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Topic: Calculating amps!! (Read 2 times) previous topic - next topic

kf2qd


Adding 4 batteries and making it 6v should work for 2500mA for 4 hours. So basically it depends on the load.. rite??



Not quite ... You are using the term battery to mean 2 different things.

A single "battery" is properly a CELL. Several cells in series of parallel is a BATTERY. Comes from the idea of artilery. 1 gun is just a gun, a group of guns is a battery.

Cells in series add their voltages so 4 cells in series for 6V is still only 2500mA for 1 hour. 4 cells in parallel would add their current capacity and provide you with 1.5V at 2500mA for 4 hours.

FelixFelicis

Hmm..

kk.. I get it. lets say its not 2.5 Amp for 4 hours, Assume if its around 1 amp for 4 hours..

My questions is..

The current flowing through the circuit, is it a constant 1 Amp, or does it depend on the load in the circuit..
I have a 32mA 6v motor connected to the supply. Should I limit the current flow to 32 mA or is it that the motor itself will draw only 32 mA from the supply??

Please suggest..
Thank you..

FelixFelicis



Adding 4 batteries and making it 6v should work for 2500mA for 4 hours. So basically it depends on the load.. rite??



Not quite ... You are using the term battery to mean 2 different things.

A single "battery" is properly a CELL. Several cells in series of parallel is a BATTERY. Comes from the idea of artilery. 1 gun is just a gun, a group of guns is a battery.

Cells in series add their voltages so 4 cells in series for 6V is still only 2500mA for 1 hour. 4 cells in parallel would add their current capacity and provide you with 1.5V at 2500mA for 4 hours.


May be I should start learning Electronics from the Scratch Again..  :~
Ok..
Reframing it, If I add 4 cells in series I will still get 2.5A for 1 hour, and in parallel for 1.5v I get 2.5 A for 4 hours.. Can I get 10A from the same setup for 1 hour??

Nick Gammon

I suggest you look up the videos by Afrotechmods on YouTube.

He talks about that, amongst other things.

One problem with batteries is that they have an ESR (equivalent series resistance). At high current drains this inbuilt resistance itself lowers the voltage output and makes the battery get hot.

Nick Gammon


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