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Topic: Making a servo idle (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

shapingstuff

Hi,

This is a general question about servo's - I hope no one minds me asking it here!

Is there a way to make the servo idle in a particular position?

If I move it to a position and then set the pulse to 0 or off it is slow to respond when I then send it a pwm position.  It's really to stop it drawing current and making a noise while holding it's position.

Do servo's have a specific PWM for idle?  If so I can't find any info on data sheets.

Thanks in advance for any info.

AWOL

You can detach a servo, in which case the library stops pulsing it, but then it will lose any position-holding, so if it is loaded, it will move away from the position you last sent it.
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DuaneB

Hi,
   The servo is not really holding its position if you are not pulsing it, it will seem as if it is because of the mechanical resistance of the gear train inside it, but once the load is sufficient to overcome this resistance, it will move and keep on moving.

If your load is light, this should not be a problem

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com

retrolefty


Hi,

This is a general question about servo's - I hope no one minds me asking it here!

Is there a way to make the servo idle in a particular position?

If I move it to a position and then set the pulse to 0 or off it is slow to respond when I then send it a pwm position.  It's really to stop it drawing current and making a noise while holding it's position.

Do servo's have a specific PWM for idle?  If so I can't find any info on data sheets.

Thanks in advance for any info.


If it is a standard R/C type servo, (not one modified for continous rotation), you do not need to do anything to make it hold the last position, the servo library will contiously keep sending that last position value you commanded to the servo. There is no reason to 'detach' the servo, in fact the detach command is more often used in error then for any valid reason.

Lefty

PaulS

Quote
There is no reason to 'detach' the servo, in fact the detach command is more often used in error then for any valid reason.

But, OP says that they are noisy when holding still (hard to believe) and consume current (easy to believe). So detaching and powering off would address both of those issues.

But, only if the servo is actually powered off, which detaching does not do. The power to the servo would need to go through a transistor that the Arduino turned on and off, in addition to detaching the servo.

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