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Topic: Your languages? (Read 3175 times) previous topic - next topic

bld

I am wondering how many languages people here "speak", I am from Denmark, and normally I speak Danish. I can understand german, but not talk or write it.

Of programming languages I can C#, some C/C++, ASP, a bit PHP and LSL (http://lslwiki.net/lslwiki/wakka.php?wakka=HomePage)

And all self learned, with a lot use of google. :)


What about you? Are English your native language? And what about programming languages? And lastly, how did you learn them?
captain-slow.dk | non contagious!

Groove

#1
May 10, 2010, 04:25 pm Last Edit: May 10, 2010, 04:31 pm by GrooveFlotilla Reason: 1
English (native) French (reasonably fluent - I can hold a conversation about land-reclamation in Aquitaine)), Russian & German (I can order a meal!)

C/C++ (mostly learned on the job), various assemblers (MACRO11, IBM 360, 68K, Intel, PowerPC), and have earned a crust writing in FORTRAN, COBOL, PL/M and occam2.

I think the only languages I was ever formally taught were Algol, COBOL, Lisp and APL.
And BASIC, but the counselling is working, and the flashbacks are much rarer now.
Per Arduino ad Astra

retrolefty

Reminds me of the old joke:

What do you call a person the speaks two languages? .... Bilingual

What do you call a person the speaks three languages? .... Trilingual

What do you call a person the speaks only one language ... American

Lefty

cr0sh

Quote
What do you call a person the speaks only one language ... American


That would definitely be me; I can muddle through reading some French and Spanish - very little though, and only what I can barely remember from my high school days.

:)

As far as computer languages are concerned? I've played with way too many to list over the years; BASIC was my first language (and one that I still have a soft spot for - I've used and played with tons of different versions over the years - my favorite was AMOS on the Amiga), I've also messed with LOGO (small Radio Shack class I took as a kid, I also created an interpretor for it in BASIC while in High School for the Apple IIe), Fortran (mainly from learning to translate code from it to BASIC), C/C++ (various), Pascal, DBC/COBOL, PICK (an integrated DB environment which used a variant of BASIC), Assembler (80x86, 68000, 6809, 6502). Most of my more recent work (PC based) has been with PHP, Perl, and Python; I have been looking at FreeBASIC and Gambas (told you I had a soft spot!) lately, though.

What I have learned doing all of this is not to focus on the "language", and instead focus on the process and how it all fits together; most computer languages at the base level today have the same control structures and similar syntax - by not focusing on the "language of the month", I have found that my skills easily transfer environments (and as a result, I am more marketable as an employee).
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

andylama

Native English speaker (California dialect), some German, and a few words and phrases in Korean and Spanish

Computer languages:  BASIC, C, Pascal, Assembly, and a few obscure application-specific scripting languages you've never heard of.
I make it all up as I go along.

jabber

As an Englishman I cringe slightly when a non native English speaker apologizes for their poor understanding of the English language, as though it is a failing on their part that they are not fully fluent.
I did go to a year long night school class to learn to speak German 35 years ago, but I have only ever spoken it a few times and now most of it is forgotten.
Apart from that, very bad Pascal & C & the remains of about 5 proprietry database programming languages from the 1980's    

cr0sh

Quote
As an Englishman I cringe slightly when a non native English speaker apologizes for their poor understanding of the English language, as though it is a failing on their part that they are not fully fluent.


THIS.

On one level, I am envious, and on another level, I can't imagine doing this - being a non-native speaker, then going into a technical forum and attempting to ask a question (then interpret the answers) in a non-native tounge.

Props to those brave souls who do it (and aren't attempting to sell me something!).

Hopefully, though, English as the "lingua franca" of the world won't be changing any time soon. I wonder how people felt during the transistion from Latin to English? It would seem to be something very alienating to an certain extent...

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

doublet

I'm from Belgium, so I speak Dutch, but I can speak English really fluent. I also can speak French, but I don't like that lang. I have to learn it at school :). Since when I was 10 (I'm 14 now), I started learning HTML, JS, CSS, and so on. Now, I'm focusing on PHP and Arduino C. I'm also wanting to learn some programming languages, any suggestions ^^?
Sorry God members, I'm an atheist.

cr0sh

Quote
I'm also wanting to learn some programming languages, any suggestions ^^?


Yes.

Focus on processes rather than the language(s) used to implement them.

If you can take a problem, break it up into its constituent sub-problems, then describe the solutions to those sub-problems as processes, plus how they interact with themselves, other sub-processes, plus the system as a whole - in a consistent, rational, and workable manner - you will have a skill that few other mere "programmers" posess.

Having this skill (and being able to apply it to a wide range of situations, from hardware to software, to anything involving a process - which is just about -everything-), coupled with skills in hardware design and software development...

Let's just say you won't lack for employment in the forseeable future.

:)

BTW - I am aware of your age as you stated it, so the above is a little forward thinking, but not by that many years; you're 14 now, so take this time where you don't have to worry about bills, a mortgage, whether your car is going to break down, what about my wife/husband/significant other/etc, etc, etc - and use it -wisely- to prepare for your future. I am 36-going-on-37 now; I think about when I was 14 and wish I could have applied myself better. I also know that likely, had my future self said this to my younger self, it probably would've gone in one ear and out the other, as the old saying goes. Still, I am saying it to you in the hopes that something of it might sink in. You have this chance only once in your life (if you are lucky - as I well know there are plenty who don't even have that chance), use it wisely...

Good luck.

:)
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

Coding Badly

#9
May 10, 2010, 08:59 pm Last Edit: May 10, 2010, 09:00 pm by bcook Reason: 1

Shortly after moving to Texas, my wife and I went into a grocery store to buy Mountain Dew.  I spotted a lady stocking a freezer and decided to ask for help.  As I approached I said, "Excuse me, ma'am.  Where do you keep the pop?"  She slowly turned to me.  In a loud shrill voice she proclaimed, "Ya'll aren't from around here, are ya?  Ya'll sound like a bunch of damn'd yankees!  The cokes is over there."   :o

According to one person in Houston I speak "Yankee".

I'm as multilingual as Homer Simpson...  "Le Grille!  What the hell is that?"  ...with one exception: I can understand a bit of Texan.

As far as progamming languages, the list is embarassingly long.  I'll just say C++ and ObjectPascal (aka Delphi).  I learned C in college and ObjectPascal for work.

bld

Quote
Shortly after moving to Texas, my wife and I went into a grocery store to buy Mountain Dew.  I spotted a lady stocking a freezer and decided to ask for help.  As I approached I said, "Excuse me, ma'am.  Where do you keep the pop?"  She slowly turned to me.  In a loud shrill voice she proclaimed, "Ya'll aren't from around here, are ya?  Ya'll sound like a bunch of darn'd yankees!  The cokes is over there."


Got exactly the same here, just with candy instead. And so fun to see if you go into a store and ask for it, they all go. :-?

And then on the way out when you say goodbye we got another word, meaning hello, see you, goodbye, and so on... And if you turn around, they again stand there with the :-? expression. ;D
captain-slow.dk | non contagious!

Ran Talbott

On the "people language" side,  I learned Latin growing up Catholic (altar boy, and a brief time in seminary. Until puberty kicked in, and changed my mind about that career path  ::) ).  In the 70s,  I lived in Toronto, and learned French from listening to the CBC and Quebec rockers (although there are those who would argue that what I learned wasn't really "French"  ;)).  In the 1980s I hosted a Japanese exchange student one summer,  so I learned a bit of that.  In the 1990s I worked for a company that had a partnership with Siemens,  so I picked up a smattering of Italian from reading their documentation and working with the engineers they sent over.  And,  living an CA and AZ for most of my life,  I've acquired a bit of Spanish (though nowhere near as much as I'd like).  But I've never really been fluent in anything but English.

I started in mainframe DP in the 1970s,  so all my formal instruction was in FORTRAN,  COBOL,  RPG,  and a couple of different assembly languages.  Over the years,  I've self-taught a bunch of others as needed for jobs,  or to satisfy my curiosity:  PL/I,  APL,  SNOBOL,  C,  FORTH,  BASIC,  Perl,  Awk,  PHP,  and assembler for an assortment of CPUs.

westfw

Native English speaker.  Some German; enough to not starve, but I think science or engineering would be out of the question.  It wasn't in the class.  (actually, my last year of German, we read a mystery novel.  That didn't work very well either :-( )

Computer languages: I've been graded or paid for BASIC (several varieties), Fortran, PL/1, Pascal, Assorted Assemblers, Postscript, TECO, and C.  I looked at ALGOL and COBOL quite briefly (neither did what I was looking for at the time.  And APL.  Actually Algol would have, but I coudn't see it from the manual.)  I wrote a simulation in  MACSYMA.  I audited part of a Smalltalk class, back in the Sun-1 days.  I've done work on BLISS, MacLisp, elisp, C++, and Java apps without really knowing the languages (including Arduino sketches and the IDE!)  I followed Forth with some interest for a while, but never actually wrote much.  Some of several scripting languages (BAT, MIC, PCL, csh, bash, tcl.)  I've worked on JCL and Makefiles.

After a while, they all start to look alike in a lot of ways.  And even if they aren't so much alike, you can make them LOOK alike anyway (not such a good thing, actually.)

Recently I've been experimenting with PERL...

CowJam

Not many at all... English, and I get by in php/mysql though I'm not fluent.  I was very good with Pascal last century but haven't really programmed since I dropped out of uni in 2002. Well, until I got my arduino a couple of weeks ago.

I think finishing school to discover virtually nobody actually used pascal, and certainly not the DOS based version I was used to, put me off a bit.

CowJam

Doublet:
Quote
I'm also wanting to learn some programming languages, any suggestions ^^?


I think most universities predominantly use Java (or at least start with it).  It depends what you want to do, really.
Some languages are great for teaching, like pascal, as they have a very rigid format so you get used to good style.

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