Arduino Forum

Using Arduino => General Electronics => Topic started by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 08, 2020, 07:51 pm

Title: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 08, 2020, 07:51 pm
Just got a fairly basic Arduino kit and started learning with it. Loving it so far...except in one respect: Trying to insert resistor leads into the breadboard is driving me nuts.

The resistors that came with the kit have very thin, flimsy leads that would rather bend themselves into squiggles than go into a breadboard hole. It's gotten so frustrating that I've started putting a female-male jumper wire on each end of a resistor and then plugging those jumpers into the breadboard. This works better, but of course it makes the project a hairy mess and introduces more connections to troubleshoot when something doesn't work.

I saw a post online that suggested the solution was to get 1/2 watt resistors instead of 1/4 watt, because the 1/2 watt resistors would have stouter leads. Is that a reliable way to find resistors that will be easier to install in a breadboard? Or is it possible to buy 1/2 watt resistors and still end up with thin, spaghetti-legged leads?

Are there any other reliable ways to find resistors with thicker leads?

Thanks.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: PaulRB on Sep 08, 2020, 07:55 pm
1/4W resistors are normally fine with breadboards. Are you sure they are 1/4W and not 1/8W or 1/10W? 
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: PerryBebbington on Sep 08, 2020, 08:02 pm
If you cut off the end of the wires with side cutters they end up with a chisel shape at the cut end. If you orient that correctly with the spring contacts in the breadboard they go in more easily.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: PaulRB on Sep 08, 2020, 08:12 pm
Here are 1/2W, 1/4W and 1/8W (or maybe 1/10W). Even with the smallest, no problem inserting them into the breadboard.
(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=704236.0;attach=381046)
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: AJLElectronics on Sep 08, 2020, 08:17 pm
Long nose pliers can give you a positive contact if all else fails.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: dougp on Sep 08, 2020, 10:14 pm
Long nose pliers can give you a positive contact if all else fails.
Or tweezers.  Or hemostats.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: aarg on Sep 09, 2020, 01:34 am
I think I know what you mean. I ordered a bunch of 1/4W and they all have incredibly thin leads. Try to keep the leads no longer than what it takes to reach the nearest hole, and then bridge it with wire jumpers if you can.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: JohnRob on Sep 09, 2020, 04:00 am
Since you have some male breadboard jumpers try putting the male jumper in the breadboard hole before you insert the resistor.   Some breadboard socket need to be used a couple of time before they loosen up.


BTW it took a lot of restraint on my part not to compare this situation to an more organic situation.

John
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: SteveMann on Sep 09, 2020, 05:12 am
Try to keep the leads no longer than what it takes to reach the nearest hole...
No. You still need another 1/4" to go into the hole.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: Smajdalf on Sep 09, 2020, 06:30 am
But another resistors. I got similar hard to use thin leg resistors with my starter set. All other resistors I bought have standard (?) thickness of leads. But keep those with thin legs - they are easier to work with when soldering, they can be very easily shaped to the right position.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: pourduino on Sep 09, 2020, 06:34 am
I don't know if this problem exists in other places too, but I live in a third world country and the shops here usually buy their inventory from cheap Chinese suppliers. Because of that sometimes you get resistors with super thin and flimsy legs.
Breadboards are also very different. Some have very loose holes some have very stiff holes.

My guess is you are having one of those stiff breadboards with thin legged resistors.
You can try loosening up the breadboard holes by sticking a needle into all holes. Doing this over and over again should loosen it up a little bit.

Loose holes aren't good but I prefer them to soldering something to every resistor.

Alternatively you can try buying resistors from an actual shop where you can test the legs yourself.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: hammy on Sep 09, 2020, 08:17 am
The quality of the breadboard comes into this too . I've a couple of cheap ones from eBay and it can be almost impossible to get wires into some of the holes .
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: MarkT on Sep 09, 2020, 01:04 pm
Combination of cheap chinese resistors and poor breadboard?  I've found K&H breadboards to be good, and
some have 6 contacts per strip rather than the usual 5, which is very handy.

If you have calipers or micrometer you can measure the resistor lead thickness. 0.6mm is standard for
1/3 watt (0207), and 0.5mm for 1/8 watt (0204).  I've seen chinese 1/3rd watt resistors with 0.4mm leads, which means
they can't dissipate 1/3W in reality as there's too little metal in the leads to conduct it away.

Here's a site with some clear dimensional drawings, though they call 1/3rd watt "1/4th watt" as they
are still living back in the old days of carbon film resistors.  Metal film have higher operating temperatures
so they are often rated at 1/3rd or 0.4 watt at the 0207 size.

http://www.villageinframe.com/through-hole-resistor-footprint/ (http://www.villageinframe.com/through-hole-resistor-footprint/)
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: PaulRB on Sep 09, 2020, 02:07 pm
I've found K&H breadboards to be good, and some have 6 contacts per strip rather than the usual 5, which is very handy.
+1. Check out my picture from post #3.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: MarkT on Sep 09, 2020, 02:14 pm
+1. Check out my picture from post #3.
Yes that's one of the good breadboards!

Incidentally talking about tweezers as someone was, this is a good idea, and insulated tweezers are
a great idea when working with breadboards in case you forgot to power it off, I recommend ceramic
tipped tweezers, they are very strong, don't conduct electricity or heat, and handle high temperatures,
so they are brilliant when soldering too.  Plastic tweezers aren't as good at gripping but are a second
choice (except for the soldering when they are a wrong choice!).
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: Paul__B on Sep 10, 2020, 01:03 pm
The rough plastic tweezers that come in common medical dressing packs are pretty much useless for gripping anything!

However disposable instruments are now frequently used for minor surgery instead of having to certify "in-house" sterilising, so if you can arrange to intercept the used (and suitably washed) instruments, the tweezers and suture holders are particularly useful (though the tweezers are often too coarse for the job).  :smiley-lol:
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 10, 2020, 05:40 pm
Why haven't you posted a photo of these 'squiggly' resistors ?
I assume you don't have calipers to measure the OD ?
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 11, 2020, 02:45 am
Thanks for the replies and advice, everybody. I've resorted to needle-nose pliers a few times, and I'm going to try that trick of clipping the leads with a side cutter.

Meanwhile, I think the breadboard that came with this kit may have been a big contributing factor. I just got a Sunfounder holder for an UNO/MEGA (and/or a Raspberry Pi) and a breadboard, and it came with a breadboard that's given me no serious trouble so far with these resistors. That's only one of the reasons I wish I'd gotten one of these holders sooner.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 11, 2020, 03:13 am
BTW it took a lot of restraint on my part not to compare this situation to an more organic situation.
I wasn't going to say anything. :D
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 11, 2020, 07:06 am
Does it start with 's' and end with 't' ?
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: Paul__B on Sep 11, 2020, 02:19 pm
I was thinking of ending in "k".  But say no more.  :smiley-roll-sweat:
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 11, 2020, 06:59 pm
I was thinking of ending in "k".  But say no more.  :smiley-roll-sweat:
Wink-wink, nudge-nudge.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: srnet on Sep 11, 2020, 08:00 pm
I use breadboards fairly often, cheap ones from the far East.

About 99% of the time I use the 1/8W wired resistors, so no big wires.

Dont have a problem poking the ends into the holes myself, no complaints from the breadboard either.   

 
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 11, 2020, 10:04 pm
STILL NO PHOTO OF THE ISSUE
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 15, 2020, 05:59 am
STILL NO PHOTO OF THE ISSUE
Thanks, but the problem seems to be resolved. As I posted above, it was not so much the resistors as the breadboard. I've since gotten two breadboards that work fine with the same kind of resistors I was having trouble with. Old breadboard is in the bin.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 15, 2020, 06:07 am
I have a news flash for you.
It isn't all about you.
This is an OPEN SOURCE forum.
There are people reading your post wondering
what you are talking about because they've never
used a breadboard or seen a resistor for that matter. Providing photos allows them to learn
'virtually' so that they can learn what to purchase and what to avoid when they decide to take the first step. Now they'll never know...
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: aarg on Sep 16, 2020, 12:59 am
Be careful what you ask for around here. :)


(https://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=704236.0;attach=381944)
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 16, 2020, 03:56 am
What does 'spagetti legs ' mean ?
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: dougp on Sep 16, 2020, 04:03 am
What does 'spagetti legs ' mean ?
To me it means the component leads are so flimsy they bend when you push them into the breadboard - unless you're using the aforementioned tweezers clamped on within a quarter inch of the end of the lead.  Breadboard insertion resistance could also be a factor.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 16, 2020, 10:56 am
Must be someone in Italy using that description.
Here in the USA we would just say 'crappy' or 'flimsy'
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: AJLElectronics on Sep 16, 2020, 11:07 am
Must be someone in Italy using that description.
Here in the USA we would just say 'crappy' or 'flimsy'
But then you in the USA claim to power your vehicles with "gas" and can't spell words like colour and labour.  :smiley-mr-green:  :smiley-mr-green:
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 16, 2020, 11:29 am
I beg to differ.
We can spell.
You just can't read.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: UKHeliBob on Sep 16, 2020, 03:35 pm
Quote
We can spell.
but you can't solder  :)
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 16, 2020, 03:58 pm
"but you can't solder  "

Well that''s not my soldering but it is ugly,
I'll give you that..."
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: UKHeliBob on Sep 16, 2020, 05:02 pm
Quote
Well that''s not my soldering but it is ugly,
Missed joke alert !

Americans don't solder anything, they sodder it
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: PerryBebbington on Sep 16, 2020, 05:36 pm
Americans don't solder anything, they sodder it
That explains something I read in a catalogue a long time ago 'sloddering irons'.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: CrossRoads on Sep 16, 2020, 07:53 pm
How do you pronounce  it PerryB? I've never heard the L vocalized.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: PerryBebbington on Sep 16, 2020, 08:34 pm
How do you pronounce  it PerryB? I've never heard the L vocalized.
I was being silly and a bit unfair. The word in the catalogue was clearly a spelling mistake and not meant to be the American word for solder.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 16, 2020, 10:20 pm
Must be someone in Italy using that description.
Here in the USA we would just say 'crappy' or 'flimsy'
Were you unable to read the text of the original post?
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: aarg on Sep 17, 2020, 12:44 am
All slang, and some colourful metaphors is/are hard to translate. Correct technical English is more appropriate on a technical forum. Even lingo in different flavours of English can be confusing.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 17, 2020, 02:00 am
All slang, and some colourful metaphors is/are hard to translate. Correct technical English is more appropriate on a technical forum. Even lingo in different flavours of English can be confusing.
I'm not sure translation is the issue. The only person who seems to have had trouble understanding the "spaghetti" metaphor appears to understand English. What I find confusing is that he/she suggests that "here in the USA" we'd just use the word "flimsy" -- but I actually *did* use the word "flimsy" in the text of the original post.
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 17, 2020, 03:11 am
Most people use needle nose pliers to insert the
resistors so they don't have that problem.
It all about using the proper tool.
I don't see the harm in injecting a bit of humor.
Maybe you shouldn't be so sensitive.

https://youtu.be/BnbcTtMptkU (https://youtu.be/BnbcTtMptkU)
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: AJLElectronics on Sep 17, 2020, 10:01 am
I don't see the harm in injecting a bit of humor.*


* Humour.  :smiley-mr-green:  :smiley-mr-green:
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 17, 2020, 11:30 am
"All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy..."

Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: UKHeliBob on Sep 17, 2020, 12:14 pm
Quote
"https://youtu.be/BnbcTtMptkU"
Thank you, but I know exactly how to pronounce solder  :)
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 17, 2020, 02:11 pm
"Thank you, but I know exactly how to pronounce solder  "

You can 'talk the talk' , but can you 'walk the walk "
?

There's a website with an AI with a female asian
voice pronouncing it with the "L", ("soLder")
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: MarkT on Sep 17, 2020, 03:05 pm
Some people may not realise British English and American English differ here, British pronounce solder
like boulder, colder, folder, shoulder, ie have anglicized the original French word ('souder') both in spelling
and pronuciation, whereas American English is closer to the French.

The original latin word is 'solidaire' (to make solid or join), which is where the L comes from.  Both
variations of English agree on the silent b in plumber/plumbing though...

You can understand why the latin word didn't become "solidering" in English, that's pretty awkward!
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: CrossRoads on Sep 17, 2020, 03:18 pm
Ah, didn't realize a "long o" vs a "short o" was used on the different sides of the pond (or whatever that might be called).


Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 17, 2020, 03:55 pm
Interesting
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: refriedwhiskey on Sep 17, 2020, 04:23 pm
Most people use needle nose pliers to insert the
resistors so they don't have that problem.
It all about using the proper tool.
I don't see the harm in injecting a bit of humor.
Maybe you shouldn't be so sensitive.

https://youtu.be/BnbcTtMptkU (https://youtu.be/BnbcTtMptkU)
Is that directed at me? Were you joking before, during, or after your all-caps STILL NO PHOTOS post? :D
Title: Re: resistors with spaghetti legs
Post by: raschemmel on Sep 17, 2020, 08:21 pm
Have posted a photo of the 'spaghetti legs" ?
Yes or no ?