Arduino Forum

Using Arduino => General Electronics => Topic started by: vikramnayak on Jan 09, 2019, 01:02 pm

Title: Lithium ION charging
Post by: vikramnayak on Jan 09, 2019, 01:02 pm
Hey guys,
I've been trying to charge a single lithium ION cell using a DC-DC converter. I'm using a Buck level converter with both current and voltage control. If I'm not wrong, the O/P voltage reaches a set level till a current limit is reached (unless current is set to max?).

I've connected an 18650 battery to it's output, set the voltage to 4.1V and kept the current to max (I've set the current POT to half way as well, but same result). Using an ammeter I see that the current does not exceed 1A (1.22) no matter what. Even at full current setting, the voltage is raised at the output only till current caps at 1.22A. Any specific reason why the DC-DC converter isn't exceeding that current. The converter is rated at 12A 300W. No clue why this is happening

Here's the DC converter: DC DC Converter 12A 300W (https://www.amazon.in/dp/B0769Y69LX/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_BhEnCbP4KMEN9)
Title: Re: Lithium ION charging
Post by: Idahowalker on Jan 09, 2019, 03:05 pm
Post the Arduino code and the Arduino error messages you are getting. Also, post pictures of how you wired the device to the Arduino.
Title: Re: Lithium ION charging
Post by: srnet on Jan 09, 2019, 04:16 pm
What is the maximum rated charge current for the battery you are charging ?
Title: Re: Lithium ION charging
Post by: raschemmel on Jan 09, 2019, 04:45 pm
Maybe you should read this (https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/charging_lithium_ion_batteries)

Quote
Using an ammeter I see that the current does not exceed 1A (1.22) no matter what
Hmm, that's funny. Isn't that the current in the graph shown at the above link ?



Quote
The advised charge rate of an Energy Cell is between 0.5C and 1C; the complete charge time is about 2-3 hours. Manufacturers of these cells recommend charging at 0.8C or less to prolong battery life; however, most Power Cells can take a higher charge C-rate with little stress
I assume you know what "1C" means ?