 Kb
Disk: none
Ports: serial/parallel/user/analog ... all optional extras

You would think you could make something similar these days with an Atmega1284P which has:

RAM: 16 Kb
Flash: 128 Kb
EEPROM: 4 Kb
Ports: 32, including SPI, I2C, serial, ADC, PWM x 6, timers x 4

Throw in a keyboard interface (eg. USB or PS2), and some sort of video output, and you could make something that could be a "PC in a box".
The Flash could have a Basic (or Pascal or similar) interpreter on it.
You could use an SD card to store files.

Osgeld


i don't get your complain. obviously it is not the same resolution you'll use on a PC, but still usable.
BTW due to mass production, i think cathodic TV are now more expansive than LCD one.


yea I cant read that, so its unusable to me, and you forget they have made CRT tv's for half a century now so price is not an issue, its quality

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