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Topic: Update on DASH7 (Read 8 times) previous topic - next topic

oric_dan

Looks like an incredibly complex protocol that's gonna take some serious processing
power, so it's not quite clear whether it'll actually be "low-power" to do all that
stuff. It took Maxstream/Digi 2 or 3 years to get the zigbee mesh protocol right.

The main website has a lot of talk about protocols and comparisons with other existing
protocols, but not much at all about actual working hardware. Will have to wait for
some working hardware, before can tell very much.

http://www.dash7.org/

jpnorair

#11
Jan 12, 2013, 01:49 am Last Edit: Jan 12, 2013, 01:51 am by jpnorair Reason: 1

I have no other relationship with panstamp except being a "happy user", but I think it deserves a bigger community. Take a look. The SWAP stack is great, even if its all-HEX approach isn't the most user-readable one... If you can make a side-by-side comparison with DASH7, I'm interested.


OpenTag/DASH7 is designed to be the world's lowest-power RF stack, so many of the differences between DASH7 and SWAP are levels of sophistication needed to give DASH7 lower power.  MCU time is much lower power than RF time is, so to use this tradeoff, DASH7 has sophisticated anti-collision, synchronizing, filtering, and querying mechanisms that are unique.  If you don't care so much about running the device for years on a small battery, or running off a small solar cell, then these differences are less impactful.

The other difference that may be impactful even for non-low-power applications is that DASH7 can support IPv6 addressing, UDPv6, and CoAP.  So, if you want to link it to HTTP or other REST applications, it doesn't require extra pieces.

SWAP seems like a nice system that could compete with things like ZWave.  DASH7 is more sophisticated, so it is often more difficult for hobbyists to use it for adding wireless to a project, but it can scale-up without concern: 10k units, 1M units, 1B units, etc.  That is the tradeoff.

jpnorair


It's still not entirely clear to me whether OpenTag (HayTag, what's the difference?) on an 8bit AVR (not arduino).


HayTag is hardware.  OpenTag is software (firmware).  There is no AVR port for OpenTag because I am busy supporting MSP430 and Cortex M.  It is as simple as that.

The 7stick was supposed to be available now from TI (http://www.indigresso.com/wiki/doku.php?id=opentag:board:ez430-rf5509), but for some reason they have not offered the unit for sale yet.  If it goes much longer, I will build and sell the thing myself using ST parts  ]:)

tochinet

@haarts, if the meshing feature is what you need, and you target home automation, you can take a look at panstamps as well. Very similar to JeeNode, but with better radios (CC1100), and a set of "holder" boards that can even install in a DIN-rail fusebox. Very responsive support. All open source.

I have no other relationship with panstamp except being a "happy user", but I think it deserves a bigger community. Take a look. The SWAP stack is great, even if its all-HEX approach isn't the most user-readable one... If you can make a side-by-side comparison with DASH7, I'm interested.

oliv3r

JP,

It's still not entirely clear to me whether OpenTag (HayTag, what's the difference?) on an 8bit AVR (not arduino). I understand your love for the MSP430. Hey, I was even going to buy one of the chronos watches when they had them up at TIdeals but missed that specifically for Dash7 hobbying! Also never found your 7stick to reach the world :(

Anyhow, you mention you removed the DMA requirement and thus it should run on 8bit-ters. Where can I read about ports etc of that?

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