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Topic: Dust Collection System for Fab Lab? (Read 496 times) previous topic - next topic

thinktankgroup

Hi there!

We are opening a one-of-a-kind Fab Lab, and are looking for recommendations / advice on the best dust collection systems for the type of work that we will be doing in our shop.

BACKGROUND

- We have several different zones in our shop, including Robotics, Wood Shop, Metal Shop, CNC Shop, Chemical Storage, Paint Booth, etc.
- We will be zoning off our "dusty" work zones from our "non-dusty" zones, such as our office space, material storage, etc.
- See photo to get a better overview of our space: https://www.screencast.com/t/Bn0IPbuEL (Yellow = dust zone, Blue = no dust zone.)

QUESTIONS
- What is the best dust collection system for this kind of fab lab?
- What are you using / would you recommend for dust collection? Air purification? Fume extraction?

I would really appreciate any insights, recommendations or advice that you could share! Thanks in advance.

pert

I'm using one of these dust collectors:
http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/
It was designed for woodworking but I actually use it on my sandblaster. Bill Pentz has published detailed instructions for making your own or you can purchase them pre-made from Clear-Vue.

For fume extraction/ventilation I use the Fantech FKD XL mixed flow inline fans. They have a good flow rate for the size and handle the higher static pressures caused by complex ducting runs or filters. In over a decade of daily use I haven't had one fail.

For particulate air filtration I use the filters recommended by Bill Pentz, both on my dust collector outlet and a separate recirculating filter in my house.

If you want a quality activated carbon filter check out the ones they sell in hydroponics gardening stores for odor control. I think that will be the lowest price you will find on that sort of filter. They are available in a range of sizes. If you live in an area where there are a lot of indoor growers you may be able to find used ones for free or cheap. You can buy replacement carbon. You may be able to renew the used activated carbon. There is a place in my local area that does this. Here's a Hackaday article about someone using one of these to filter their laser cutter exhaust:
https://hackaday.com/2017/06/20/kill-the-exhaust-not-your-lungs-with-the-fume-coffin/

thinktankgroup

I'm using one of these dust collectors:
http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/
It was designed for woodworking but I actually use it on my sandblaster. Bill Pentz has published detailed instructions for making your own or you can purchase them pre-made from Clear-Vue.

For fume extraction/ventilation I use the Fantech FKD XL mixed flow inline fans. They have a good flow rate for the size and handle the higher static pressures caused by complex ducting runs or filters. In over a decade of daily use I haven't had one fail.

For particulate air filtration I use the filters recommended by Bill Pentz, both on my dust collector outlet and a separate recirculating filter in my house.

If you want a quality activated carbon filter check out the ones they sell in hydroponics gardening stores for odor control. I think that will be the lowest price you will find on that sort of filter. They are available in a range of sizes. If you live in an area where there are a lot of indoor growers you may be able to find used ones for free or cheap. You can buy replacement carbon. You may be able to renew the used activated carbon. There is a place in my local area that does this. Here's a Hackaday article about someone using one of these to filter their laser cutter exhaust:
https://hackaday.com/2017/06/20/kill-the-exhaust-not-your-lungs-with-the-fume-coffin/
pert, thanks so much for the great response. I appreciate you sharing your insights with me, and these links. I'm going to check them out right now. Thanks a ton!

ballscrewbob

I have to agree with Pert as the cyclones are awesome as a separation device having used them in various industrial applications and for other small scale projects.

They are also especially good at liquid to solid separation too allowing such as metal fines from wet process to be separated and give longer coolant life spans.

Often found that a filter is not needed depending on the air / liquid velocity and throughputs.
But with such as a wood shop it could be very beneficial.

For welding fumes its a totally different matter and cyclones wont give you too much benefit except on the pre filter final output from all your welding booths.
Thats aspect of filtering atmosphere requires a more specialised approach.

Basic Cyclones

There are specialised considerations and calculations to take into account even without cyclone technology but its usually something along the lines of having that same or more make up air available for the total cubic footage / M at full capacity so if you had 100 cubic feet of space in welding you would need that plus an extra  percentage of freely available make up air but not coming from any where near the output source. Also taking into account local conditions. EG you wouldnt want air coming in at minus 40 in Alaska to a workplace that was being heated and vice versa.

Zoning of the dust / fume types is a very good idea, glad you are looking at that side.
It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

ballscrewbob

#4
Aug 09, 2017, 06:40 am Last Edit: Aug 09, 2017, 06:41 am by ballscrewbob
BTW I have almost collapsed a 45 gallon steel drum with the smallest "dust deputy" and a 10 HP/30 liter vac. and 2" lines

We ran the sticky tape tests for analysis and achieved closer to 98% separation in a room 500 cubic sq foot.
The existing sep was only getting around 30% with filters only.
Cant remember the CFM but it was pretty crazy and we all jumped out of our skins when the drum buckled.
It may not be the answer you were looking for but its the one I am giving based on either experience, educated guess, google or the fact that you gave nothing to go with in the first place so I used my wonky crystal ball.

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