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Topics => Science and Measurement => Topic started by: ephitran on Jul 18, 2020, 08:23 am

Title: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 18, 2020, 08:23 am
Making mosquitoes stay away from your yard.

For the benefit of new visitors 

Pseudo table of contents:


Theory videos, pictures, are available at:.Please review and critic (http://t.researchsquare.com/track/click/31114617/doi.org?p=eyJzIjoiUlJ4TVE3ZHRqeVRYTWVFd1llWkQ1ZE0wR1FJIiwidiI6MSwicCI6IntcInVcIjozMTExNDYxNyxcInZcIjoxLFwidXJsXCI6XCJodHRwczpcXFwvXFxcL2RvaS5vcmdcXFwvMTAuMjEyMDNcXFwvcnMuMy5ycy00MTAxMFxcXC92MVwiLFwiaWRcIjpcImU1MGZiZWVhY2RiZjRlMmM5NDhjN2FhMzc5NjVlODhjXCIsXCJ1cmxfaWRzXCI6W1wiNjZhOTM0ZWM5MDU0MThiNDQwODkxYWQzOWFhOTk3Y2I5NGJmMzc5NVwiXX0ifQ) Next post will be the mosquito trap that will clear the room in 3 hours.

Intellectual property: Public domain.

Material:
6 5050 RGB LED.
6 220 Ohm resisors.
1 Aurdino as module since the system only use 2 output.

Schematic: The attached file draws 1 RGB LED, you will use  6 in parallel.

Layout Configurations: Please see the second attached file:They are the insides and the finals that we distributed for humanitarian purpose.

Sketch:
Code: [Select]

#define RED_LED 4
#define BLUE_LED 5
// Per schematic the LEDs pins, set low to turn ON.
#define RED_ON digitalWrite(RED_LED,false)
#define RED_OFF digitalWrite(RED_LED,true)
#define BLUE_ON digitalWrite(BLUE_LED,false)
#define BLUE_OFF digitalWrite(BLUE_LED,true)

void setup() {
pinMode(RED_LED, OUTPUT);
RED_OFF;
pinMode(BLUE_LED, OUTPUT);
BLUE_OFF;
}
void loop() {
// optional testing procedures
while(1){
RED_ON;
delayMicroseconds(500);
RED_OFF;
delayMicroseconds(500);
BLUE_ON;
delayMicroseconds(500);
BLUE_OFF;
delayMicroseconds(500);
}
}



Usage: They are not intuitive, and difficult to use. Please follow the instruction carefully.

The keyword is 'shadow' and 'line of sight'.  shadow is the place mosquitoes can hide out of line of sight and become a highway for them to into the object in the middle. Our observation show mosquitoes don't go further more than 3 feet under 'line of sight' area to get into the object.

The unit is ineffective within 2' right up front of the LED.  Please don't test by put them next or near you.  It doesn't work that way.

It works day and night.

For single unit: Imagine that the unit has 90 degree shining angle, It must be place up high, to generously cover all around the footprint of the shadows of the subjects (at least 3' buffer). Then you are safe. - Don't worry about the effective radius which is very far 100's (only if the above conditions met.)

For multiple units: We have use 4 unit at 4 corners for a 100 boy scout group. As long as shadow of one  is cover by the other.


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=373671;image)
 (https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=373671;image)


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=373673;image)
 (https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=373673;image)
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 18, 2020, 08:50 am
I am doing this for the benefit of the community. I will go extra and extra to help you regardless of your purpose with only 1 condition: They must be public, available to all.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 18, 2020, 05:39 pm
To save you some times:

If you ever think of "set and forget" modules for your sites using solar power supply.
These are what we are using over the years.

1- 3W, 6V solar panel.
1- Phone charger power bank: USB input/output. Those with 3.8V 18650 battery.
1- Your light module. (We use cheap Holtek CPU)

Connections:

Output of the solar panel -> power bank input.
The light module draw the power from the power bank.

Result: It should have enough power to operate day & night. Plus some extra for cloudy days.

Warning: There is wild-west state on the rate of the solar panel and the battery. Here are some rules of thumb.

- The solar panel should have at least 150 cm x cm.

- After money and medication, Lithium-ion battery stands as the the third most counterfeited; high claims, low quality even you buy from the links in Walmart and Amazon. Some Chinese manufactures even have separate 'versions' for evaluation and for purchased shipping. Brand name battery may last you for several years.

Happy mosquito free.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: Coding Badly on Jul 18, 2020, 10:14 pm

Your link is broken.

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 18, 2020, 10:26 pm
Please try again. I just tested.
I had the same 'broken" sometimes.
Thanks
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 18, 2020, 10:55 pm
Or

I like to pay respect to the Research Square. - The pre-print host of the paper.

Please only use these links if you have problem with the link above. (It's in the google drive)

Paper Body (https://drive.google.com/file/d/1N-w_b6xferL1hrw7ji56S-xRRU3IxHLT/view?usp=sharing)

Supplemental file (https://drive.google.com/file/d/1STNMA9awzhp1h4tq9gEeQdt1Xf7D28I-/view?usp=sharing)
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: Coding Badly on Jul 18, 2020, 11:09 pm
Please try again. I just tested.
Ugh.  I'll do it.

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 20, 2020, 02:56 am
I received a question asking about the use of 3 mm and 5 mm through-hole RGB LED.

It works. However our observations indicated a smaller effective angle. SMT LED claim of 120 degree viewing angle, for the purpose it's around 90. Through-hole? about 60. but, ...  with  through-hole we can bend to beam individual LED making them to support wider angle.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, a simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 22, 2020, 07:30 pm
I like to use the threat to gradually transfer the knowledge accumulated over the years or perhaps decades to save you sometimes by not repeating our same past failures. Some may just an opinion on observations.

It's not programming issues I hope the moderator of the forum OK with it.

The first 'lesson'.

The devices use at least 2 colors, it's is not a specific 'color' that repels insects, but the environment.

- Yellow LED (warm white 3500 cctk) : It's ineffective sometimes during the day.
- Light blue (Cool white 8500 cctk) : It's ineffective about 1/2 hour at around dusk.

My best guess: It is the environment that nullify the flashing property of the devices. Daylight nullify yellow, dusk when the environment change from yellow to blue, at some point it's light blue ?.

If you are OK with it. (As we currently have)  They  are  devices serving dual purposes: Repelling and illumination; a light bulb that repel mosquitoes by using warm white and cool white LED. By utilizing the block voltage (0.7 per simple diode) and forward voltage of the LEDs  you may be able to use 60 Hz AC directly to drive back to back series of cool and warm white LED,  using the combined block voltage as a mean to control the timing.

Unfortunately most people in the world have 50 Hz AC. We have thousands shipped for humanitarian purpose, they promised anything to get ones without intention to keep, some even express their suspicions of the imaginary motives. Although our tests show the 50 HZ worked, but users' opinions, their feedback  that's counted.

Beside the above limitations, these forms they like the most.

We discarded thousands of flat COB to use Corn for better repelling quality - Please see attached picture
.
(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=374381)

Upon available times, my next posts will be:

- Live mosquito traps. In early days, the backyard provided enough samples for us to experiment.

- Simple protocol for us, (and you?) to tell if a programming logic or method repel or not.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 24, 2020, 09:02 pm
Based on feedback from users i think I need to revisit the  issue of using them, again and possible again(s).

- No matter how hard you try to 'teach' them how to use they just hear for the time. Go home they do their own way, They think it is the light that repels mosquitoes.

- Human nature we think of ourselves first, common 'mistake' is to have the device right next to them. Actually  they are sending invitations for them to come. Again it needs a 3' buffer.


NO--NO--NO.
The light doesn't repel mosquitoes. They just  want to get away from 'that' blinking thing; the LED,  even the case of the above dual purpose devices. For them, the lights only occupy a tiny part of their view, the rest are 'safe'. We need to outsmart them by preventing to come in the first place, not to chase them away which the device can not do.

It shines a room meaning enables us to 'see' thing, does not mean mosquitoes scare of the entire room, but only its front part.



Happy mosquito Free!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 24, 2020, 09:20 pm
Something you smile at.

- From my neighbor: Eventually the devices repel geckos  from his backyard- Their foods go away.

- From my wife's co-worker. His dog quits barking at night.

However.

- From my children's tennis coach: His dog barks whenever she ventures in and out the area. My explanation: When you repel mosquitoes from the front, where do they go? To the back of the light, mostly they are ambushing at around the border.

- The children from Africa: The bats don't come when they playing outside and at night .
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 25, 2020, 04:50 am
Schematic and specification for the dual purpose device. The light bulb that repels mosquitoes.


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=374763)


(If the image does not show then see the attached.)
Note:

* LED are with 5730 COB  footprint either 3.1V or 6.2V
* For 3.1V,  its 'block voltage" is normally at 1.45 V means minimum voltage for the current to pass.
* The AC could be either 60 Hz and 50 Hz.
* The resistor could be 500, or 1k for protection against surge.
* There is no capacitor in the circuit.  With capacitors the system may produce more stable light, somehow it's not serving the purpose.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 25, 2020, 03:18 pm
The light bulb that repels mosquitoes.

How did we measure the timing of the above system.
[

A variable transformer comes into handy.

The system should b start to lo light at about 1/2 of the RMS

For example for 110 V light bulb at 60 Hz.

In millisecond.

1 cycle is 1000 /60  and 1 quadrant = 1000/(60*4) = 4.17 and the system start  fully lit at 55 V then the light bulb has the following timings:

ABC:
   Yellow ON;     Delay 4.17;
   Yellow OFF:   Delay 4.17;
   Blue ON;       Delay 4.17;
   Blue OFF;      Delay 4.17;
goto ABC;

How to see if the light bulb indeed splits the lighting.

Have you phone camera ON to near the light bulb.

If it indeed splits the lighting (not mixing) then you will see on your phone bands of yellow, black, blue, black .... So on.  such as:

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=374809)

You can experiment yourselves on normal light bulb

Happy Mosquito Free
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 26, 2020, 08:48 am
I forgot an important feature of the mosquito repelling light bulb.

For outdoor: Year round there aren't insects hovering around the light.

Except: About 4 summer days, there are large number of beetle like died underneath, in a farm it could fill up a cereal bowl.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, a simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Jul 30, 2020, 07:01 am
Mosquito trap  made simple.

The following is the picture of the trap used in my lab.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=375459)

Let's look at the picture first.

Beside the housing from the front the components are.

- A programmed flashing LED (Red, blue 500 Hz)
- Its back has a blue LED.

- A white solid square plate:
   a- To block the insects from seeing the blade of the fan.
   b- To reflect the blue. Blue is selected for its capability to nullify the blue flashing property of the foreground LED.
   c- Its position and size is set to make sure mosquito 'seeing' before they are exposed to the light.
- Window screen.
- Fan. (80x80, 12V 0.35A  component fan)

     The picture show one foreground LED. Unless you have good reason, it should have have two or more. In early indoor/outdoor trials we used 6 and they were fine.
It may not worth the tedious job to use 1-LED configuration, it needs a small piece of fine mesh afflicted right on the surface of the LED. as illustrated in the below picture.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=375461)


How does the trap work?

     Normally traps involve setting attracting agents to draw the animal in order to catch or to kill. This breed of trap utilizes the repelling feature of the technology, upon entering the lit area mosquitoes will go to one of the nearest safe places, it could be a a shadow, or the back of the light which is the largest safe area. In their persisting efforts to get away they venture in in order to meet the light, to retreat until they come near to the place that appears to be safer, they are trapped. Normal traps work to lure the animal to come to it mostly from it front, while this breed traps them during their escaping effort mostly from its back.  - Please see the comment at the ends.


     The technology repels mosquitoes by simulations of the persistent present of other objects that also attract other  predatory insects who thought the lights are their food sources: Beetles, crane flies and unknowns.

The state of the development.

This is not public but in-house 'products', they are only available to family, friends and dozens testers who asked to keep for their personal use.

Usage:

- For indoor application:
   
   If you want to clear the room in the first place, a small disk of water is put about 2' (50cm) in front of the trap. Otherwise it's not necessary.

   There ares some precautions and hints:

          (a) It take sometimes for the trapped to get killed thus they will come out as soon as the power cut.
          (b) Beside it need to be cleaned here and there it is maintenance free.
          (c) The trap works best when it's in front of the walls that narrowing their safe territory.
          (d) The trap is also a mosquito repelling device.
          (e) There were suggested improvements of something such as vanes to prevent mosquitoes getting out due to power off, and mechanism to disassemble for cleaning purposes.

- For outdoor applications;

   The main difference of indoor vs outdoor application are add-on efforts to serve little or no harm to beneficial insects The device requires 1/4 ich mesh to filter large predatory insects.

   However there are strictly nocturnal Texan insects (we don't know the name), they come in number to feast on net trapped mosquitoes. Therefore, for live sample purpose, the net should be replaced by a fairly large chamber to give your mosquito means to avoid eaten. They have the size of a large fire ant, have wings but they are able to craw in and out as of a roach.

   In normal operation the trap will get the  most of the first 1,2 nights; and only few on the subsequent, perhaps the place get cleared out?

NOTE:
The trapping method were not the original purpose of the experiments but to measure the effectiveness of the light in front of the various backgrounds.
Many questions were arisen on the validity of the explanations. Sometimes they are just educated best reasons, inspiration? or from observation over the years. These are the settings that were developed  after the facts.

Equipment for observation and testing purpose.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=375463)


With  the above chamber it allow developer to observe and testing with small sample, from as low as 1/2 dozen.
 
With a trap inside the chamber.

- The trap indeed caught 100% or close in an hour or two.
- The mosquitoes were caught on their way from the back of the trap to the front(observations).
- In the same chamber we use either CO2 or moisture as attracting stimulant. Moisture sources gave us better results; they came looking for food?.

We hope the posts give you some information to start with. The world and consumers always want the better. And collectively The community can do it.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 01, 2020, 09:51 pm
For immediate needs.

Or

if you want a quick experience with the technology.


In the above post we discus the dual purpose devices, the light bulbs that repel mosquitoes. Actually in early days we had 1 cool white light bulb and 1 warm white light bulb put next to each other as a set.

I am not going into details how to do but in general for only 'engineers' who know what they are doing and keep me out of any liability if accidents happened. We are dealing with live AC that can kill.

In general you can modify 2 light bulbs, 1 cool white and 1 warm white. They alternately response to the directions of the AC.

-- Normally there are 2 schemes to reduce the voltage for its power supply. The brand names are normal use transformer and the cheap one use capacitors.

-- In either case it has a diode bridge rectifier.

-- It is obligatory that the light bulbs can be open to be modified:

------For transformer style power supply all you need to do is to modify the full wave rectifier to have it becomes haft wave rectifier, one for forward current and the other for the reverse. It i important that all the capacitors removed. Although it has the protective resistor it does not hurt if you add some more 1/2 W 500 ohm???

----- For the capacitors scheme power supply. This is a little tricky. You do the same as the above. Plus you need to add a high power rated high value resistor. (1/2 W 2K ohm ?-- its hot---) You need some way to dissipate the heat too.

Usage:

Put it up very high, up high or at least 2  in the backyard.

You will know where it works where it doesn't to aim the devices accordingly.

    So you and your friends can enjoy cool beers in the afternoon or for the ladies to enjoy sunbath.

Good luck!
and
happy mosquitoes free!



Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ballscrewbob on Aug 02, 2020, 05:04 am
I love this topic !

I dont want the TRAP though...

But in all honesty could I use a strip of programmable led's and select a specific colour bandwidth from that ?
Oh and do you have anything for blackflies (Nothern Canada) which are evil little baskets of fun.

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 02, 2020, 05:58 am
But in all honesty could I use a strip of programmable led's and select a specific colour bandwidth from that ?

With your question i assume that you are one of the techies classes.
Yes.

We have done that a while back.

For frequency you can choose anywhere form 60 HZ to 500 HZ - in the lab 500 is the best however we have noway to tell the difference in life tests. We are very confident that the frequency range can be lower to 50 HZ but the people who promised me feedback (from other country just) just . . . forgot. One think we know for sure that if the any 'quadrant' longer than 11 milliseconds the devices become ineffective.

For color: You should use Red and Blue, they are at the 2 ends of the visible spectrum, to stand out from the background. Personally we think the random color schemes of R,G,B are better. However as human we see them as blinking devices, some users expressed their concern if devices have any affect on those with seizure. It was not our position to argue of the blinking of Christmas lights but go ahead to use red & blue instead.

Again. in the lab we can tell if one is better than the other, but in live test we just don't see those annoying mosquitoes around. Are they the same?

In our limit observations, some predatory insects show more attracting to certain color. It will be the job of the generations to come. We are too 'old' and too limited to explore.

BLACKFLIES:

I have to google to know what they are. I have no idea if i works. For sure the schemes are not effective on  daylight insects: butterflies, bees, dragonflies, wasp, food flies, houseflies.....
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ballscrewbob on Aug 02, 2020, 06:05 am
Yes I need to take into account both mozzies AND blackflies.
Blackflies (http://www.algonquinpark.on.ca/visit/park_management/mosquitoes-and-blackflies-(biting-insects).php) are not household flies btw.

They have overlapping times but the blackflies have a shorter time duration's (thankfully) and we have seen them force Moose out from thier normal habitat due to the bites as they seem to swarm (they dont but can often be seen in larger quantities than mozzies.

Maybe an alternating pattern could be used to repel both species ?

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 02, 2020, 06:52 am
Yes I need to take into account both mozzies AND blackflies.

The devices repel most nocturnal insects, fruit vegetables in my backyard reduce their yield to almost zero. Only with the one that have their bright white and afternoon blossoming flowers; they depend on nocturnal for pollination?

We have some limited success on houseflies it may need more twisting please give me some time. I have some physical and linguistic limitations to post. Then you can try both and work from there.

The common wisdom thought all insects are the same. Our observations do not support the notion. We can not tell until and after we try.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 02, 2020, 07:37 am
BLACK FLIES.

FYI: The more nocturnal the insects are the blacker their eyes color (to absorb more photons). and daylight insect normally have brown or brighter color. They use them as color filters.

This is my initial assessment.

In Google images of the black flies, there are at least two different species.

One with black eyes. I assume that they are nocturnal insects and the device should work.

The other with brown eyes the same color of the houseflies they use the bright light of the day to navigate. I don't think the device work.

Just some experiences and observations.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 02, 2020, 08:40 pm
Implementation on LED strip.



Actually you can drive 2 led strips using handful of diodes to control the timing of an AC. 1 blue strip and 1 red strip.


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=375853)

For each back to back pair of diodes the voltage drop 0.7 V at the same time it  opens the resting  gap wider.
 
In the case of 12 V input LED strip You may use 24 VAC with (24-12)/0.7 = 17 pairs to drive BLUE and RED as above. (The AC drive red with forward current and blue with the reversed)
The red and blue LED(s) should be place next to each other.

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 04, 2020, 12:52 am
If for any reasons you are anxious to go into production phase.

Then

Attached is schematic file.

And:

H&48R002 optical file (https://drive.google.com/file/d/189Br0AAqRRPLe51VdS9CTh1QulM2v2v2/view?usp=sharing)

What it does?:
    Red 2 seconds
    Green 2 seconds
    Blue 2 seconds
    Loop:
        Red on; delay 500 microseconds
        Red off; delay 500 microseconds
        Blue on; delay 500 microseconds
        Blue off; delay 500 microseconds
    Goto loop:


Now a days PCB/PCBA vendors (ebay?) will do all of that for you with the 2 files. (assuming that you give them the picture of the USB stick on first picture of the topic) at minimum setup cost and of course some mark ups.

Or:

You supply the OPT file to MCU vendors (in China - At Alibaba)- They will burn the MCU you at no cost. (total at $0.08 ->$0.12. each).

Then:

Either you can supply other components (LED + Resistors + Capacitor) or the PCB/PCBA vendor will take up to give you turnkey product.

-You can draw PCB yourselves or they can do it for you.


The final products are just the 2mm thick PCB.  (Depend on your shopping skill and quantity you may have them in less than a quarter a piece).  They will be ready in a week + shipping even in hundred thousands.

The picture shows just PCB with standard options: 2 mm thick, white solder mask and gold plated.

Good luck.




Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 11, 2020, 03:22 pm
Housefly Control

.Video (https://drive.google.com/file/d/13kmCpP0l1aFWFajgg5r9dfw6zO0e-rpB/view?usp=sharing)

Perhaps the most requested from users is a houseflies control device.

This post is for  educational purpose. the information are for the community to be able to take off even further and further.[/i]

Things to be considered:

- Compare to mosquitoes, houseflies are mush faster -- we need to increase speed.

- It obvious that houseflies are very sensitive to react to moving objects, the device need to portrait such illusions.

Observations and feedback:

- Under a mosquito repelling light strip there are some activities that the flies indeed fly far far away however the results were not consistent.

- Feedback from fishing community show some density reductions under dual purposed light bulbs.

Putting all together we have some experiment on the device below:

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=376998)

sketch:
Code: [Select]

int blue[]={A0,A2,A4,3,5,7,9,11};
int yellow[]={A1,A3,A5,2,4,6,8,10};
#define BLUE_ON(x) digitalWrite(blue[x],false)
#define BLUE_OFF(x) digitalWrite(blue[x],true)
#define YELLOW_ON(x) digitalWrite(yellow[x],false)
#define YELLOW_OFF(x) digitalWrite(yellow[x],true)

void setup() {
 
  int x;
  for(x=0;x<8;x++)
    {
      pinMode(blue[x],OUTPUT);
      BLUE_ON(x); delay (1000);BLUE_OFF(x);
      pinMode(yellow[x],OUTPUT);
      YELLOW_ON(x); delay (1000);YELLOW_OFF(x);
    }

}
void my_delay()
{
  delayMicroseconds(250);
}
void loop() {
 
  int b;
  b=1;
  while(1)
    {
     
      b=(b+random(1,7)) & 7;
     
      BLUE_ON(b);  my_delay();BLUE_OFF(b);my_delay();
      YELLOW_ON(b);  my_delay();YELLOW_OFF(b);my_delay();

      b=(b+random(1,7)) & 7;
      YELLOW_ON(b);  my_delay();YELLOW_OFF(b);my_delay();
      BLUE_ON(b);  my_delay();BLUE_OFF(b); my_delay();
    }
}
// Although the previous are from my Sketch, I think this way is better, It have the yellow and the blue acting independently.



The device showed good results, It have been shelved for about 5 years while we pursued the testing protocol.

I post this as an unfinished project it may need more works other variables such the distances, the placement forma of the LED, the  effective areas . . . . or perhaps to reprogram to have the strip presenting itself as directional moving illusions . . . .

Good luck.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, a simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 13, 2020, 03:02 pm
Other of interesting.

Yellow areas are not mosquito repelling, rather they are attractive

The experiments that showed yellow is mosquito favor color missed a clue. They put individual color traps for a long period then counted the catch. Under daylight yellow is nullified.

This experiment.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=377285)

More than 50% of the sample will be in the yellow area, then white . . . 
Red is the least.

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 14, 2020, 08:19 pm
Housefly control continue. . . . .


Personally I think the following code is much better. It has yellow & blue run crisscrossed because the targeted are notably sensitive to motion.



Code: [Select]

int blue[]={A0,A2,A4,3,5,7,9,11};
int yellow[]={A1,A3,A5,2,4,6,8,10};
#define BLUE_ON(x) digitalWrite(blue[x],false)
#define BLUE_OFF(x) digitalWrite(blue[x],true)
#define YELLOW_ON(x) digitalWrite(yellow[x],false)
#define YELLOW_OFF(x) digitalWrite(yellow[x],true)

void setup() {
  
  int x;
  for(x=0;x<8;x++)
    {
      pinMode(blue[x],OUTPUT);
      BLUE_ON(x); delay (1000);BLUE_OFF(x);
      pinMode(yellow[x],OUTPUT);
      YELLOW_ON(x); delay (1000);YELLOW_OFF(x);
    }

}
void my_delay()
{
  delayMicroseconds(100);
}
void loop() {
  
  int a,b;
  
  while(1)
    {
      
    /* Blue runs forward  Yellow backward  */

      for(a=0,b=7;a<8;a++,b--)
        {
         BLUE_ON(a);  my_delay();BLUE_OFF(a);my_delay();
         YELLOW_ON(b);  my_delay();YELLOW_OFF(b);my_delay();
        }

      /* REVERSE  */  

      for(a=0,b=7;a<8;a++,b--)
        {
         BLUE_ON(b);  my_delay();BLUE_OFF(b);my_delay();
         YELLOW_ON(a);  my_delay();YELLOW_OFF(a);my_delay();
        }  
      
    }

}


Side effects:

At night, the settings turned into  magnet to predatory insects . . . As the consequence there were spider nets appear in the back of the light. I am not sure that they come b/c of the repelled insects or the predatory or both.

Again:

Happy mosquito free !!!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, a simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 17, 2020, 01:21 pm
Larva control. Some simple and environmental methods.

Before we were able to locate mosquito or larva vendors.

For  more than 4 years we reared of wild mosquito in the backyard we think we opt to share some experiences, please take them as starting points, We trust that the ingenuity of the community can take the ideas to go further and further.

During plagues countries used task force to come to neighborhoods to kill mosquitoes and larvae.  They mainly concentrated to work on around the house water bodies. They either drained or using chemicals.
The methods are kind of simple, very simple alternatives.

For small water bodies such as a lily flower vases; all they need are some ice. making it chill, very chill. Simple huh? It may not work with some up north species.

For larger body such as 55 gallon drum. - In rural area people use to cook and drink. There are not one, depend on the availability at the locals.

The purpose is to build a thin CO2 layer over the water surface. It kills the larvae.

    - The most simple method is to drop in a finger size dry ice, then loosely close the lid.

    - Beside dry ice user can use a hanging jar that contains baking soda and vinegar to generate CO2. or. Baking soda & citric acid. If you introduce CO2 from a compressed tank, you need to do it slowly, it needs about 4 gallon of CO2 for haft full 55 gallon tank.  - They need lids too.

The above methods take about 10 minutes to have them all killed by suffocation.

    - If there are air guns and if the containers tolerate a shot such as pellet gun - We don't need ammunition just the air, give them a shot at about 30 cm below the surface. They got killed by pressure shock such as those (bad) people fish by introduce explosion.

In the case that all the above tool are not available. There is other method that prevent them to come to the surface to breath by gradually sinking a piece of clean cloth or mesh with a small weight in the middle. You need some kind of a ring to keep the mesh form sinking all the way and to prevent them form escaping upward. we set them dry then sank them by adding water to the tank. Try you best but don't worry, with the weight you can catch them by quickly lifting the mesh. 10 minutes.?

Happy mosquito free.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 21, 2020, 03:01 pm
Cockroach control . . . . Yes !!!!  COCKROACH CONTROL.

It's not a new technology but its usage. Please look at the post only as a part of knowledge transferring attempt.

Years back, feedback from users brought the feature to our attention. At the time we were too occupied with the pursuing with a protocol to prove the effectiveness of the device in repelling mosquitoes, the endeavor itself have taken us more than 5 years to develop, we simply are not equipped to such  multitasks, one per branch of the insects: houseflies, roaches. . . .

It'e undeniable the effectiveness of the ultrasonic devices on the little roaches, but  cockroach, they are immune.

IT NOT FOR US THO THINK FOR THE INSECTS RATHER FOR US TO LEARN HOW TO THINK THE WAY THEY DO . . . . .IN ORDER TO WORK FROM THERE


The cardinal rule: It not if the ares are lit. They look at the light source as a 'coming' predator.
It only occupies as very small portion of the viewpoint The partitions of the lenses of their eye give them the instance indication where it comes from, the res; 99% are safe for them to go to. One interest observation: Some mosquitoes hid behind their own shadow.

Going back to cockroach controlling topic.



Happy Mosquito Free !!!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 24, 2020, 03:26 pm
Protocol to test if a technology does repel mosquitoes.

For complete disclosure we suggest a simple, inexpensive equipment set to test the technology of your own. You don't have to do the complex one as described in the paper which need few hundreds sample to make the point. The following allows you to test from a few as a dozen or so.

Main components

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=378775)



(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=378777)

You light should not be more than single LED, too much will cause them stay put rather than to react. It is set to aim at the cone, to reflect upward to the foil for the animal to see to react.

The purpose of the foil is to limit the scope of the samples, preventing them to think there are safe places at the back of the light. The way it's set to allow operator to be able to observe their movement during the process.

The igloo is set up a if it is a rearing chamber, we actually do.

Process:

Using normal indoor as the background.
It's optional if you want additional light to lure darker area.

If the technology does work, there may be exceptions, they move out to the open area.
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Aug 31, 2020, 12:08 pm
Mosquito repelling light an alternative.

The instruction in the original post needs costumed PCBs. The following is the utilization of 8 bit W2812 RGB strips. Which are widely available for you to have something to get a quick start.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61e3uJi1xML._AC_SL1000_.jpg)



Beside the 5V, GRN, all it needs is a DIN pin to D8 to work with the following sketch.


Code: [Select]



/*---------------------------------------------------------------------
  Acrobotic - 01/10/2013
  Author: x1sc0
  Platforms: Arduino Uno R3
  File: bitbang_whitish.ino

  Description:
  This code sample accompanies the "How To Control 'Smart' RGB LEDs:
  WS2811, WS2812, and WS2812B (Bitbanging Tutorial)" Instructable
  (http://www.instructables.com/id/Bitbanging-step-by-step-Arduino-control-of-WS2811-/)
 
  The code illustrates how to continuously set one WS2811 (driver)/
  WS2812/WS2812B RGB LEDs to a full intensity whitish.  The color and
  number of WS281X ICs can be easily modified to explore the full range of
  these wonderful family of LEDs.
 
  The communication is done by bitbanging a self-clocked 800KHz, NZR signal. 
  The implementation was done using assembly so that the timing of the signal
  was extremely accurate.

  Usage:
  Connect power (5V), ground (GND), and the Arduino Uno pin defined
  by DIGITAL_PIN to the WS281X ports VCC, GND, and DIN ports, respectively.

  Upload the program to an Arduino Uno, and the Green LED of the first
  WS281X will light up to full brightness.

  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  For a full-blown Arduino library, check out:
  https://github.com/acrobotic/Ai_Library_WS281X/
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  Please consider buying products from Acrobotic to help fund future
  Open-Source projects like this! We’ll always put our best effort in every
  project, and release all our design files and code for you to use.
  http://acrobotic.com/
  ------------------------------------------------------------------------
  License:
  Beerware License; if you find the code useful, and we happen to cross
  paths, you're encouraged to buy us a beer. The code is distributed hoping
  that you in fact find it useful, but  without warranty of any kind.
------------------------------------------------------------------------*/
#define NUM_RGB       (8)         // Number of WS281X we have connected
#define NUM_BYTES     (NUM_RGB*3) // Number of LEDs (3 per each WS281X)
#define DIGITAL_PIN   (8)         // Digital port number
#define PORT          (PORTB)     // Digital pin's port
#define PORT_PIN      (PORTB0)    // Digital pin's bit position
#define R             (255)        // Intensity of Red LED
#define G             (255)        // Intensity of Green LED
#define B             (255)        // Intensity of Blue LED

#define NUM_BITS      (8)         // Constant value: bits per byte

uint8_t* rgb_arr = NULL;
uint8_t rgb_red [NUM_BYTES];
uint8_t rgb_green[NUM_BYTES];
uint8_t rgb_blue [NUM_BYTES];
uint8_t rgb_clear[NUM_BYTES];
uint32_t t_f;

void setup()
{
  pinMode(DIGITAL_PIN,OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite(DIGITAL_PIN,0);
  int x;
  for(x=0;x<NUM_RGB;x++)
      setColorRGB(x,R,0,0,rgb_red);
     
  for(x=0;x<NUM_RGB;x++)
      setColorRGB(x,0,G,0,rgb_green);
     
  for(x=0;x<NUM_RGB;x++)
      setColorRGB(x,0,0,B,rgb_blue);

  for(x=0;x<NUM_RGB;x++)
      setColorRGB(x,0,0,0,rgb_clear);     


 
  if((rgb_arr = (uint8_t *)malloc(NUM_BYTES)))             
  {                 
    memset(rgb_arr, 0, NUM_BYTES);                         
  }       
  render();
}

void loop()
{
  int i;
  long mg,mt;
//  Serial.begin(9600); for timing verification
  while(1)
    {
//      mg=micros();
      for(i=0;i<100;i++)
        {     
        rgb_arr=rgb_red;    render(); delayMicroseconds(250);
        rgb_arr=rgb_clear;  render(); delayMicroseconds(250);
        rgb_arr=rgb_blue;   render(); delayMicroseconds(250);
        rgb_arr=rgb_clear;  render(); delayMicroseconds(250);
        }
//       mg=(micros()-mg)/100;;
//       Serial.println(mg);
     
    }


}
/*
void setColorRGB(uint16_t idx, uint8_t r, uint8_t g, uint8_t b)
{
  if(idx < NUM_RGB)
  {
    uint8_t *p = &rgb_arr[idx*3];
    *p++ = g; 
    *p++ = r;
    *p = b;
  }
}
*/
void setColorRGB(uint16_t idx, uint8_t r, uint8_t g, uint8_t b, uint8_t *ARRAY)
{
  if(idx < NUM_RGB)
  {
    uint8_t *p = &ARRAY[idx*3];
    *p++ = g; 
    *p++ = r;
    *p = b;
  }
}






void render(void)
{
  if(!rgb_arr) return;

  while((micros() - t_f) < 50L);  // wait for 50us (data latch)

  cli(); // Disable interrupts so that timing is as precise as possible
  volatile uint8_t 
   *p    = rgb_arr,   // Copy the start address of our data array
    val  = *p++,      // Get the current byte value & point to next byte
    high = PORT |  _BV(PORT_PIN), // Bitmask for sending HIGH to pin
    low  = PORT & ~_BV(PORT_PIN), // Bitmask for sending LOW to pin
    tmp  = low,       // Swap variable to adjust duty cycle
    nbits= NUM_BITS;  // Bit counter for inner loop
  volatile uint16_t
    nbytes = NUM_BYTES; // Byte counter for outer loop
  asm volatile(

   "nextbit:\n\t"         // -    label                       (T =  0)
    "sbi  %0, %1\n\t"     // 2    signal HIGH                 (T =  2)
    "sbrc %4, 7\n\t"      // 1-2  if MSB set                  (T =  ?)         
     "mov  %6, %3\n\t"    // 0-1   tmp'll set signal high     (T =  4)
    "dec  %5\n\t"         // 1    decrease bitcount           (T =  5)
    "nop\n\t"             // 1    nop (idle 1 clock cycle)    (T =  6)
    "st   %a2, %6\n\t"    // 2    set PORT to tmp             (T =  8)
    "mov  %6, %7\n\t"     // 1    reset tmp to low (default)  (T =  9)
    "breq nextbyte\n\t"   // 1-2  if bitcount ==0 -> nextbyte (T =  ?)               
    "rol  %4\n\t"         // 1    shift MSB leftwards         (T = 11)
    "rjmp .+0\n\t"        // 2    nop nop                     (T = 13)
    "cbi   %0, %1\n\t"    // 2    signal LOW                  (T = 15)
    "rjmp .+0\n\t"        // 2    nop nop                     (T = 17)
    "nop\n\t"             // 1    nop                         (T = 18)
    "rjmp nextbit\n\t"    // 2    bitcount !=0 -> nextbit     (T = 20)
   "nextbyte:\n\t"        // -    label                       -
    "ldi  %5, 8\n\t"      // 1    reset bitcount              (T = 11)
    "ld   %4, %a8+\n\t"   // 2    val = *p++                  (T = 13)
    "cbi   %0, %1\n\t"    // 2    signal LOW                  (T = 15)
    "rjmp .+0\n\t"        // 2    nop nop                     (T = 17)
    "nop\n\t"             // 1    nop                         (T = 18)
    "dec %9\n\t"          // 1    decrease bytecount          (T = 19)
    "brne nextbit\n\t"    // 2    if bytecount !=0 -> nextbit (T = 20)
    ::
    // Input operands         Operand Id (w/ constraint)
    "I" (_SFR_IO_ADDR(PORT)), // %0
    "I" (PORT_PIN),           // %1
    "e" (&PORT),              // %a2
    "r" (high),               // %3
    "r" (val),                // %4
    "r" (nbits),              // %5
    "r" (tmp),                // %6
    "r" (low),                // %7
    "e" (p),                  // %a8
    "w" (nbytes)              // %9
  );
  sei();                          // Enable interrupts
  t_f = micros();                 // t_f will be used to measure the 50us
                                  // latching period in the next call of the
                                  // function.
}





!!!! Happy Mosquito Free. !!!!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ballscrewbob on Aug 31, 2020, 07:42 pm
Yay thats what I was looking for !

Thanks ephitran.

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 01, 2020, 02:44 am
You are welcome!

Again! Please to have at least 2.  preferred of 4 at 4 corners i. They don't need to be in sync.

We like to see you success at the first try.


Happy Mosquito Free !!!!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 01, 2020, 06:57 pm
Mosquito repelling even simpler

Sorry! I didn't realize that many of you don't have easy access for PCB making.

The followings is suggest of a configuration using 5 mm RGB LED.


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=380098)


Notes:



Again: Please build at least 2 per location. It's never enough to emphasize this notion.

Happy Mosquito Free!

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: colemanbro on Sep 09, 2020, 10:53 am
I know that in Florida these mosquitoes have already bitten some residents to death and this really sucks because these insects are real carriers of infections and viruses. I once read an article on the Igetrid.com (https://Igetrid.com) that described several strategies on how to get rid of mosquitoes and it seemed incredibly useful to me. Now I know where to apply it, and I will do it, do not hesitate. In General this website has many answers to questions that you often googled but were afraid to ask
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 10, 2020, 08:28 pm
FYI: 1 EXAMPLE:

As said before, The settings are not intuitive. at the minimum the the instructions need to be followed. Again the lights do not established the mosquito repelling areas, The animal just avoid entering the area where they "see" the lights in direct line. The shadows are not. But they will not travel more than about  2'-1/2, or about 75 cm exposed to get into the shadows or the objects. The shadows themselves may be highways for them to get to you.


In Texas, A 3000 square foot house on a 100' x 200' lot in an mosquito infested area.

We use 6, 10' tall solar powered units at  corners and on the sides at about 100' apart. Once in awhile we got bitten, Using logic of "forensic" investigators we found out  the main carrier was the dog they hitched hike underneath her belly. A surprised effective radius.

With 2 more additional "traps" inside, We have the whole house mosquito free. (Still got bitten once ever few months).

The front and the back yards are basically mosquito free 24/7.

Warning: One will certainly get multiple bites almost instantly as soon as he/she goes NEAR  the border as if they are readily ambushing and waiting for their meals.

Happy Mosquito Free !!!!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 10, 2020, 08:44 pm
The very common mistake on the use of the lights.

Put it in front of the doors.  From the top or the roof, the mosquitoes don't like to see the light when they are in front of the doors, where then can go? The back of the light door; doors, their jams.... They provide plenty of hiding places waiting for an opportunity to get in.

Other Common Mistake: Quickly putting 1 light less than 2 meter low and near you. Then tell other that it's does not work. They use their shadow for the animals to come and their bodies are safe, hiding places. You need at least 2, at least 3,4 meter part to nullify the shadows of one another because the effective 'areas' are in cone shape.

Happy Mosquito Free!!!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 12, 2020, 03:09 pm
FYI:   OLD MANUAL (https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bx2ZQKgmbl3PWlJWN2VrY2tyMGpkUklEOVotal9YeVZLNVhR/view?usp=sharing)

It's 5,6 years old but useful, the technology is very much the same.

Please do not contact 1Repel. I am truly happy doing what I cam called for.

Happy Mosquito Free !!!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 18, 2020, 05:42 am
Programming  LED Strip to repel mosquitoes.


In the net there are  guides to use Arduino to control LED Strip such as ( Ultimate Guide to Connecting LED Light Strips to Arduino (https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/connect-led-light-strips-arduino/)).

I like their schematic:

Please follow their BOM & other instruction .

(https://www.makeuseof.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/12v-fritzing_670.jpg)

Then Code need to be modified accordingly:

Code: [Select]

#define RED_LED 6
#define BLUE_LED 5
#define GREEN_LED 9
// Per schematic the LEDs pins, set HIGH to turn ON.

//#define RED_ON digitalWrite(RED_LED,false)
//#define RED_OFF digitalWrite(RED_LED,true)
//#define BLUE_ON digitalWrite(BLUE_LED,false)
//#define BLUE_OFF digitalWrite(BLUE_LED,true)

#define RED_ON digitalWrite(RED_LED,true)
#define RED_OFF digitalWrite(RED_LED,false)
#define BLUE_ON digitalWrite(BLUE_LED,true)
#define BLUE_OFF digitalWrite(BLUE_LED,false)


void setup() {
pinMode(RED_LED, OUTPUT);
RED_OFF;
pinMode(BLUE_LED, OUTPUT);
BLUE_OFF;
}
void loop() {
// optional testing procedures
while(1){
RED_ON;
delayMicroseconds(500);
RED_OFF;
delayMicroseconds(500);
BLUE_ON;
delayMicroseconds(500);
BLUE_OFF;
delayMicroseconds(500);
}
}




Happy Mosqutio Free!!!
Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 20, 2020, 09:19 pm
Better circuit.

I like this schematic because the circuits do not share the same ground. We don't know how stable is the supply power supply come with the strip, they are often fluctuating.

   The above schematic only works in the assumption that the black (or white) wire is the common anode, Some manufacture have that wire as the common cathode which is more common now because they only draw (+) power when needed.

This what I propose:

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=382547)
They are N channel mosfets

Advantages:


Some of my strips have common cathode. In this case:


Happy Mosquito Free!


Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 22, 2020, 11:23 pm
Agriculture applications:

--- I like to dedicate this post and the followings to discuss the matter--- Please stay tuned --- It will be updated as soon as anything come up.

Some of our users from hour homeland expressed interest in using the technology in their (rice) field.

Technological background information.


Observation:.

These our observations at our sizable front lawn and backyard and garden.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-MzsxLELzZBQ/WZFz1JqmTCI/AAAAAAAAH08/aXE6p1Eu6tk2Uei0XOpfbi4sH5_LCPLYQCHMYCw/s1600/Hoa%2Bc%25C3%25A2y%2Bb%25E1%25BA%25A7u.jpg)


(https://live.staticflickr.com/7361/8764134418_3b43f83d33.jpg)


Obviously this is a big, big help as an environmental pest control measure to come.

I propose:

A 360 degree (from USB LED strip?) solar powered devices to be placed about 3 meter high and spacing at 360 feet or 100 meter apart on the field.


Negative impact.



OVERALL ASSESSMENT: It only helps, how much helps, not hurts.

Happy Mosquito Free!




Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 26, 2020, 08:08 pm
Small test from yesterday.

A few days after the tropical Betas passed south Texas, the lawn became "infested" with small leaf eating insects, 5-6 jumped and hopped with every one's step. Some are tiny about 2x of the mosquitoes, other are about 1/2" moth like). At the same time at the treated front yard were virtually none.. And mosquitoes too!

This is the yard (70' x 70' ?) with the location of the device that was placed at 11' (feet) high. It was ON since 5-6 PM yesterday.

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=383278)


And the device: It was vertically installed to have 2 units pointing to the lawn, the upper is not used. (It was designed for ceiling mounted position to cover all around, 360 degrees.)

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=383276)

This morning: All have gone (Sorry for the neighbor where all mosquitoes go !!!! -- A lot, a lot of them I was nice to him and he's not deserved)

Happy Mosquito Free!

Title: Re: Mosquito control, an simple optical method
Post by: ephitran on Sep 27, 2020, 09:30 am
AGRICULTURAL APPLICATION:

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=383319)

There are several issues that need further discussion:

(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=696013.0;attach=383317)



Happy Mosquitoes Free!