Arduino Forum

Using Arduino => Project Guidance => Topic started by: digarduino on Apr 18, 2014, 01:51 pm

Title: Maximum that arduino can handle.
Post by: digarduino on Apr 18, 2014, 01:51 pm
Hello All,

I was doing a project where I would need to control and monitor the following elements. I would need your input to know if this is too much to expect from an arduino / or if it can operate with stability or not.

A) Monitor tank levels , temperature and ph for 6 tanks.
B) Function as a tank level controller( relay driven motor) for another tank
C) Function as a timer based pump controller for another tank.
D) Monitor and display atmospheric temperature and humidity.

Can I single arduino perform all these with good stability?

Thanks in advance. 
Title: Re: Maximum that arduino can handle.
Post by: wildbill on Apr 18, 2014, 02:20 pm
An arduino can do all that with ease. Depending on the specifics of your sensors and pumps you may have a lot of I/O lines to control, possibly more than a standalone Uno could manage. You could address this with shift registers or a larger arduino such as a Mega.
Title: Re: Maximum that arduino can handle.
Post by: digarduino on Apr 18, 2014, 02:32 pm
Thank you wildbill. Appreciate your time.
Title: Re: Maximum that arduino can handle.
Post by: polyglot on Apr 18, 2014, 03:09 pm
No problem, even with an old Duemilanove.  An Uno is fine.  Try googling for "I2C IO expander", there are lots of options if you decide you need more pins.
Title: Re: Maximum that arduino can handle.
Post by: mirith on Apr 18, 2014, 03:17 pm
Also, its possible you can get digital I2C sensors for a lot of these devices for stuff like the Temperature and pH (And maybe Level, I don't know how you intend to do level).  These only require 2 wires for all of them, but you will need them to be addressable up to at least 8 devices.  Another question is how quickly do things need to react?  If you are talking about cycling through measurements every 100+ms, then you are fine, but if you need it to react fast to something, then the arduino is not a good fit, since most likely you will be unable to perform 'real-time' adjustments.  That being said, you are working in liquid tanks, which tend to take seconds to react to any disturbance at all.