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Topic: Easy Driver stepper motor driver (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

hungerburg

Sparkfun electronics sells a stepper motor driver with only two inputs: to me that looks like a very comfortable part, as all the complexity is in software ;) please see "http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8368" and http://greta.dhs.org/EasyDriver/ for details.

Now I dont know at all, how to hook that up to an arduino:
- does the arduino have to supply the power?
- otherwise, how would both have a common ground?
- which arduino ports to wire to the easy driver STEP/DIR pins (digital out)?

Thank you.

Peter

Hoeken

Quote
Sparkfun electronics sells a stepper motor driver with only two inputs: to me that looks like a very comfortable part, as all the complexity is in software ;) please see "http://www.sparkfun.com/commerce/product_info.php?products_id=8368" and http://greta.dhs.org/EasyDriver/ for details.

Now I dont know at all, how to hook that up to an arduino:
- does the arduino have to supply the power?
- otherwise, how would both have a common ground?
- which arduino ports to wire to the easy driver STEP/DIR pins (digital out)?

Thank you.

Peter


that looks like an awesome board, and i was planning on building one just like it!  I guess now I'm going to have to check it out.  I cant answer all your questions, but I can answer some of them.

you wire the step/dir pins to the digital out pins.  it *doesnt* need PWM, so i would recommend using a plain pin, and save your PWM pins for something you might want to use PWM on.

i'd also like to know the answers to the first two questions, as i'm dealing with the same question right now.

Hoeken

oh, also... just to clarify:  the step and direction inputs each need their own pin.

hungerburg

#3
Sep 29, 2007, 03:06 am Last Edit: Sep 29, 2007, 03:35 am by hungerburg Reason: 1
The designer of the Easy Driver wrote to tell me, that his board only needs the power for the motor (12-30V), but both the driver and the controller need the same ground level. Its a tough exam - who will find out first how to get at it? I imagine that plugging both transformers into the same mains socket will not work.

Hoeken

i was basically asking the same question in this thread:  http://www.arduino.cc/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1190986476

which is essentially that for higher power circuits with an external supply voltage, what do you do with the grounds?  i'm not 100% sure yet, but it seems you want to connect the grounds from the two supplies together.  i'm going to be breadboarding the circuit i designed this weekend, so i'll report back with my results when i have some real experience with it.

good luck!

hungerburg

I was told that its common and OK to just connect the grounds of two DC-adapters; even if they provide a different current. Using a single PC power supply is a nice idea, as parts and connectors are robust and essentially free:)

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