Arduino Forum

Community => Bar Sport => Topic started by: bld on Feb 11, 2012, 11:19 am

Title: Your latest purchase
Post by: bld on Feb 11, 2012, 11:19 am
The old thread was close to 400 replies again, so here we are with a new one!

Just ordered a 4x20 LCD from adafruit, and a protoshield and bits for programming 328's

Old thread can be found here: http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php/topic,69933.0.html
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: mmcp42 on Feb 11, 2012, 11:20 am
is there a limit?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on Feb 11, 2012, 08:50 pm
I don't think so - look at some of the Spanish & Italian threads!

Iv'e got 3 sets of boards order on order:
More Mini-uino's
12 TPIC6B595 boards for a LED display project I am doing
'1284 DIP boards in Duemilanove style.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Feb 11, 2012, 09:38 pm
Gotta reply to keep with the in-crowd. I buy lots of things almost every day. Food usually.   ;)

Today I bought some alluminium strips (3x25mmx1m) for general mechanical construction.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on Feb 11, 2012, 09:58 pm
Bah, food - over rated!
Does keep the stomach from growling tho.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Feb 12, 2012, 01:36 am
I bought some beer and I am now going to go mess with some microwave transformers
(I kid I kid) just some crap at radio shack since I was actually near one today
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Feb 12, 2012, 01:47 am
I decided to buy some spare vacuum tubes for my Kenwood TS-520S ham radio transceiver (70s vintage, a beauty) before all the known NOS (New Old Stock) disappear from the planet. This, the driver tube, was the easy one to find. The final output tubes (a pair of 6146B or 6146W) are a little harder to find in tested NOS state and are of course more costly. The radio also uses several dual input mosfet transistors that can be difficult/impossible to find, but they don't wear out like the tubes do. This radio uses +700vdc for it's output finals, 100 watts of RF output to the antenna. Hams call that operating 'barefoot', as legal limit here in the states for most bands is 1,500 watts PEP output.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/250948734435?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

Lefty

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Valalvax on Feb 12, 2012, 03:10 am
I got:

AFX - FX-90 Helmet (Blue)

And TourMaster Quest pants

Waiting for my credit card to clear my available credit so I can buy the rainsuit and gloves and I'll have all my riding gear
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 12, 2012, 07:38 am
Today I found at Goodwill (50 percent off day, too!):

1. 6 X-10 wireless camera modules (one with pan/tilt unit), plus assorted other X-10 goodies (two firecrackers, and a PIR sensor)
2. A CueCat (I don't hoard real cats - only CueCats)
3. An old 8 and 16 mm movie splicer device (I have some old 8mm films that I might do something with someday)

Plus I got in the mail via Ebay a tripod and dart belt for my Nerf EBF-25 Vulcan (which I also found at Goodwill for $3.00 a couple of weeks ago); it works fine - I plan on getting a few more belts, more darts, and maybe mod it to shoot farther/faster...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Feb 12, 2012, 08:07 am
Quote
I plan on getting a few more belts, more darts, and maybe mod it to shoot farther/faster...


LOL, I first read that as "more darts to shot mods faster/farther". Our forum mods here aren't ALL bad, they just have a nasty job.  ;)

Lefty

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Feb 12, 2012, 08:25 am
Quote
Today I found at Goodwill (50 percent off day, too!):


yea if I were to report my goodwill findings it would be 47 George Foreman grills and some crappy clock radios for durn new prices... I hate our goodwills

I have better luck at the Habitat for Humanity store, which normally doesnt carry anything else but building supplies, but I snagged a Imagewriter II, TI99 joysticks (man they suck but like new for 25 cents) and a TRS model 100 ... bag (sigh no computer)

anyone want a pair of practically brand new TI994A joysticks? they use closed cell foam for springs and plastic membrane switches, its much squishier than it sounds
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Feb 12, 2012, 07:33 pm
Quote
yea if I were to report my goodwill findings it would be 47 George Foreman grills and some crappy clock radios for durn new prices... I hate our goodwills


Yea, I have kind of a love/hate relationship with Goodwill stores. About 15 years ago I spend a lot of time searching for those high quality brands and models of vintage 70s hi-fi stereo equipment and LP records. Seemed at the time a lot of people were replacing their top of the line 70s stereo stuff with the then new black plastic 5 channel crap systems. I would keep the best for myself and flip the rest on E-bay, usually at a X10 mark-up as those things are actively collected and treasured by many. Now mostly I would go in and there wouldn't be a thing so I would check out the 50 cent LP record albums. I stopped actively shopping there as the 70s stuff soon dried up as more and more people learned of the value of the better brands and models made in the 70s. Now maybe once a month at only the local store, maybe.

IF I NEVER SEEN ANOTHER HERB ALBERT AND THE TEQUANA BRASS BAND ALBUM, I WILL DIE A HAPPY MAN.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: mmcp42 on Feb 12, 2012, 08:54 pm
hee hee I have one if you want it!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on Feb 12, 2012, 10:16 pm
How about Sergio Mendes & Brazil 66?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Feb 12, 2012, 11:04 pm

IF I NEVER SEEN ANOTHER HERB ALBERT AND THE TEQUANA BRASS BAND ALBUM, I WILL DIE A HAPPY MAN.


You don't like whipped cream? The Dating Game? Mazda's Great Little Car?

I haven't bought any electronics stuff lately, but I did get a pair of roller skates at Goodwill, to use the bearings in a ball mill. Might be an arduino in that project at some point. Generally, I avoid Goodwill though.

I do have several boxes of old LPs I got at thrift stores and garage sales. Don't know yet what gems await me there -- perhaps some Herb. I did find an original Singing Nun in one of the ones I've looked through.  :smiley-mr-green:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on Feb 12, 2012, 11:17 pm
Great! So rip that into a joint-stereo at 256K sampling rate and post it for us 8)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Feb 12, 2012, 11:57 pm

Great! So rip that into a joint-stereo at 256K sampling rate and post it for us 8)


If you mean Dominique, well, it's a monaural recording, and my Dual is out of service anyway. But I'm sure you can find it on YouTube.  :smiley-eek:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 13, 2012, 12:49 am
Yea, I have kind of a love/hate relationship with Goodwill stores. About 15 years ago I spend a lot of time searching for those high quality brands and models of vintage 70s hi-fi stereo equipment and LP records.


I guess maybe the Goodwills here in the Phoenix area are just better (now if only we could fix our daft state legislature and county sheriff, things would be perfect).

Rarely do I go into a Goodwill and leave empty handed (to the chagrin of my wife); the find of the X-10 cameras was unexpected - they were all in a plastic tub they were shelf-stocking from. I saw them, pulled out one bag after another (each bagged separately), and decided on the whole lot. Some other guy came up to me and handed me some more (which was weird - he was a customer, too).

I've found strange computers (media-box type machines, and once a small embedded PC board custom-made BSD firewall), as well as built my Playstation 2 system from Goodwill castoffs (which I hardly play!). Recently I got a complete GameCube system set up (our Goodwills seem to be great places for older gaming systems).

Tons of great toy RC cars to be had (I once found an MGA Tarantula for $25.00); I also find many Robosapians and other Wowee 'bots. On occasion you can even run across some good vintage 70's audio gear (I found a real nice 1970's AKAI turntable for my component stereo at Goodwill about a year or so ago); I've recently seen a few 1/4" reel-to-reel players that were in decent shape (I already have my dad's, and don't need another).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on Feb 13, 2012, 12:54 am
@justjed, I was actually Sally Fields, The Flying Nun, but Dominique is much better. I think I may actually have copy already, have to check my hard drive o'music that I udpate my Neuros Audio MP3 player with occasionally.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 13, 2012, 03:10 am
Second-hand Rubidium Frequency Standard:

(http://gammon.com.au/images/Rubidium_Frequency_Standard2.jpg)

Cost: $80 on eBay.

Measured:

(http://gammon.com.au/images/Rubidium_Frequency_Standard1.jpg)

As described by Dave Jones:

http://www.eevblog.com/2012/01/14/eevblog-235-rubidium-frequency-standard/
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 13, 2012, 03:29 am
Oh yes, and this came in the parcel, strangely enough:

(http://gammon.com.au/images/Rubidium_Frequency_Standard3.jpg)

A small bear and a 7805 voltage regulator.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: mmcp42 on Feb 13, 2012, 05:50 pm
your frequency meter looks pretty accurate too
so how do you tell if the frequency meter or the frequency standard is off?
or do you assume the standard is good and adjust the meter?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Feb 13, 2012, 06:01 pm

your frequency meter looks pretty accurate too
so how do you tell if the frequency meter or the frequency standard is off?
or do you assume the standard is good and adjust the meter?


Yes, any calibration/validation procedure is based on some 'standard' or 'reference' you have avalible to you. The better the standard the more accurate your procedure will be. The old rule of thumb is that your standards or references need to be 10 times the accuracy specification of the thing you are attempting to calibrate.

Of all the electrical measurements possible, frequency is the one that has the best standards and accuracy avalible. That Rubidium Frequency Standard requires no adjustment, it's based on a fixed property of the wavelength of Rubidium, thus making it a very desirable frequency standard.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 13, 2012, 06:07 pm

Oh yes, and this came in the parcel, strangely enough:

(http://gammon.com.au/images/Rubidium_Frequency_Standard3.jpg)

A small bear and a 7805 voltage regulator.


Offering alternatives on ways to cope with unregulated power?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 13, 2012, 09:16 pm

your frequency meter looks pretty accurate too
so how do you tell if the frequency meter or the frequency standard is off?


Well this was interesting. I put the output from my signal generator (also nominally 10 MHz if required) into the same counter, and it gave the same results (10000.046). That's nice, I thought, my signal generator is correct. But putting both signals into the scope it was obvious they weren't the same frequency at all. In fact, compared to the Rubidium standard the signal generator kept changing (speeding up, I think), no doubt as it warmed up.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: borref on Feb 13, 2012, 11:19 pm
Quote
That's nice, I thought, my signal generator is correct ...

I was impressed by your frequency meter with three decimals precision. Putting it to test and finding it is less precise than expected kind of ruins your day.   :smiley-slim:

The saying, "A man with one clock knows what time it is. A man with two clocks is never sure." seems to apply here as well.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 13, 2012, 11:39 pm
Well that clearly demonstrate the difference between precision and accuracy.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Feb 14, 2012, 02:35 am

Well that clearly demonstrate the difference between precision and accuracy.


I spent a career with instrumentation. Accuracy is one of the most misunderstood, misused, and abused word in the world of electronics. Never trust a salesman or his spec sheets. Never accept an accuracy figure or specification without knowing and asking a whole lot of questions about how they are arriving at their specification and under what conditions.

It's a very interesting field, measurements and standards, but far from as simple as one might first think.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Feb 15, 2012, 03:24 pm
I got a 1m blue led strip for 1$ free shipping off ebay, buyitnow price 10$ XD
Waiting g for the day I get that 5m rgb strip with ir control for 1$ instead of 20
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 15, 2012, 05:50 pm

Oh yes, and this came in the parcel, strangely enough:

(http://gammon.com.au/images/Rubidium_Frequency_Standard3.jpg)

A small bear and a 7805 voltage regulator.


Was it a chinese supplier? They almost always seem to throw in wacky "extras"... ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 15, 2012, 08:39 pm

Was it a chinese supplier?


Yes.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Feb 17, 2012, 04:06 am
My order from Futurlec (California) arrived from China, 12 days transit not the 7-10 quoted. Somehow I got the 256k-bit serial rams as surface mount chips though the 64k-bitters are DIPs.

It's time for me to play with SPI so expect maybe some stupid questions.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Feb 18, 2012, 05:41 am
100 ATMEGA328P-PU from mouser.com These will hopefully last through the summer :)Their 25 point break has got about 1% increase from my last purchase. Digi-key ran out of them.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Feb 18, 2012, 06:17 am
do tell what do you do with 100 328's that will only last you through the summer? Since 2009 I have only used 2 hehe (and 3 168's and a handful of tinys)

oh and I hope you enjoy your 5 inch thick mouser catalog(s) soon to come ... they make good monitor stands

nothing really against mouser, but when you pay 1% more for 100 and you get a freaking phone book a week later you start to wonder if that 1% could have been shaved by not mailing a brick that has a 98% chance of instantly ending up in the dumpster (and its much more insulting when you buy a 1.50$ + shipping that really should have cost 2 dollars shipped sans doorstop)

edit:
against mouser I hate their search
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Feb 18, 2012, 06:27 am
Osgeld,

I have designed a family of serial LCD panels and backpacks with ATMEGA328P. I'm flashing them with my code and selling them in kits. My first 25 ATMEGA328P lasted 3 months, next 25 lasted 3 months. Not to use linear regression but just common sense, this 100 will last 8 months or less, the end of summer.

I wouldn't mind a catalog though. I find catalogs very useful in getting a feeling of what each part looks like. I can also take notes on the catalog. One is enough.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: bld on Feb 18, 2012, 06:12 pm
2x Nema17 stepper motors with 26:1 planetary gearbox on
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7052/6896019541_b09b8d0fae_z.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: bld on Feb 19, 2012, 03:18 pm
2x N.O. temperature switches, closes at 35c
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 21, 2012, 07:41 pm
Just over four hundred one half watt .4 ohm resistors -- a dollar including shipping (no, I don't have an actual plan for em)
Twenty TIP41C and a hundred 5.1v zeners -- four dollars shipped
five three-watt warm white LED's, including constant current drivers -- Four bucks and change
USB ASP Programmer -- a dollar shipped
Twenty LM317T and ten ULN2003A -- Ten bucks shipped.

I hit a scratch ticket for twenty bucks and decided to do a bit of ebay bottom-feeding... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: bld on Feb 21, 2012, 09:23 pm
Crimp tool...

finally had enough of using pliers that never really worked anyways
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dannable on Feb 21, 2012, 09:48 pm
10 off VS838 infrared receivers for £4.13 delivered from eBay.

However, one doesn't work and the rest seem to pick up spurious noise! Not that that will be a major problem for my application(s).

Just ordered and eagerly awaiting another Duemilanove also from eBay - £12.89 delivered.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 21, 2012, 10:55 pm
Still waiting for my 3 el-cheapo mini-steppers (with gearboxes) and driver boards to find their way to me from China after being inspired by focalist and his sub-$100.00 CNC build...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 22, 2012, 12:56 am
That is indeed the drawback to the supercheap items from HK and such.. Patience is required.  Especially with my ebay bottom feeding, shipping can take a month at times. Happily components are small, a small filing cabinet holds all of my component hunting.

Just not been able to get some tinkering time in... amazing how I can via modern chemistry I can delay, but ultimately not avoid paying...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Feb 22, 2012, 02:14 am

That is indeed the drawback to the supercheap items from HK and such.. Patience is required.  Especially with my ebay bottom feeding, shipping can take a month at times. Happily components are small, a small filing cabinet holds all of my component hunting.

Just not been able to get some tinkering time in... amazing how I can via modern chemistry I can delay, but ultimately not avoid paying...


Maybe it's my west coast location, but I've never had any of my Asian E-bay bottom feeding purchases take more then 12 days, with 10-11 days most likely. Being retired has helped me slow down and enjoy the ride more so waiting for such bargains has not been a problem. I think one key is to have more then one project in the works so attention can be switched back and forth as parts procurement allows.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Feb 22, 2012, 02:38 am
Quote
Maybe it's my west coast location


And I agree with that statement. When I order from China , ( I did order from E-bay --> 7  X   MAX 7219 ), It mail from HK, take the plane and arrive in Vancouver, BC - In your case retrolefty, in LA or San Fransisco. After the plane trip via Vancouver, take a land trip across Canada going to Toronto, the "Border - Custom" in Mississauga, after that, ship to my PO box in Toronto - West - End. And I go get it... hopefully,  I don't pay GST - Fed tax or PST - prov tax or HST - both. That is the borders guys to decided to place taxes on the items arriving by mail.

Most of the time, I buy locally, or order from  Canadian e-stores.  My last order from HVW, USB mini, a servo motor and a RTC chip + Xtal, came very quick - order on Tuesday, arrive on Friday, same week... I was SURPRISE...  and my order from China ( 2 mini drill with a DC motor ) arrive at the same day - Friday - last week.   
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 22, 2012, 05:02 am
Interesting.  Since USPS and China post now provide tracking of most packages, I see the routes most of the time, at least as far as scans go.  To make it to the Boston area, most often it seems packages go through Chicago or Los Angeles, rather than a east-west direct route, even though the huge ports of the Eastern seaboard.

I frequently don't understand the business model of selling an item and taking a loss on the shipping... But I'm also enough of a pragmatist to be happy getting stuff on the cheap..
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Feb 22, 2012, 06:07 am

I frequently don't understand the business model of selling an item and taking a loss on the shipping... But I'm also enough of a pragmatist to be happy getting stuff on the cheap..


I too can't see how they are making any profit at all with including free shipment. All I can think of is that their government is subsidizing or reimbursing the shipping costs. Nothing else makes sense?

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Feb 22, 2012, 06:10 am
I order a 8 High bandwith transistors ( BFR90 ) from the UK. It took 2 week. I ask the cleck at my PO box office - at Shoppers, Most Eastern oversea mail goes to Montreal and take the road throught the 401 < - Canada's busiest Highway. And off course going to the Post Office Custom in Mississauga <-- West of Toronto.  A bit more quicker than from Vancouver. I don't know about the US mail setup.  That was nice to know about the Canadian mail system - Canada Post.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Feb 22, 2012, 11:46 am
My Futurlec order came from China in 12 days. I'm not on the East Coast USA but not so far it makes a real difference.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 22, 2012, 12:01 pm

I too can't see how they are making any profit at all with including free shipment.


Didn't someone say recently, that on eBay you can get the exact same thing at two price points:

* More expensive, but "free shipping"
* Cheaper, but you pay for shipping

Perhaps that's how it works. Although I have got some stuff recently that seems cheap either way.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 22, 2012, 01:41 pm
The thing is, I make a habit of grabbing the bottom of the bottom of the barrel.  I can see how a vendor might sell a one-off at a loss to get rid of it, or a new vendor making a mistake on how to list.. and learning a lesson via losing a little money on shipping.

The bottom of the barrel often is a loss even on the item itself, much less the shipping-- and yet vendors place the items up and sell them again and again.  A good example is a hundred 5.1v zeners for a dollar including shipping.. I don't see the diodes actually having a cost to the distributor of less than a penny each- so it equates to a loss on both the product and the shipping.

There has to be some kind of subsidy or kickback from their government (market dominance thing maybe?) for these prices to be true-- and they are.  Vendors like marcmart or kuuco (among others) regularly HAVE to be losing money otherwise.. and they have been around a couple of years- unlikely if actually operating at a loss... of course, it is possible that these items are a loss leader, to get folks like mentioning their names, like I just did.. in which case, it's very cheap as a form of advertising.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Feb 22, 2012, 04:25 pm
Maybe they are hoping for large amounts of business, or there is some sort of joint shipping company that everyone uses that is cheap, or government run and free
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 22, 2012, 05:49 pm
My motors/drivers arrived yesterday - they are a lot smaller than what I imagined; now I am trying to think up how I will make the CNC frame (thinking Micro-Ax - that, or 1 inch 80/20)...anyway, it's a future project.

Last night, I ordered some more darts/belts for my Nerf Vulcan, 200 plastic gears from another Chinese supplier, and a copy of Mondo 2000 issue #16...

:)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Feb 22, 2012, 07:35 pm
Give me a link to "USB ASP Programmer -- a dollar shipped" Master El-cheapo! Is it a USB ISP programmer? I really want one.

Parts in China are quite cheap to start with. Then if you are in ShenZhen, a boom town next to Hongkong, you walk your packages to Hongkong post. The free port ships cheaply. It's the USPS or UPS etc that charge too much for shipping. They need to pay tax too since entire US is not a tax free country. See this:

https://secure.dipmicro.com/store/TACT3

They get their parts mostly from China, where all of these parts are cranked out at amazing speed and quantity.

This one on the other hand:

http://www.sparkfun.com/products/97

Must have been made by Chinese royalty or coated with thick gold $). If all you see here is SPE type of price, then ebay is a shocking experience. I do think the ebayers make money, even when they sell 100 of something for $1 including shipping. The Chinese has an old saying about selling with little profit to make more sales. There is also a huge salary difference. You have to double the price in the US to cover basic costs, salary to be the lion's share. Over there, a $600/month salary is not too bad for a college student just starting out. You can hire someone that reads and writes English to post/sell on ebay. Over here, you need maybe $3,000 to find someone with a high school degree.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Feb 22, 2012, 07:38 pm
I got a usbisp for like 6$, couldn't find cheaper than that, you musta got lucky on a bid lol
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 22, 2012, 09:07 pm

This one on the other hand:

http://www.sparkfun.com/products/97


The thing I like about SparkFun, though (being that I live in Arizona) - is that it's a hop/skip away; if they have a part that I can't get locally (or don't already have) - and I need it quick (and/or "new"), then SparkFun is fast - I can generally order on a Wednesday morning and get it by Friday. The only thing faster is surplus from Electronic Goldmine (just across the valley - unfortunately, they don't have a walk-in store!). Of course, I do most of my shopping at Apache Reclamation, Goodwill, and Fry's Electronics - and I have a large stock of junk, so I rarely need to shop for things, and don't mind waiting on stuff from China in most cases...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Feb 23, 2012, 12:02 am
You don't have digi-key in your backyard like I do (2-4 hours away is back yardish for shipping).  XD
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 23, 2012, 03:27 am
http://www.ebay.com/itm/300663960094?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_1748wt_922 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/300663960094?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_1748wt_922)

Generic USB ISP programmer... A buck shipped.

Now the thing is, hunting for this type of deal takes time, and you have to be willing to put things away for when you need them, not buy them when you need them.  Bottom feeding really leaves you at the mercy of the supplier, who may not consider the loss leader their highest priority.. Though I almost never get screwed over..

You have to remember sometimes I have to kill hours at a time in the middle of the night, best with some kind of mindless thing.  If I save five bucks on parts, but it has taken three hours to get there in terms of searches and bids, its not really practical.. Especially since the volumes you buy are hobbyist levels at best.. It's a one off or a promo to get a deal like that...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Feb 23, 2012, 04:39 am
Thanks! The list of processors has no 328 so is it working with 328? Thanks!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Feb 23, 2012, 08:18 am
MacOSX "Lion."
None of my old PPC apps work now :-(
Does anyone know of a reasonably priced draw/paint package that will read Corel Photopaint 11 .cpt files?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 23, 2012, 12:36 pm
I'll find out when it arrives in a few weeks.. but since it does list 168's, I can't imagine that it would have a problem with ATMEGA328. hadn't even noticed that it wasn't on the list.  It's ISP, so I would imagine if it fits the specifications for one, it would fit for all.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Feb 24, 2012, 10:17 am
Canon a3000 to run chdk...
Pink pogo plug.  Will it talk to an Arduino?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: ekaki on Feb 25, 2012, 05:14 am
A Lada Niva, to charge a big dry batt driving by an Arduino.

Note; the Niva will be drive by me 'cause it's too simple for Ardiuno...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Feb 25, 2012, 07:18 am
What's a lady niva?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 25, 2012, 07:56 am
I didn't want to ask that, to be honest ...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 25, 2012, 08:44 am
Looks like its a car:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lada_Niva

You know, a russian "Lada" - one of the biggest POS cars this side of a Yugo; to be honest, I don't really know that for sure; in fact, I would say that every car has a bad reputation, and just the other week I saw a nice Yugo putting down the street - shocked me to see it, TBH - but no smoke, no strange noises, and it looked to be in great condition.

Lada's are probably the same. They just likely have a "bad reputation" because they are a mass-production on-the-cheap get-me-from-point-a-to-b kind of car. Nothing to impress people with, just does the job. You know - what a sane person drives (instead of something to impress others with for one reason or another).

Then again, they might really be POS...

:D

EDIT: Hmm - looking at the wiki article again, it looks like this Lada is a better vehicle than your "standard" Lada - off road capability, 4WD - heck, now I want one (that and a Unimog); it looks to be quite fun! :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wortelsoft on Feb 25, 2012, 10:09 am
A Lada Niva is a no frills 4x4 as you found out. Very low tech but they can be a lot of fun.
And Mercede Unimog that's a whole different league, I think they are the best "off the shelf" offroad vehicle available. I want one as well since I was a kid.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Feb 25, 2012, 10:16 am

THIS is a no-frills 4x4...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subaru_BRAT

That Lada Niva is a Cadillac by comparison.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Feb 26, 2012, 12:01 am
Transformers the complete series. Got a deal on this $99 series:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/DVD/Transformers-More-Than-Meets-Eye-Comp-Series/e/826663125368?r=1&cm_mmca2=pla&cm_mmc=GooglePLA-_-DVD-_-Q000000633-_-826663125368

$49 :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 26, 2012, 12:56 am

Transformers the complete series. Got a deal on this $99 series:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/DVD/Transformers-More-Than-Meets-Eye-Comp-Series/e/826663125368?r=1&cm_mmca2=pla&cm_mmc=GooglePLA-_-DVD-_-Q000000633-_-826663125368

$49 :)


Howdja pull that off?! Nice set, though! I want that kind of deal on the GI Joe complete set (at $150.00, I can't see myself spending that kind of money on cartoons from my youth)...

:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on Feb 26, 2012, 03:20 am
1 full reel (5000 pcs) of 1k 0603 resistors - ebay of course. I don't know if I will use all of them during my lifetime, but it was almost cheaper than getting 100 pcs locally.

Speaking of ebay and electronic components...

The same seller also has 100nF ceramic capacitors of the kind I use in my projects, only the date-code on the reel is something like 1993. I figured that old age doesn't matter with resistors, but what about ceramic caps? I certainly wouldn't buy electrolytic caps that are from the last century.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Feb 26, 2012, 04:36 am
I've upgraded my Canon IXUS 75, (sniff, damaged the CCD!) to a Canon PowerShot SX150 IS, AUS$208 @Dick Smith.
Got CHDK up and running, shot this last night.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a0JaaxLiAEY

HD Movie mode is pretty damn good!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zT4YWmh2LKs

As for the Lada Niva, OMFG!

I'll scan some photo's of what was left of the gearbox, transfer case of a Niva I had to rebuild.
What a POS, right up there with Zetor tractors!
From a country where every thing looks like it was made in the "Glorious Red Tractor Factor" it was all so flimsy.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Feb 26, 2012, 04:38 am


Transformers the complete series. Got a deal on this $99 series:

http://video.barnesandnoble.com/DVD/Transformers-More-Than-Meets-Eye-Comp-Series/e/826663125368?r=1&cm_mmca2=pla&cm_mmc=GooglePLA-_-DVD-_-Q000000633-_-826663125368

$49 :)


Howdja pull that off?! Nice set, though! I want that kind of deal on the GI Joe complete set (at $150.00, I can't see myself spending that kind of money on cartoons from my youth)...

:D


Just a stroke of luck. I have had a BN $50 gift card since about 6 months ago, thanks to arduino (I was awarded best demonstration for a teaching apparatus I made with arduino). I've been trying to spend it for the past months with no luck. Nothing BN sells was worth my money. And last week I received a BN email as usual and it says select DVDs at up to 50% off. It didn't click but just a few days ago I realized I should look at their DVDs, and transformers were on sale at $49 and that was the last day of the sale. So I combined it with another BN gift card, which I got from entertaining 100 kids with physics for a whole day. Bingo! The sale is over now and I'm so happy to see the price back up again  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 27, 2012, 03:28 am
OCXO 131: 10 MHz frequency standard, as recommended by retrolefty:

(http://gammon.com.au/images/OCXO131.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Feb 27, 2012, 07:03 am
for once in like 3 years goodwill did not suck

I got a darn near new dell keyboard for the wife (though worth a buck I paid 3) and a 40 gig tivo, which I am in the process of tossing 500 or more gigs into, slapping debian on, and using it as a NAS

so for 10 bucks overall not bad ... worst case I can use the disk out of the tivo in my bench machine which is only running a ata33 20 gig laptop drive ATM
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 29, 2012, 04:50 am
Hey, I have no experience with them, but this looks like a dang good deal.. Looks like the one I ordered, I would assume they are basically the same...  USB ISP programmer for four bucks shipped.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/USBASP-USBISP-AVR-Programmer-USB-ATMEGA8-ATMEGA128-New-/370532286436?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item564571ffe4#ht_3747wt_689  (http://www.ebay.com/itm/USBASP-USBISP-AVR-Programmer-USB-ATMEGA8-ATMEGA128-New-/370532286436?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item564571ffe4#ht_3747wt_689)

Here's something else interesting, worth the price for wall wart and parts.. I got a couple... Two VOIP routers for a buck, delivered...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/260962981308?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_500wt_689  (http://www.ebay.com/itm/260962981308?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_500wt_689)




Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Feb 29, 2012, 05:18 am
From LittleBird -

Pololu Dual VNH5019 Motor Driver Shield for Arduino
Video Experimenter Kit
Seeeduino Mega
EM-406 Connector Breakout
LiPo Charger Basic
Polymer Lithium Ion Battery - 1000mAh 7.4v x 2
Arduino Stackable Header Kit x 4
4-Digit 7-Segment Display - Red
Infrared LED - 850nm - 25pcs
N-Channel MOSFET 60V 30A x 3
JST RCY Connector - Male/Female Set (2-pin) x 3
2-Pin Female JST XH-Style Cable (15cm) x 5
T Connector Male-Female Pair x 6
Toggle Switch: 3-Pin, SPDT, 5A x 3
Mini Push Button Switch - Tall x 30
Super Light 3.7g Micro Servo (RC plane helicopter Boat)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Feb 29, 2012, 05:25 am
Now I don't understand. A couple of boxes will cost money to ship so why $1 for two and free shipping?! Is the seller going to sell your email and shipping address?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 29, 2012, 05:37 am
In the several years I have been doing this, I haven't noticed much change in junk mail..  I don't get it either, but I am pragmatic enough to get me some.  Those are set prices too, not lowball auction bids.

Maybe new version coming out, get a couple bux before worth nothing?  still, it's a LOSS.. I dunno.  I just don't get it, but the packages keep coming anyway..
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 29, 2012, 05:42 am
99 cents for a router? Plus this:

Quote
$5 back and 6 mos to pay on 1st purchase


Should be able to come out ahead 4 bucks.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 29, 2012, 05:54 am
Okay, this may be the best one yet:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/110832814454?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_2471wt_689  (http://www.ebay.com/itm/110832814454?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_2471wt_689)

I have gotten five of these now from different vendors, they toss them out as a loss leader I think to get stars and feedback.  Maybe that's the angle?

That is my purchase, and yes, that is correct.  Serial to TTL module, delivered to my doorstep, from halfway across the freaking planet.  for.. Ready....? 

SIX CENTS.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 29, 2012, 05:57 am
You missed this:

Code: [Select]
MAX232 RS232 To TTL 5V Converter/Adapter...
$0.01
Free shipping


One cent. Free shipping.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Feb 29, 2012, 06:16 am
Yes but is that the final sale price or just
a starting price?  the six center was the actual price I paid :-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Feb 29, 2012, 06:28 am
Oh yeah, oops. I hoped you wouldn't notice that. :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Feb 29, 2012, 06:39 am
that one might just be overstock, in mass there's probably 10 cents worth of parts on it, and if you have 100 boards rotting away for something no one really uses ....

slash them!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Feb 29, 2012, 06:43 am
I recently bid on and won a Forte VFX-1 HMD (with puck and EISA interface board) on Ebay - not that I really needed one (although my other one doesn't have the interface board); I just couldn't pass up the deal.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on Feb 29, 2012, 04:06 pm
1x adjustable (2.5-9.0V) boost converter from pololu
1x active IR reflex sensor from pololu as well

The boost converter is just about 20x10mm and can provide several 100 mA, even if powered from 2 quite flat AA cells - and it doesn't get hot at all. That is perfect for completely draining otherwise useless batteries. The IR sensor can be used to detect objects behind a thin sheet of acrylic (IR transmission of that material is rather good).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Mar 01, 2012, 10:40 pm

From LittleBird -

Pololu Dual VNH5019 Motor Driver Shield for Arduino
Video Experimenter Kit
Seeeduino Mega
EM-406 Connector Breakout
LiPo Charger Basic
Polymer Lithium Ion Battery - 1000mAh 7.4v x 2
Arduino Stackable Header Kit x 4
4-Digit 7-Segment Display - Red
Infrared LED - 850nm - 25pcs
N-Channel MOSFET 60V 30A x 3
JST RCY Connector - Male/Female Set (2-pin) x 3
2-Pin Female JST XH-Style Cable (15cm) x 5
T Connector Male-Female Pair x 6
Toggle Switch: 3-Pin, SPDT, 5A x 3
Mini Push Button Switch - Tall x 30
Super Light 3.7g Micro Servo (RC plane helicopter Boat)



Trying to build a vehicle that drives itself with GPS?  :smiley-roll:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Mar 01, 2012, 10:55 pm
Quote
Trying to build a vehicle that drives itself with GPS?  smiley-roll

and sonar, laser scanner thingo I've been messing with.

Don't worry I'll put the "good/evil" switch in a place where it's sure to get accidently switched over!

All hail our glorious robotic overlords!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Mar 01, 2012, 11:39 pm
MIC841HBC5 comparator with built in adjustable hysterisis from arrow, only place I found
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Mar 02, 2012, 12:28 am

Quote
Trying to build a vehicle that drives itself with GPS?  smiley-roll

and sonar, laser scanner thingo I've been messing with.

Don't worry I'll put the "good/evil" switch in a place where it's sure to get accidently switched over!

All hail our glorious robotic overlords!



Red planet has stolen your good/evil idea with their robot AMEE. In fact, if you add a rail gun on your platform and have it chase your dog or wild animals, that would be wonderful.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 02, 2012, 12:40 am
Hi guys;

Last week-end, I found ( by luck ) an another surplus electronic store in Toronto. I ask if the owner  have a web site, and he say no. That in that case I will provide the address of that store and I did took two pictures with my cell phone. The store speciallize in instruments and measuments electronic equipments. Like scope, freq gen, DVM, etc... My type of "candy" store  :smiley-mr-green:

So for the members in the Greater Toronto Area, the store is located south-east of Lawrence Ave West & Keele Street.

Here the address :    Electronics Surplus Industries limited
                            53 Sheffield Street
                            Toronto, Ontario
                            M6M 3E5  
                            Canada
                            tel : 416-240-1950 Fax : 416-240-1970
                             Tuesday to Saturday 11AM to 5:30 PM  Sat to 4 PM.

Here the pictures.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Mar 02, 2012, 12:55 am
Nice! Lots of oscilloscopes!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 02, 2012, 03:54 am
The Vonage routers came... I paid something like a dollar fifty for FOUR.

The board itself is all SMD, not sure of the hackability.  That being said, the case is a nice little project box, and it comes with a meter long cat five patch cable.  Possibly the most valuable part is the wall wart.. It's a switching power supply, 12v @ 1.5A.. Never have too many of those!

It was shipped FEDEX for free.  I just don't get it...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Mar 02, 2012, 04:19 am

The Vonage routers came... I paid something like a dollar fifty for FOUR.

The board itself is all SMD, not sure of the hackability.  That being said, the case is a nice little project box, and it comes with a meter long cat five patch cable.  Possibly the most valuable part is the wall wart.. It's a switching power supply, 12v @ 1.5A.. Never have too many of those!

It was shipped FEDEX for free.  I just don't get it...


Cool. Heck, the Cat-5 cables alone aren't a bad deal at that price. And I'm used to cheap Cat-5 cables because I usually make my own.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Mar 02, 2012, 04:56 am
Windows 8.  (ok, it was free.  Arduino appears to work, at least as far as a compile...)

The pogoPlug also arrived; a bit bigger than I thought.  But perhaps more straightforward to hack, too...
Looks like a lot of computer for less than $30...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: mmcp42 on Mar 03, 2012, 09:57 am
4 by 2.3" 7 segment LED display
it is HUUUUGE
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 03, 2012, 04:35 pm

Last week-end, I found ( by luck ) an another surplus electronic store in Toronto.


Nice! I guess now I have a place to visit should I ever find myself in Toronto. Those pictures remind me of how Apache Reclamation (as well as Equipment Exchange) look here in Phoenix; how many square-meters (or feet?) were under roof?

That said, I'm probably hitting Apache Reclamation and some Goodwills later today (got paid - can you tell?); yesterday my HMD (Forte VFX-1) came in the mail. Everything was included except a driver floppy (for DOS); some searching and some help from some people on the internet allowed me to find that and a whole host of other extras for it. My plan is to make a "retro" VR gaming rig with it, at some point (some TLC is needed for the HMD; the removable foam padding is falling apart, and I'll need to craft a new one to make it usable.

:)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 03, 2012, 07:45 pm
@cr0sh

The store have 6000 sq. ft.  Lots of goodies for any type of projects. And if some of the GTA forums members need a cheap scope and a freq gen, that might be the place to buy it. I still don't know how much, but I will find that out.

I like surplus stores...  :D

PS: This post is my 1000 !!! <-- Edison Member !!! yeah !!1  :D 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: sth77 on Mar 03, 2012, 09:02 pm
I bought a digital storage oscilloscope UTD2042C with 40 MHz. First measurements on some DCF77-modules, just to look why they don't get the signal.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKtacJdXn1Y&feature=player_embedded
Here is a short video of it - a lot of peaks when my monitor is on, a really good signal when the monitor is off...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 04, 2012, 06:57 am
@sth77

Look nice. How much was that scope ?  Most digital storage scope are very expensive. I bought mine, an analog 25 MHz scope for 120.00 ca, used of course, at Active Surplus.

Here a picture.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Mar 04, 2012, 07:31 am
My wife needed to go to Joann's (http://www.joann.com) , meanwhile while looking at various things, I noticed in the section where they sell beads, charms and that sort of stuff they had some single layer, divided plastic organizers, for average prices but!

I found a pile of ~10x7 with 18 sections, that were reduced to 1.99$ AND 20% off ... so for a 1.60$ (ish) I snagged a few
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: sth77 on Mar 04, 2012, 11:18 am

How much was that scope ?  Most digital storage scope are very expensive. I bought mine, an analog 25 MHz scope for 120.00 ca, used of course, at Active Surplus.


289 Euro, appr. 380 Canadian Dollar. It is my first scope and really easy to use, but there are some negative points. It is not as quiet as I wished, the fan is a little bit too loud. Also the resolution of the screen could be better, the displays of tablet pc and mobile phones have a lot more dpi. But I knew it before I bought the scope, still think it is a fair price.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 04, 2012, 06:49 pm
@sth77

289 euro... It better be worth it.

Quote
It is not as quiet as I wished, the fan is a little bit too loud.


Fan running loud ?  My PC fan is loud...I can fall asleep with that noise    :smiley-sleep:

@Osgeld

Good deal to find organizers. In this hobby, always need organizers.


Here what I bought last week-end.

From Active Tech Electronics  - http://www.active123.com (http://www.active123.com)
Male to Female jumpers wires
Female to Female jumpers wires
0.1 uF cap - 75
Opto-coupler chips
MOC3012 - 5
MOC3010M - 5
ILQ1 - 1
TIL116 - 5
6N135 -2
6N136 -2
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 04, 2012, 07:10 pm
Will female jumper ends fit good on socket pins?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 04, 2012, 07:21 pm
@GoForSmoke

The Female to Female are designed for male headers pins. And the Female to Male are designed for male ans female headers pins. Nice for breadboarding and board to board connections. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 05, 2012, 01:29 am
I know what they're made for. I asked if they would work on socket pins.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 05, 2012, 03:11 am
I don't want to offend you.  If you mean socket pins like headers female pins, I guess yes.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 05, 2012, 07:23 am
Like extra 24-pin chip sockets "because they was cheap". While header pins are too thick to fit into the machined sockets I have, my jumper wires do fit just fine and the sockets do fit in each other. Breadboard will take header pins but these sockets won't. So I just find female to my jumper wires and I'm set.



Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 05, 2012, 05:53 pm
The USB ASP programmer arrived today, kudos to the seller.  Six cents for the sucker including shipping from China... Sheesh!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 06, 2012, 05:33 am
This topic has been moved to Project Guidance (http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?board=3).

http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?topic=95299.0
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: takao21106 on Mar 06, 2012, 06:19 am
Arduino LCDs, actually, 1.8" TFT color displays,
I only ordered the displays the vendor was so generous shipping them already mounted
on 5v adapter PCBs.

But I have a 3.3 volts 18F PIC.

Today I unsoldered one, using lead solder, mounted it on a TQFP44 adapter PCB.
only two extra pins are needed.

Good value for less than $7.

On the PCB there is 3.3v regulator, diodes, and resistors, as well a micro SD card holder.

Next time I write a note, I want to use them for a 3.3 volts chip.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 11, 2012, 02:57 am
All, today I picked up one of these (GP-4303D) at my favorite electronics surplus dealer (Apache Reclamation and Electronics):

http://www.testequipmentdepot.com/ezdigital/digdcsupply.htm

It's a really nice power supply, and seems to work OK, but I was wanting a manual. Well, the above link has a manual in PDF format listed (under "datasheet"), which I downloaded, but upon viewing, my reader (Document Viewer 2.30.3 under Ubuntu 10.04 LTS) shows mostly blank pages (no text except on the front "cover").

Can someone who has a copy of Acrobat (under windows or mac) and Linux pull it up, verify that it isn't blank, save it back out and verify that it is viewable in Linux?

I note that Ghostscript (v8.71) - which I think Document Viewer uses (?) - seems to load the first page ok, but upon pressing return to go to the next page, it errors out.

I'd really like to view this manual... :(

NVM guys - I found a solution:

1. I went to google and used their online PDF viewer (https://docs.google.com/viewer) to view the link to the PDF
2. I then zoomed into the page to the maximum size, and downloaded each page as a PNG file
3. I then used ImageMagick (as shown here: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=789359) to convert the PNGs to a PDF

...et voila! A viewable PDF...

:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 11, 2012, 04:37 am
I resaved it here, this may or may not be more readable:

http://gammon.com.au/images/gp4303d_a_gp4185d_a.pdf
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 11, 2012, 04:55 am
@cr0sh

Nice find. How much was this PSU ?


Another payday, another trip to Sayal and Active Surplus.

Here at Active Surplus

4 - push-button  and a red push-button...hmm.. "Dare I push the button ?"  :smiley-mr-green:
2 - 3 A fuse <--- my DIY PSU just "when ..south"...  I think...  :smiley-roll:
4 - DIP Reed relay - SIGMA 191TE1A1-5S  <--- nice relay. Work at 5 V
1 - 630 point breadboard  < --- Always need breadboards
1 - 300 point breadboard  
1 - big TO-220 heatsink <-- for the power triac
1 - 3 X AA holder with on/off switch  <--- Use to power an breadboard Arduino and PICAXE

At Sayal

1 - bottle Ferric Chloride  <-- building the PCB's version
1 - TO-220 heatsink
LM339, 74LS14, 7805, 7809, 2N3904, 1N751, Q4008L4, DF01M, 2KBP04M, 3A fuse and Toroid Core <-- ferrite donut

And at Home Depot for some electricals parts like : Switch, Plug, Metal box, metal screws, marrettes, 16 G - 13 A 25 ' extention cord. <-- these parts are for my Arduino dimmer. It pass the 12 V ac test. The toroid is to test a Current Sensor. I have 2 AC light holder. And I already have a plywood at hand to build the AC testing setup.  

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 11, 2012, 06:28 am

I resaved it here, this may or may not be more readable:

http://gammon.com.au/images/gp4303d_a_gp4185d_a.pdf


That worked much better - thank you! :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 11, 2012, 06:30 am

Nice find. How much was this PSU ?


$95.00 USD; I thought it was a decent price...maybe?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Mar 11, 2012, 03:49 pm

Well, the above link has a manual in PDF format listed (under "datasheet"), which I downloaded, but upon viewing, my reader (Document Viewer 2.30.3 under Ubuntu 10.04 LTS) shows mostly blank pages (no text except on the front "cover").


The default PDF reader for the Gnome desktop is Evince (or it used to be -- I'm still at 9.10), which uses the poppler libararies. Used to be, you got either Xpdf or Ghostview, which used ghostscript, and I don't know whether either of those is even being maintained -- haven't seen them show up for a while.

I was able to open that datasheet directly in Evince -- version 2.28, so I find it odd that you had difficulty.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Mar 11, 2012, 05:39 pm
Found this CRC 808 valve (picture attached) at a flea market. The seller immediatly suggested 5 (DKK) as a price, and at that level I may buy stuff just because I think it looks pretty. He had 3, I bought all.

Now, what to do with it?
(a) Decorative use if I ever make some Steampunk device
(b) Actually use it as an amplifier (I am thinking of driving LEDs, 3 is just right for RGB)
(c) "Mod" it. I was tinking of somehow sawing off the bottom, and somehow attach LEDs inside.
(d) Resell on the web, as some people might pay real money

They will probably just lie somewhere accumulating dust.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 11, 2012, 05:56 pm


Nice find. How much was this PSU ?


$95.00 USD; I thought it was a decent price...maybe?


Hmm... Look a good deal...compare to the list of PSU from Active Components.

http://www.active123.com/prodList.asp?strSearch=Power+Supply&strSearchType=OR&strSearchMin=0&strSearchMax=0&strSearchCat=0&strSearchBrand=&strSearchManufacturer=&curPage=2&sortField=sku (http://www.active123.com/prodList.asp?strSearch=Power+Supply&strSearchType=OR&strSearchMin=0&strSearchMax=0&strSearchCat=0&strSearchBrand=&strSearchManufacturer=&curPage=2&sortField=sku)

I wonder why you did not make a PSU... You just need a beefy transformer ( 35 Vac @ 4 A  OR 30 Vac @ 3A ) , the rest make it using a LM317 with a by-pass Power transistor.  I did just that. I was lucky I found 2 30 Vac @ 3A transformer at Active Surplus in the mid 1990's. My PSU model is +/- 5 V and +/- 0-30 V , 3A max. I need to re-design, more protection, a better balance dual power line and a display monitor. I fry my display monitor board due to a short wires. Hey, it was a DIY board anyway.

The raison I want to build my own PSU is : Price..They are WAY too expensive.  A brand new beefy transformer is about $50 to $100. A surplus store may sell those transformer cheaper. 

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 11, 2012, 06:11 pm
@Msquare

Wow... Old tubes !!!  :smiley-eek:

I wonder how old they are. That design look like 1920's, maybe older. Man... almost 100 years. I wonder if they are still operational.

Quote

(a) Decorative use if I ever make some Steampunk device
(b) Actually use it as an amplifier


That I will do with them.

An old fashion amplifier is way retro and cool. Just need 2 transformers. Since you live in Europe, it will be : 220 -> 12 V <-- for the filaments, 12 V -> 220 V -> rectify - > filter -> power the tubes.

Here a link about a list of tubes datasheets. Look for 808. And clic the PDF link.

http://tubedata.tubes.se/sheets8.html (http://tubedata.tubes.se/sheets8.html)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Techone on Mar 11, 2012, 06:24 pm
@Msquare

I just check the datasheet. I download the 808 pdf file.

Very interesting...

My idea about the power the tube with 220 is... TOO low...  :smiley-eek:

12 V for filament is too high. The filament need 7.5 V @ 4 A

The DC plate voltage to be operated properly is... Are you seating ?

1250 V <----  :smiley-eek-blue:

The plate is the anode, the cathode is pin 1 or 4 ... I think...

Or go for a decorative with theses tubes.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 11, 2012, 06:25 pm
Yea, light the filament and call it a night light.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 11, 2012, 07:14 pm


Well, the above link has a manual in PDF format listed (under "datasheet"), which I downloaded, but upon viewing, my reader (Document Viewer 2.30.3 under Ubuntu 10.04 LTS) shows mostly blank pages (no text except on the front "cover").


The default PDF reader for the Gnome desktop is Evince (or it used to be -- I'm still at 9.10), which uses the poppler libararies. Used to be, you got either Xpdf or Ghostview, which used ghostscript, and I don't know whether either of those is even being maintained -- haven't seen them show up for a while.

I was able to open that datasheet directly in Evince -- version 2.28, so I find it odd that you had difficulty.


I just fired up evince from the command line, and got the following when trying to open the PDF:

Code: [Select]
andrew@buster:~$ evince
Error: Bad annotation destination
Error: Missing language pack for 'Adobe-Korea1' mapping
Error: Unknown font tag 'TT2'
Error (179): No font in show
Error (221): No font in show
Error (277): No font in show
...


(there was actually a ton of similar error code, but I clipped it out of the above)

This led me down a path to looking in synaptic for "korea" and "adobe-korea" and installing a few pieces (some fonts, and a poppler mapping based on your insights); once that was in place, I could see things fine (at the cost of about 40 Mb of extra disk space in the end).

:)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 11, 2012, 07:32 pm

Hmm... Look a good deal...compare to the list of PSU from Active Components.


Yeah - I guess the closest match would be to this one:

http://www.active123.com/1627A-0-To-30V-0-To-3A-Digital-Display-Dc-Power-Supply-Prodview.html

So I guess my deal was good (I tried to get 'em to come down by offering $75.00, but they wouldn't budge); even the original link I posted had the price for that PSU at $180.00 (new, I guess), so my deal was still good (half price for surplus).

I wonder why you did not make a PSU... You just need a beefy transformer ( 35 Vac @ 4 A  OR 30 Vac @ 3A ) , the rest make it using a LM317 with a by-pass Power transistor.


A few reasons, mainly; while I probably have all the parts needed:

1) My power supply design skills are fairly lacking
2) I want and need adjustable voltage and over-current protection
3) I have job that pays me well to supply my habits ;)

Really, it's #2 that's the killer for a homemade design; I've looked into how you design a PSU with adjustable current and voltage, and it isn't as easy as one would think. I don't have the time to play around in that area of design - but I do have some disposable cash at hand, and when I find a deal, I grab it.


I did just that. I was lucky I found 2 30 Vac @ 3A transformer at Active Surplus in the mid 1990's. My PSU model is +/- 5 V and +/- 0-30 V , 3A max. I need to re-design, more protection, a better balance dual power line and a display monitor. I fry my display monitor board due to a short wires. Hey, it was a DIY board anyway.


I probably have all the parts myself to build a supply, but then again I don't really need to now; I have a couple of smaller bench PSU (really training PSUs - they supply up to 24 volts @ 1.25 amps), and now this 30 volt/3 amp device. What I wish I could afford (or even buy?) is a 0-15 volt, 30 amp adjustable dual output PSU, but it would probably cost waaaay more than I could afford (even a single output supply of that size that was adjustable would be fairly expensive).

For really heavy (12-14 volt) loads, I have a 50 amp car battery charger/starter.

The raison I want to build my own PSU is : Price..They are WAY too expensive.  A brand new beefy transformer is about $50 to $100. A surplus store may sell those transformer cheaper.


They are very expensive when bought new; but I think with what I have now, all my bases should be covered. I've given some thought to maybe building a PSU from a computer power supply (I have a few of those kicking around), but we'll see.

:)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Mar 11, 2012, 07:51 pm

I've given some thought to maybe building a PSU from a computer power supply (I have a few of those kicking around), but we'll see.


That seems to be a popular notion. I have a couple of those running around here, and I've considered it too. Yet, there's the often voiced caveat that they need some min. current draw to properly regulate. I think it was Cyberteque who suggested using an incandescent lamp for 'on', which seems good to me.


This led me down a path to looking in synaptic for "korea" and "adobe-korea" and installing a few pieces


Yeah, these days, when pretty much everything is i18n compliant, having a ton of language packs seems to be way to go, especially with all the e-commerce coming from Asia.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 12, 2012, 02:43 am

That seems to be a popular notion. I have a couple of those running around here, and I've considered it too. Yet, there's the often voiced caveat that they need some min. current draw to properly regulate. I think it was Cyberteque who suggested using an incandescent lamp for 'on', which seems good to me.


I'd probably just use a small power resistor on the 5 volt rail; I'd prefer a nice LED for the power-on indicator. The only reason I would want to have a PC PSU-based bench supply would probably be to have a lot of 5V capacity. The thing I don't like about such supplies is no way to set a current limit (well, not without major mods to the supply itself, which without a schematic and an understanding of switch-mode supplies would probably be very difficult to implement).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Mar 12, 2012, 03:41 am
I'm not sure about "modern" PSUs with an ATX connector.

But I still have a pile of 63W PSUs from IBM-PC and XT machines.
They simply wont come up unless you load the 5V line, I even have a genuine IBM service ballast in it's cute little cage, it has a drive connector on it with only the 5V(red) and Gnd(black) connections.

Apple II PSUs are pretty good, they do the "tick, tick, tick" thing if you overload or short them, supply drops and it comes back when you remove the short.
They need no ballast, Woz is a really clever bloke, without him we would have been hobbled with linear supplies.

Old IBM supplies just shut down and you have to hard reset them with the mains switch.

I have some clone PC PSU's that need no ballast as well.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: takao21106 on Mar 12, 2012, 07:16 pm
I have been scavenging old VCR PCBs a bit too much...the parts are still good, but you can't really keep track of them in terms of inventory, and you can't use these parts for PCBs you sell to customers.

So I have actually purchased a kit of adjustable resistors, even if I am not that much into analogue electronics. Plus some small proto PCBs they offer at good price.

Arrived today.

Actually I don't desolder parts in advance, only if I need some foil capacitor, adjustable resistor, etc.

There are always microcontrollers inside VCRs, but they are e-waste basically, mostly NEC or Mitsubishi made, ROM mask only. Even datasheets are hard to find.

I had one big flat panel recently (television), it had some Lattice CPLDs + many interesting switching supply parts, but...it somehow did not smell good :smiley-sad-blue:
So i dumped it where I found it without scavenging any parts.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 21, 2012, 11:18 pm
Got CR2032 3V lithium button batteries from Deal Extreme. 3 strips of 5 batteries ran me $1.19 ea. If I had bought 5 strips they would have been $.99 ea. A bit less than 3 weeks shipping from HK was free.

I got them because a friend's little granddaughter has a hangman game that eats them and she's been paying almost $5 ea at the corner drug store/thieves den. I gave her 5 and now I'm getting ideas. 3 of these in series is 9V, I wonder if they'd give up more current than a 9V 'transistor' battery?

By all accounts these things are rechargeable. I just dunno how many V I could hit one with, maybe only 3.3-3.5V? Would a USB power wall wart and voltage divider be enough? Or should a charger have a temperature sensor cutoff?

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 21, 2012, 11:27 pm
I'm no battery expert, but I believe lithium batteries have to be charged within about 0.1V of specs, and to certain current limits. Otherwise, fireworks. I advise against a voltage divider.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 22, 2012, 01:51 am
I don't think a CR2032 3V lithium manganese dioxide button battery is rechargeable, but there is a lithium ion button type that is.

From wikipedia:

Quote
Rechargeable variants

Most button cell batteries are not rechargeable due to the inferior capacity and/or high self-discharge rate of rechargeable batteries. There are a few rechargeable button cell batteries, such as lithium-ion rechargeable batteries intended to replace CR-series lithium manganese dioxide batteries in devices with relatively high current consumption or some devices with solar panels which can be used to keep the battery charged under certain circumstances.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 22, 2012, 02:05 am
Bought a pair of these beauties so to have a back-up pair for my ham radio transceiver. A pair of these output 100 watts of RF power. These were NOS (new old stock) and I got a pair with matching date codes of 8813 which is pretty recent for these tubes. Only made new in China these days with mixed opinions on their quality and performance. So the NOS trade is getting pretty pricey for the more desirable tubes. These usually go for around $60-80 a pair in unused and tested condition and I waited for around 3 months to find this pair going for $30 buy it now. He had six available but between two of us they sold out in five mins. E-bay can be great if you are patient and know what you are buying.

Here is similar listing to show what they look like. They run at around 900 volts DC at 200ma on plates.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/RCA-6146B-8298A-Tube-/360375850725?pt=Vintage_Electronics_R2&hash=item53e81316e5
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 22, 2012, 02:10 am
OTOH, oh well, at least they were cheap and
OTOH fireworks you say?  Obviously an outdoor activity but I sorely miss my bags of KClO4 and aluminum dust.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Mar 22, 2012, 02:44 am

OTOH, oh well, at least they were cheap and
OTOH fireworks you say?  Obviously an outdoor activity but I sorely miss my bags of KClO4 and aluminum dust.


Ah, an old basement bomber! That stuff would probably get you thrown in jail these days. We tended to use magnesium and just a bit of antimony disulfide.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 22, 2012, 02:47 am


OTOH, oh well, at least they were cheap and
OTOH fireworks you say?  Obviously an outdoor activity but I sorely miss my bags of KClO4 and aluminum dust.


Ah, an old basement bomber! That stuff would probably get you thrown in jail these days. We tended to use magnesium and just a bit of antimony disulfide.


OK, no drug dealing or latest crack recipes in the 'Your latest purchase' thread.  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Mar 22, 2012, 03:12 am
so what you need is a kilo, a pneumatic ram, and a arch welder ...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 22, 2012, 04:32 am



OTOH, oh well, at least they were cheap and
OTOH fireworks you say?  Obviously an outdoor activity but I sorely miss my bags of KClO4 and aluminum dust.


Ah, an old basement bomber! That stuff would probably get you thrown in jail these days. We tended to use magnesium and just a bit of antimony disulfide.


OK, no drug dealing or latest crack recipes in the 'Your latest purchase' thread.  ;)


Uhhh, nope, not drugs, no way, uh-uh. Fireworks as in pyrotechnics back in the old days (all before 1990) and NO formulas.

However if once these button cells are drained they might get one last bang, well July 4th is coming up.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Mar 22, 2012, 01:28 pm
Ditto, but regardless, this thread probably has the klaxons going off in that little room in the back of the CO.

Just because you're paranoid doesn't mean that they're not out to get you :smiley-eek-blue:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 25, 2012, 11:26 am
Went to Goodwill yesterday (Saturday), and found a bashed up (but possibly serviceable, given a little TLC) styrofoam R/C 3-channel plane (electric). She didn't come with a transmitter, though. She needs more than a bit of work, but it's styrofoam, so nothing a little white glue can't fix. Heck, for the $3.50 USD it cost me, the servos, ESC and motor are worth it even if she never flies again. Then again, maybe she'll become a future UAV?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 25, 2012, 02:17 pm
Could you fit the good parts into another model airframe? Still need the transmitter/controller and from what I've seen, that's the expensive part.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 25, 2012, 07:24 pm

Could you fit the good parts into another model airframe? Still need the transmitter/controller and from what I've seen, that's the expensive part.


Actually, the airframe isn't in too bad a shape; it is all styrofoam. The main problems seem to be in the rear stabilizer: One of the horizontal fins is cracked and just needs a bit of re-gluing, and the movable rudder flap has come loose (the flaps, horizontal and vertical, are attached via these small strips of plastic, which have cracked in half). It also needs a new front landing gear.

I have a couple of transmitters/receivers, though I don't recall if they are 3-channel (I know for sure one is a 2-channel kit). If I take it the UAV route, though, I might just set up some kind of UHF telemetry/control system, with Ardupilot and the rest on-board, and forgo a regular R/C setup.

One of the bad thing about the plane is that everything seems glued in-place (and it looks like it was with epoxy or something); removal of the components and reuse may or may not be possible... :(
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on Mar 25, 2012, 09:19 pm
In no way electronics related, but I just wanted to have it ;-)

Note the matching avatar icon.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7042/7013856653_ac695533b9.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/madworm_de/7013856653/in/photostream/)

Wait, I forgot... there's some electronics stuff.

A couple of folk in the German board wanted to have some F-RAM chips and I just happened to order stuff at mouser anyway. So these are not exactly mine, but I made the purchase ;-)

Ramtron FM24W256-G I²C FRAM 256k 3-5V  (http://www2.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Ramtron/FM24W256-G/?qs=bjAILVtWCMUgvrSlf%2fcnji1wzqhDzaHBKMiw1s4hPYo%3d)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: udoklein on Mar 25, 2012, 10:05 pm
My latest purchase is a filco majestouch tenkeyless keyboard with brown cherries. The price is hefty but I figure I should have bought such a keyboard ten years ago. This thing is worth the pricetag. I bought it basically for the "tenkeyless" feature to get the mouse closer to the keyboard. However typing with this is a completely different experience. Once you are used to it all "standard" keyboards feel like cheap crap.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Mar 26, 2012, 01:33 am
9 inch trinatron tv, we wanted a tv for the spare room, I wanted something small so I didnt have to find room for it so I got this for 6 bucks at goodwill. I was hoping that it would also double as a computer monitor for my apple // but when I plugged it in, its all kinds of blurry on the text ... which is very surprising considering I can darn near read the fine print on TV commercial disclaimers, and the screen is ultra sharp.

maybe I need to go in there and investigate
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: buzzdavidson on Mar 26, 2012, 05:14 am
Picked up a Systron-Donner 7015 frequency counter, some internal component photos posted here: https://plus.google.com/photos/114770676851387917990/albums/5723984429278618033 (https://plus.google.com/photos/114770676851387917990/albums/5723984429278618033)

Still works exceptionally well and appears to be quite accurate.  Not too shabby for a piece of kit from 1970.  I picked it up more for sentimental reasons than for any practical purposes (Grandfather was a ham operator and had a similar unit in his radio shed).  It's fairly large and noisy, but there's something about nixies that I absolutely love. 

A couple of questions for the EE veterans on the board... First, I imagine that this was quite an expensive piece of equipment in the 70s.  Does anyone happen to remember what one of these went for back then?  Second, the unit is capable of measuring frequencies up to 500MHz; what kind of signals would this have been useful for at the time this was released?  Based upon the amount of corrosion on the 500MHz terminal it does not appear to have gotten much use.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 26, 2012, 06:39 am
Once you are used to it all "standard" keyboards feel like cheap crap.


I use an IBM Model M.

8)

Compared to it, all "standard" keyboards -are- crap (especially the mac bluetooth keyboard - I hate it that thing)...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: buzzdavidson on Mar 26, 2012, 07:55 am

I use an IBM Model M.


Also doubles as an excellent personal defense weapon.  That keyboard's a beast :P
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Mar 26, 2012, 07:59 am
Huh.  I really like my low-profile Mac keyboard (I have the wired one.)

Recent Mouser order:  40pin DIP sockets, a couple "new" TI Launchpads, Microchip 10F322 eval board, tips for the new soldering iron, a couple ATmega328 (NOT "328P") to look at optiboot issues, and some of the new FTDI FT230
USB/Serial chips (half the pins and half the price.  More or less.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: udoklein on Mar 26, 2012, 08:19 am
I was considering a Model M as well. However I did not find a Model M with german layout and the tenkeyless feature. Thus I settled for the Filco. I know that the Model M is even better but I love tenkeyless.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 26, 2012, 08:34 am

... but I love tenkeyless.


What is this tenkeyless? Is it like onesheepshort?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: udoklein on Mar 26, 2012, 08:39 am
Have a look at a picture: http://www.amazon.com/Filco-Majestouch-2-Tenkeyless-FKBN87ML-EFB2/dp/B0050ODQEI (http://www.amazon.com/Filco-Majestouch-2-Tenkeyless-FKBN87ML-EFB2/dp/B0050ODQEI). Thus it allows to get the mouse closer to where you are actually typing. Since I got tendonitis I am very sensitive to such details :(
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on Mar 26, 2012, 08:40 am
To me it seems to be a keyboard for folk that have massive-gold taps and plumbing in their house(s). Personally I use a cheap keyboard that is lubricated with lithium grease. Works just fine!

Oh, it seems you can even buy a 10-key upgrade for the 10-key-less keyboard. Now that is a business idea!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 26, 2012, 08:41 am
Just to explain my reference to a few sheep short:

http://dan.hersam.com/lists/not_bright.html
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 26, 2012, 08:57 am

@Udo:  What is this?  Tool for changing keycaps?
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51pJIL6TQcL._AA1200_.jpg
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: udoklein on Mar 26, 2012, 09:05 am
Yes, however my German version did not include such a tool. The anyoing issue is that you can not easily modify US to German layout because the switches are placed slightly differently. Anyway I am very satisfied with my new keyboard :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 26, 2012, 06:22 pm

I was considering a Model M as well. However I did not find a Model M with german layout and the tenkeyless feature. Thus I settled for the Filco. I know that the Model M is even better but I love tenkeyless.


Well, if you found something you're happy with, then ok - but did you try contacting Unicomp (who make the modern Model M)?

http://pckeyboard.com/

They don't seem to offer a "tenkey-less" version as standard, but they do have a "custom keyboard" configuration option, with a "special notes" section. I noticed that they offered German as one of the custom languages, so maybe they might offer a keyboard without the tenkey section as well? They also have the "spacesaver" keyboard, which narrows things up a bit too (but you still have the tenkey).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: udoklein on Mar 26, 2012, 06:39 pm
No, I as soon as I realized that I *want* a tenkeyless keyboard I ordered one. Contacting a manufacturer and waiting is not exactly what I want if I want it *now*. Sine the Filco might last some years I could contact them now though ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on Mar 28, 2012, 08:12 pm
I bought an ATtiny85-centipede, a wire stripper and some AWG-30 material.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7066/7023705987_a24a08223a_n.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/madworm_de/7023705987/) (http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6045/6877596744_cd247b14fb_n.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/madworm_de/6877596744/)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vrnLB4MnwZU
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Mar 29, 2012, 01:52 am
we have those strippers at work, never seen them before but they work really well, and even though its not marked on there they take care of wirewrap wire well too
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Nishant_Sood on Mar 29, 2012, 07:03 pm
I have recently bought a Duemilanove  to use it as a universal avr programmer ,however im right now just Bootloading ATmega8/168/328's with it.

Preparing a long list to buy ,already created a lot, need stuff to get going on and expanding learning to newer areas.

one such new sphere in wireless learning would be Bluetooth, looking for a nice module other than costly BluSmirf's gold or silver.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 29, 2012, 08:40 pm
Just a head's up, especially for those who want to put video on SD. I bought 3 of these for $17.50 ea last Sept before they went out of stock. Now... $14.50 ea. It works very well in low indoor light and bright sunny outside light conditions. It even has sound-activated record mode.

http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?InvtId=BLK-MINIDVR-US&utm_source=geekmail&utm_medium=daily_html&utm_content=Product&utm_campaign=MINIDVR_29mar12

It needs a micro-SD. It puts pictures and video directly to the card... without an Arduino!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Mar 29, 2012, 10:17 pm

I have recently bought a Duemilanove  to use it as a universal avr programmer ,however im right now just Bootloading ATmega8/168/328's with it.

Preparing a long list to buy ,already created a lot, need stuff to get going on and expanding learning to newer areas.

one such new sphere in wireless learning would be Bluetooth, looking for a nice module other than costly BluSmirf's gold or silver.


Master/slave or just slave? I have iteadstudio slave module and shield for a total of about $20 only. Master costs a lot more.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Nishant_Sood on Mar 29, 2012, 10:46 pm
Quote
Master/slave or just slave? I have iteadstudio slave module and shield for a total of about $20 only. Master costs a lot more.


Hi liudr ,Master  :*
It does programming for me and using Kimio Kosaka's BitBang ,its easy to be turned into a universal programmer here >>www.geocities.jp/arduino_diecimila/bootloader/index_en.html
What method you are using?

and i bought this one Duemilanove >> http://www.ebay.in/itm/USB-Atmega328-Arduino-AVRdude-ArduinoISP-programmer-/140668459124?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_203&hash=item20c07e5874

However one IC is missing in this clone , they have installed jumpers in place of it, so as to ADD a advantage of AVRDude programmer.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Apr 02, 2012, 06:34 am
our local goodwill has not been sucking at all this spring (you gotta love spring cleaning) aside from their usual 100 clock radios, 40 George Foreman grills, and jack squat of nothing else I have been able to pick up ...

a previously mentioned 40 gig TVio, which the drive went into my bench machine and the box is in the process of becoming a 250GB closet NAS (we dont need THAT much storage its around a 90GB glob between the two of us, so that will work until I can get a pi, then I will expand it up to 1 or 2 TB)

a previously mentioned 9 inch Sony trinitron for the spare room that I can use while poking at tronics, or we both can use while using our exercise machine (of death, dang that thing can wind me)

but this weekend I managed to scape up a CDRW / DVD / DVD + R for 2 bucks, which is very handy since my current bench machine came out of the dumpster with its DVD-RW drive (intermittently) DOA and I have been using a plain old CD-ROM drive ... and something that made me stupid happy a 5.6 inch TFT LCD monitor.

The LCD monitor is a Audiovox model VBPEX64, and years ago when I worked for a mobile audio/video WD they were about 200 bucks. Stereo, Composite and SVIDEO in, dual headphone jacks out they were a module to work with other Audiovox units, such as a portable DVD player, vcr, or a aftermarket car sun vizor, or seat back units. There is an about 2 inch hinged foot with a basic analog I/O bus edge connector on it, so you can pop it out of your dvd player, and hook it to the back of your headrest, or whatnot.

Most importantly, this was on the edge of faking HD video, and has a 10 to 12Mhz bandwidth input, normal TV is about 6Mhz, so what? Well about 10Mhz is what you need for old computer systems to display clear video in text modes, and that is a HUGE freaking problem for Luddites like me, you end up with a giant ass monitor thats 20+ years old and on the edge of death for a pile of money, a security monitor for a pile of money, A TV tuner card, which its not always convenient to drag your system over to another computer just to see video, or a normal TV which you can make out text in 40 columns with a little squinting.

This thing however, is dead freaking on, its as good as the RGB monitors from the day, and though its small, were dealing with a MINIMUM of a font size being 8x8 pixels, and really its quite comfortable to work on.

Prices seem to be 30-80 bucks, I paid 5, and it looks decent on my semi-portable Apple // C ... epic win

Image of unit sitting on my //C (for other nerds, its a 1986 ROM 255 model, just a month or two away from the next rom version, which fixed a few bugs, next to it is a 1986 Macintosh SE, 800k floppy 80Mb (replacement) hard disk, 4 megs of ram, below that is a 1997 Macintosh 9600/300 with 26GB of storage, 256 megs of ram and a Radieon 7000 with OS9, 10.2 and Debian, next to that is a stack of laptops, 150Mhz Pentium MMX, 80 megs ram, the best LCD ever, 10 inch 1lb subnotebook, 12 inch pentium 90 crappy LCD 8 meg laptop looking for a home, and a DEC PC386SL/25 4 meg VGA laptop featured on slashdot, sort of looking for a home)  

(http://www.cheesefactory.us/apple2/audiovox_mon/PDR_0004.JPG)

close up of 40 column text

(http://www.cheesefactory.us/apple2/audiovox_mon/PDR_0009.JPG)

closeup of 80 column text

(http://www.cheesefactory.us/apple2/audiovox_mon/PDR_0010.JPG)

AND this thing should rock with my recently acquired Trash80.... I R Happy today, 3 weeks in a row goodwill does not SUCK, though it doesnt make up for the three years worth OF sucking, its a start  
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Apr 02, 2012, 07:18 am
Ah, CATALOG.

That brings back old memories. :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 03, 2012, 12:04 am
Since everyone is having a retro moment, can I ask where to find reference to the apple 2 code call -151? Also what key combo triggered this? I couldn't find anything. I remember you have to get into the mini debug program to load games onto memory from tape recorders.

BTW, lost my appetite when shopping for 7-segment displays when I saw this one with a photographed spec sheet and half the diagram was clipped off:

Well only clipped on firefox but that's not the entire story.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/0-287segment-Red-clock-LED-display-common-anode-x2-/310391412337?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4844c51671

I saw a similar display here too with the same spec sheet (pictures are not identical):

http://www.ebay.com/itm/0-56-7-segment-Red-LED-display-common-anode-4pcs-/260984341962?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cc3e105ca

And the decimal points don't work.

If you don't care about what you're selling and whether potential buyer will have the wrong spec, why post it there and why bother selling at all?

I'll probably buy from digikey or sparkfun.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Apr 03, 2012, 12:36 am

Since everyone is having a retro moment, can I ask where to find reference to the apple 2 code call -151? Also what key combo triggered this? I couldn't find anything. I remember you have to get into the mini debug program to load games onto memory from tape recorders.


These might help some:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/143374/call-151-what-did-it-do-on-the-apple

http://mysite.du.edu/~etuttle/math/apple.htm
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 03, 2012, 12:39 am
Liudr, those are kind of small anyway.

http://www.futurlec.com/LEDDisp.shtml

$1.50 for the red .56" 4 digit clock display
http://www.futurlec.com/LED/7FR5643AS.shtml

They have really good prices but the shipping takes a while, it's from Hong Kong.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Apr 03, 2012, 02:21 am
you just type in CALL -151


for monitor commands

http://www.easy68k.com/paulrsm/6502/MONREF.HTM

and no you shouldn't have to load cassette programs from the monitor, just dont use DOS and type LOAD (though it may be a different story if you want to load from tape and save on disk, but there are software utilities for that)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 03, 2012, 02:23 am

Liudr, those are kind of small anyway.

http://www.futurlec.com/LEDDisp.shtml

$1.50 for the red .56" 4 digit clock display
http://www.futurlec.com/LED/7FR5643AS.shtml

They have really good prices but the shipping takes a while, it's from Hong Kong.



Do the decimal points and colon work? Mine has decimal points but probably no LED inside so they are fake decimal points.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Apr 03, 2012, 02:31 am
Adafruit has some 4digit displays now...
There's a lot of room in between a top tier supplier like Avnet and a random and unheard-of eBay dealer, encompassing futurlec, sure electronics, sparkfun, adafruit, and more...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 03, 2012, 02:44 am
I don't have any so I can't say for sure. But Futurlec is not EBay and they've been around at least a few years, even have an address and phone #'s. Oh, and a posted Guarantee:
http://www.futurlec.com/Guarantee.shtml

The main relevant parts as far as I can see:
Quote
Guarantee

All our parts are covered by a 90 day warranty, that the product is free from defects in materials and workmanship. If defects arise during this period, we will at our option, repair or replace the goods purchased or refund your money. Our liability under this warranty is subject to us being satisfied that the material is faulty due to poor materials or workmanship. We will not be responsible for any damage caused by incorrectly connecting or improper use of the material. Furthermore, we will not be liable for any damage to third party or attached equipment to which these products are used.

Terms and Condition of Sale

Unless otherwise explicitly agreed in writing, the conditions as set out below apply to all/each transaction for the sale of goods and materials, design services by Futurlec to a purchaser of Goods and/or Services.


Quote
Goods Warranty

All goods are subject to a 90 day warranty, providing the goods are used within there performance limits, and do not suffer external damage in any way.

For the case of a valid warranty claim, Futurlec can choose either to replace or repair the Goods free of charge or grant credit to or refund to the Purchaser the price of the Goods at Futurlec's sole discretion. Futurlec will have no further liability to the Purchaser under the warranty.

The goods are not suitable for any medical, safety or mission critical applications.


EBay OTOH is more of a dumping ground.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Apr 03, 2012, 06:37 am
The only good thing about ebay is if they give you something bad/faulty u threaten to give back feedback (  ]:D )and so far everytime the've promptly sent a replacement piece,
and like that time I ordered 100ir leds and received 100red ones they sent me the ir and I got to keep the red ones
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Apr 03, 2012, 06:50 am

The only good thing about ebay is if they give you something bad/faulty u threaten to give back feedback (  ]:D )and so far everytime the've promptly sent a replacement piece,
and like that time I ordered 100ir leds and received 100red ones they sent me the ir and I got to keep the red ones


I had that happen to me on a couple of SPI interface color LCD displays; I got the displays, but they were supposed to have breakout PCBs. I asked the guy about it, he apologized and sent the PCBs.

The only problem is that I have no way (not that I've tried yet, though) to connect the two; from what I understand, the flex leads on such devices are meant to be heat/pressure bonded to the PCB. I am not absolutely certain whether I can solder the flex lead down or not (like I said, I have yet to try).

Even so, the devices were too inexpensive not to buy... :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 03, 2012, 07:06 am
I'm the king of lowball ebay parts.. I bottom feed on the stuff that even the most daring ebayers shy away from... and happily, I rarely am disappointed with what I've gotten, particularly when taking into account the prices that can be had by grabbing the stuff nobody else seems to want.

I regularly pick up 1 watt LED's, ten of them for under three dollars shipped (pretty much any standard color inlcuding several whites) for example.  I'm not fool enough to think that the output on these, or their reliability would compare to the specs of a CREE or Philips LumiLED.. but those are also several times the price; and for my purposes, a 50k hour life isn't as important as a lot of light for say 5k hours at the very most in terms of real world use.  I'm a tinkerer, tolerances be damned, it's not like I am going to be nice and drive them within spec anyway ;)

No name ebay sellers often seem to be establishing that "feedback" thing, and personally, I can't help but give an awesome review to the seller that sent me 100 UV LED's, plus 100 resistors to use with them, for two and a half bucks, from halfway across the planet to my doorstep.

Over the years, I've made several hundred purchases off ebay, and I can only say that three of them didn't go perfectly.. and those three were private people selling items, not parts companies selling cheap stock.  Doing business with the far east clearance houses seems to be fairly safe and okay.. as long as you take into account the realities.  First, shipping can take a LONG time, so it's best to use those kinds of places for items to be shelved.. like restocking the resistor bins or bulk small signal transistors.  Second, if you are paying half the market rate for the part, don't be too shocked if there's a quality difference between the ones you get and the top grade.  As long as you are reasonable about what you are buying, those ebay chinese houses and the like can save you a FORTUNE..

Mass produced plastic can be had for a song. I needed a replacement 58mm lens cap.  It took three weeks to arrive... but the price was sixty six cents, shipped.  

(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/58-58mm-Center-Pinch-Snap-on-Front-Lens-Cap-Canon-/00/s/MTAyNFgxMDI0/$(KGrHqMOKjEE6bPlHmM,BOwzKMRT-g~~60_35.JPG)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Nishant_Sood on Apr 03, 2012, 10:35 am
Quote
I ordered 100ir leds and received 100red ones they sent me the ir and I got to keep the red ones


That's a Steal  ;) $)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Apr 03, 2012, 02:01 pm
The prices on those 1w seem to have gone up, some other bidder out there(wonder who)
I used to get 10 for like 2$, even the ocassional lucky 1$, now its more like 3-4
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: takao21106 on Apr 03, 2012, 06:09 pm


Liudr, those are kind of small anyway.

http://www.futurlec.com/LEDDisp.shtml

$1.50 for the red .56" 4 digit clock display
http://www.futurlec.com/LED/7FR5643AS.shtml

They have really good prices but the shipping takes a while, it's from Hong Kong.



Do the decimal points and colon work? Mine has decimal points but probably no LED inside so they are fake decimal points.


Their displays are made by Flying Ningbo, a high quality datasheet is available.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 03, 2012, 09:04 pm

The prices on those 1w seem to have gone up, some other bidder out there(wonder who)
I used to get 10 for like 2$, even the ocassional lucky 1$, now its more like 3-4


Hehehe sorry.  I'm fairly kitted out on them for the moment, but I need to pick up one more pack of greens.  Been amassing them for an unholy attempt at something, even if everything goes kablooie, I'll only be out twenty bucks in LED's or so... but I've only bought like three of the ten piece lots over the past couple of weeks.. so there must be someone else.  Let's hunt them down like rats.  I got plenty cheap last fall, I think I paid around the two dollar mark for the ten piece lots, pretty much the same price give or take a few cents between the red,green,blue and white.

The centerpiece of the project was gotten today.. as far as watts per dollar, this wasn't too bad:

(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/1pcs-50watt-50w-Warm-White-LED-high-power-lamp-light-F-/00/s/NDU1WDUyNw==/$(KGrHqR,!iQE87vsHVVzBPc7UZ1Yc!~~60_12.JPG)

a FIFTY watt LED, Warm White.. $18 shipped.  3500 Lumens of 3000K light, 16-18v @ 2.5-3A.  Going to need a big heatsink, I'm betting.  

By the way, I ran out of the real thing recently, and have found that using good old white lithium grease (very thin layer) is a reasonable alternative to actual heatsink compound.  After doing a bit of reading (including some guy who tested various products, including toothpaste for a chuckle), it would seem that although it's not quite as good as the high performance compounds, as long as the grease remains to act as thermal bridge, for most usage the regular cheap lithium grease might suffice.  A six ounce tube of lithium grease is like five dollars at Home Depot.  Compound is like seven dollars for a half-ounce tube, and I have to drive a half hour to Radio Shack to get it.  Thoughts?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyclegadget on Apr 04, 2012, 06:56 pm

About Lithium grease from wik using search of Lithium:

Quote
Like the other alkali metals, lithium has a single valence electron that is easily given up to form a cation.[2] Because of this, it is a good conductor of heat and electricity


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Apr 04, 2012, 07:02 pm
Quote
a FIFTY watt LED, Warm White.. $18 shipped.  3500 Lumens of 3000K light, 16-18v @ 2.5-3A.  Going to need a big heatsink, I'm betting.


And a big power source and a big current regulator. What the hell are you building a tanning booth?

Lefty

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 04, 2012, 09:20 pm
Remember my remarks about using power LED's as a high precision photography strobe?

The end goal is 10k Lumens of color-tunable pulsed and PWM'd photographic special effects lighting.  Not going to make it that large first pass, maybe half that.. but the proof of concept will be usable.  Arduino for timing and control.. and yeah, I've already got a couple of really bad ideas for sourcing all that power.. as this beast will be portable.  One of the key parts of using LED's is that they can take physical impact pretty well, unlike halogen lamps and xenon tubes.  Photography lighting equipment needs to be durable.. in fact, that dang 10 watt warm white CREE LED fixture I bought at Home Depot is now indispensible in my book.. despite MANY falls, it never fails to light.. and light exactly the same way every time.  Try that with halogen.  Core to the idea is that when used for a modeling lamp, the LED's will be simply dimmed via PWM. The "flash" is actually a period where the PWM is then shut off entirely, and a pulse of desired length (the flash duration) is allowed, then shut off again, while the shutter is opened and closed... after which it returns to the modeling PWM.  Kind of a flash in reverse, really, and allows for some interesting prospects in terms of lighting... as interval between "flashes" isn't defined by a charging capacitor or what-have-you.  Odd mixes of flashes and delays can be easily programmed, as well as chromatic changes during the flash period.  Remember, a Xenon studio flash has a duration of up 1/100 second.. while we can maniulate an LED with a LOT more precision that that.  That's my idea anyway, construction begins soon...

Despite all the reasons it won't work, I'm going to do it anyway.. or possibly catch fire trying.

]:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 04, 2012, 10:49 pm
Have an active cooling system (heat sink and fan) will probably help. My higher power LEDs came mounted against some heat sink and it gets warm after a few seconds. As for wiring, will Teflon coating be a bit better against heat?!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Apr 05, 2012, 01:47 am
Quote
Despite all the reasons it won't work, I'm going to do it anyway.. or possibly catch fire trying.


LOL you might also consider cropping that hair and beard as a proactive safety item. I hate the smell of burning hair.  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 05, 2012, 06:06 am
Well, I did make that RGBW set of 'eyes' for halloween, and that was three watts per color, times two eyes, for a total of 24 watts.. I just used a hunk of scrap aluminum from a cd drive frame, and they didn't even get warm enough to soften hitemp hotmelt glue, which I used to mount them...a dab of compound on the back of each one watter, and the whole thing never got more than warm to the touch.  Even though some folks do, I also won't use the power LEDs just mounted on those 20mm aluminum pads.  Too much scrap around to not heatsink better than that.

(http://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-vyCCIWhsz5k/TqVeqp0hK4I/AAAAAAAAAVY/FbM5JNxe4t4/s800/100_4902.JPG)     (http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-mfde_YQBKfU/TgFEpZ9AgfI/AAAAAAAAAMg/BRO0Yr4JFaI/s800/Untitled.jpg)
(http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-vntUvd0YYr8/TqVenrq7bqI/AAAAAAAAAUs/P9jR1yKCUFg/s720/100_4879.JPG)     (http://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-ouCnXrMdvYM/Tqgh0LDKsXI/AAAAAAAAAWQ/frkyyIp94qA/s800/100_4937.JPG)
(original eyes, current source circuit, and board..eight LM317 current sources with NPN switched sinking.  Arduino provided PWM.  Worked, a few lessons were learned, and laid the idea that what I am going to try to do will be useful at least as solid state programmable lighting for macro work.  I think I can make it more useful than that even, and since I really must admit to being an LED junkie, the whole concept of hundreds of watts of LED light is ridiculous and demands making.. Especially since I love sniping the cheapie low end power LEDs for small money off ebay over time.  If I had to 'get them now' I would pay several times the prices I do.. I just shelve things till I get to them.  I average spending about twenty bucks a month on parts.. probably a good third of that LEDs.)


Supply won't be a problem, and for current regulation on the fifty, I might have to get more creative than the LM317 current source circuits I have grown to love... Though I think that with the addition of a power transistor, I think the basic LM317 current source circuit can use the feedback to control a power transistor capable of feeding 3A.. if I remember right.  That being said, I might look into something a bit more robust.. Anyone got a particularly good high power LED current source circuit?

For control, I have made some Darlington pairs with 2n2222 up front and TIP41C as the load transistor, takes only a milliamp or so for switching and the TIP41s are rated for 6A if I remember.  Yeah I should use a MOSFET, but I'm doing it on the cheap from the bins, more ebay sniping.

Here's one that I have gotten three sets of now.. I love them, but I haven't actually measured the light output, I would say they are closer to twice the one watters than they are to three times as bright.  In any case, the awesome part is that they have the current regulator on board, 500ma.. Just feed them 5-6v and heat sink them and you are good to go!  I've been getting them in lots of five for between three and five dollars.. Well worth giving a try.  Nice warm color too, I would guess around 2800K.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/170813849024?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2648#ht_2845wt_922
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/5x-2-3W-high-power-LED-3-2-6V-Constant-500mA-Warm-White-/00/s/ODI0WDEwMjQ=/$(KGrHqJHJD!E9!YZftCnBPcdqy75m!~~60_35.JPG)

They are current regulated, and function all the way down to 3.2v.. Perfect for using with a small signal NPN direct to the 5v rail, I would think, but haven't actually tried.  I have been putting two in series and driving from 12v.  Since the drop from an NPN transistor is typically .7v (right?) that would put it right in the middle in terms of what it wants in terms of supply voltage if run from the 5v rail.  At half an amp though, it's worth thinking about how much load you are putting on the poor little 5v regulator on the arduino..

That brings me to the last 'class' of LED I have gotten.. Not tried them yet in a project..
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/2x-H1-102-SMD-LED-Bulb-/00/s/MTI5OFgxNjAw/$(KGrHqJHJCgE9!MFGW2FBPVGI6PSc!~~60_35.JPG)

Each one is 102 LEDs.. They are H1 headlight automotive bulbs, 6w each.  Obviously they don't expect current regulation as they are meant to swap in for standard halogen bulbs.. So should be interesting to see how they perform.  Got the pair for two fifty shipped, worth trying out!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Apr 05, 2012, 06:12 pm
Yesterday, my order from Electronic Goldmine arrived; none of it I really "needed"...

In my order I purchased another "super surprise box"; it alone must have weighed 5 pounds or so. Opened it up, looked at the "junk on top":

* various small SPDT PCB switches
* several large DP3T switches (8 contacts, IIRC)
* A few in-bag coax connectors (almost BNC, but not quite)
* Various LEDs (including several double "stacked" red and green; like you might find on a router)
* Various resistors, caps, etc
* A couple of microswitches (including a really, really tiny one)
* Various tactile button switches
* Potentiometers and trimmers
* Various small signal transformers

I didn't dig through all of it, but it was a real smorgasbord of components! :D

My other things were a few semiconductor "grab bags" (didn't look at them), 50 SMT 595 shift-registers, several double-element photocells (I might have to get more of them; they are really interesting), and 20 photo-reflective sensors (they are much smaller than I expected, which is great for my needs).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 06, 2012, 03:32 am

several double-element photocells (I might have to get more of them; they are really interesting)


Are the outputs separate?

I wonder because a PIR sensor has 2 elements and you get the difference for output.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Apr 06, 2012, 08:37 am
Quote
Electronic Goldmine

I really like Electronic Goldmine.  They have a better handle on the concept of "surplus" than a lot of places.  Alas, that does mean that once things are gone, they may be gone forever!
(get your CDS photocells while you can.  Not RoHS compliant, you know!)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Apr 07, 2012, 08:05 am


several double-element photocells (I might have to get more of them; they are really interesting)


Are the outputs separate?

I wonder because a PIR sensor has 2 elements and you get the difference for output.




The outputs are separate; there are three leads on the device (one lead is a shared common)...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Apr 07, 2012, 08:08 am

Quote
Electronic Goldmine

I really like Electronic Goldmine.  They have a better handle on the concept of "surplus" than a lot of places.  Alas, that does mean that once things are gone, they may be gone forever!
(get your CDS photocells while you can.  Not RoHS compliant, you know!)


I'm not too worried about that; Apache Reclamation seems to have a nearly endless supply (they also sell 60/40 bar solder - if you really need a lot)...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Apr 08, 2012, 06:26 am
ATI 6870

the wife needs a more powerful graphics card, and it came down to a nvidia GTX560 and an ati 6870 (for the $$$), the ati edged out the nvidia in the important marks, it was slightly cheaper and it came with the new deus ex game (which I will play)

usually I am a nvidia fanboi, but she will never run linux, its a ever so slightly faster card, its slightly cheaper, and honestly I have zero issue with dropping an ati in a system, done it since the 3Dfx days

bonus side is I get a "new" graphics card, though I play more games, I run a much lower resolution (1280x1024 vs 19200x1080), and she plays "the sims" wich is a piled on cluster of high count objects. Her old GTX260 will be a welcome bump from my 9600GT

besides you gotta keep the wife happy right .. hehe
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 08, 2012, 05:06 pm
You'll like the game, but just as it starts getting good, it's over... IMO

I got it via Steam, after buying the key from a guy on ebay, he already had the game but bought a new vid card.  I was able to get the game key for three bucks or something...hehe.  Right now, I am playing 'STALKER call of Pripyat' that I got the same way.. Three fifty for that one. Stalker is a primitive game in many ways.. But for some reason, you keep going back to it, like Fallout and Borderlands...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/180849891629?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649#ht_500wt_922
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 09, 2012, 11:34 pm
3dfx cards, that's right. Were there several 3rd party 3dfx cards that were impossible to get the right driver for? They used to have how much VRAM? 4MB?
I'm not playing much games anymore. The next real game I'll play is gonna be my own game with virtual reality supported by arduino or paint a dinosaur or alike with my kid in the future :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 11, 2012, 06:26 pm
Here's a good one (I hope).. USA seller, overstock liquidator:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/10-PCS-RFD3055LE-RFD3055-IC-BOX-86-/160768659447?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item256e8f0ff7

(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/10-PCS-RFD3055LE-RFD3055-IC-BOX-86-/00/s/OTYwWDEyODA=/$(KGrHqF,!ocE9eGelY)JBP,2rrD4c!~~60_57.JPG)


MOSFET N-Channel, Metal Oxide
Logic Level Gate
Drain to Source Voltage (Vdss)                60V
Current - Continuous Drain (Id) @ 25° C   11A
Rds On (Max) @ Id, Vgs                         107 mOhm @ 8A, 5V
Vgs(th) (Max) @ Id                               3V @ 250µA
Gate Charge (Qg) @ Vgs                       11.3nC @ 10V
Input Capacitance (Ciss) @ Vds               350pF @ 25V
Power - Max                                        38W


$2.50 for TEN of them, $1.95 shipping, and they'll combine shipping on orders.  I bought one pack of ten, and I think I may add a second.. anyone see a problem with these?  By what I know, that's a pretty decent power MOSFET, usable for just about anything, logic level.  As I understand it, I should be able to substitute one of these for what I normally would use a Darlington pair for, correct? Pretty much drop it in (maybe with addition of resistor between the gate and drain, gotta look up how these hook up)?

This is my first foray into MOSFET land, and I think I have the idea of them.  The gate charge and capacitance still confuses a bit, but if I am reading this correctly, I ought to be able to switch (for an example application, Power LED PWM dimming) 12v @ up to 3A (because of the 38 watt limit) without any additional components other than a Gate resistor and resistor between the Gate and Drain.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Apr 11, 2012, 07:01 pm
Quote
12v @ up to 3A (because of the 38 watt limit)


No that's not how you calculate actual device power dissapation. It's the Rds on resistance and the current flowing through the device that represents the heat loss the package must dissapate. So current squared X Ron would (for your example) be (3AX3A) X .1 ohms = .9 watts dissapation.

Another words the device's maximum power dissapation in not dependent on what the external load is dissapation, but rather the power the device is dissapating, which is quite different.

Lefty

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 11, 2012, 10:07 pm
Not sure if they are enhancement or depletion mode MOSFETs. I have some small-current enhancement mode MOSFET. They are like normally open switches so you apply voltage to close the switch to complete the circuit. Depletion mode (I think) is just the opposite.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Apr 12, 2012, 02:36 am
Got the video card in, came with a download coupon for Deus Ex, opened the box and the maker put a download coupon for Dirt3 in there (stupid song voice)

I got two "free" games woot woot
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 12, 2012, 06:36 am
Even better is that they are not physical discs.  I love Steam.. any PC I sit down at (and some games even on Macs), I have my full game library.  With a good broadband connection, you can download a game with a 8GB install in thirty minutes or less.  Never lose the disc or cd key again.  "Cloud" technology (blah blah blah, it's repackaged Napster protocol, by multilocating the data at multiple physical sites, they not only maintain 100% data integrity, they make the download speeds ridiculously fast because you are streaming data from mutiple locations at once.  It's Napster rather than Gnutella because of the centralized authentication and hash distribution, Gnutella was far more robust, as the hash was decentralized, the hash and authentication were part of the data stream).  Storage Area Networks delivered.. Ken Olsen and Harlan Anderson would be so proud.. (they were right, just thirty years ahead of their time)

Anyway, sounds like the MOSFET purchase was a good one.. I may just end up replacing the Darlington pairs in my current strobe build.. sounds like the MOSFET can handle MUCH more power and is substantially faster and more efficient at the switching... awesome!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Apr 12, 2012, 01:57 pm
They definetly are, I used to use tip 122,125 all the time for switching stuff before I learned how to use logic level power mosfets, I used to have a decent heatsink to get 3 amps out of it but now I got a 120v 40amp logic level mosfet that doesn't get warm even at 3a
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Apr 13, 2012, 05:26 am
Maths coprocessor chip ...

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/uM-FPU_photo.jpg)

Now to fire the sucker up ...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 13, 2012, 07:31 am
That might deserve a library able to handle real doubles!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Apr 16, 2012, 03:37 am
MicroVGA output device for the Arduino:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399n.jpg)

From:

http://www.microvga.com/

Using SPI you can send text to a normal VGA monitor (most of us will have one of them lying around).

Example output ...

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399m.jpg)

I modified the Arduino Adventure game I was working on, to quickly replace Serial with a class based on Stream which outputs to this device instead. Haven't got the keyboard working yet, but once done, you could have a full text adventure running out of a tiny box.

You can have colours and stuff like that ... I haven't had time to do that yet. An old PS2 keyboard plugs into it, so you have both input and output.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 16, 2012, 04:23 pm
Neat game! Now if someone could just make an easy SRAM expansion kit for UNO that won't cost 15 pins. The 32KB flash on UNO seems big compared with 2KB SRAM. If you construct c-strings in your memory you run out of memory quickly.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 16, 2012, 04:34 pm
32k code is plenty if there's a data device like SD card behind it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: E40racer on Apr 16, 2012, 10:09 pm
Received 30$ of components from Tayda electronics last week. A bunch of voltage regulators, leds, transistors, mosfets, switches and 2 ATmega 328P-PU's. Will try to put a bootloader on them later this week.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 17, 2012, 02:46 am
With westfw's optiloader, I was able to crank out bootloaded ATMEGA328P's at around 9 second each. Bootloaded 100 chips last time.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Apr 17, 2012, 06:21 am
hey nick, need some help with the "graphics" I still (for some reason) enjoy poking at text graphics, and I am not the only one, not my work but check out

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t76kr2lKC2k&feature=relmfu
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Apr 17, 2012, 06:25 am
Looks pretty slick. I doubt you could do that with many text cards. Could be a 3D program with "text" widgets.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Apr 17, 2012, 06:42 am
yea thats a full blown pc chugging away at it
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: amacmullen14 on Apr 22, 2012, 09:18 pm
A sparkfun serial-enabled LCD kit.

I might use it on my forever-a-WIP arduino midi synth, it'll definitely be more readable than an 8x16 LED display.  But the led matrix is cool, I'll probably keep that, and just have a second display.  I dunno.

The extra 328 chip will also be useful; maybe I could modify the code to make the LED matrix also Serial controlled by the master duemilanove.  I've noticed some display flicker above 8 note polyphony right now; it has to constantly scan each row on the display, and the 31250Hz interrupt routine bogs it down enough to be noticeable.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 23, 2012, 12:07 am
Took the plunge, I have been saving for quite some time.. I have upgraded the weapon.  I now am the excited owner of a Canon T2i.   For pros, they'll still chuckle a little, but I don't care.  Max ISO increase from 1600 to 12800.  Eighteen megapixel, versus my Rebel XT, which is an iffy 8 megapixel.  Fifteen years of product design and engineering better.  Also paired it with the pro version of my favorite lens, the nifty fifty, in an even larger and better built f/1.4.

The manager of the store asked what my goals were, which led to giving the guy the nickel version of my situation.  He cut me some awesome deals by the end, I have essentially replaced the key portions of my camera system, a professional backdrop (needed badly), reflectors and diffusers, remote trigger, and a desperately needed media drive for the computer, USB  Seagate 1.5TB (a hundred bucks!) media drive for my photos.. ALL of that totalling under two thousand.  This is however an investment.  I know two grand may not sound like an earthshaking amount, but on the budget we live, it's no small feat to sock away even a hundred dollars a month.. Something always breaking, etc. 

I have booked a couple of engagement photos and head shots, which will bring (with the savings of two years of these types of gigs!) enough to cover the cost of this.  If photography is an art, I just got my first real set of brushes.  Just plain excited, my old camera was beginning to fail.  I get small shoots, but usually they are aware that I am unreliable at best.  However, slow and steady wins the race, and after two years of ferreting away.. I've made enough doing headshots, puppies, and engagement announcement photos to pull off this upgrade.  Feed the disease.  Now I need to figure out what to start saving soda cans and snapshot money for.  Actually I know already.. A quality telephoto for my nature shots.  Almost as much for that one lens as it was to replace all that hardware!

Not really Arduino related I know.. Photography is my other passion other than Arduino.  When I am sick, sometimes I can get my mind into a project or a shot, and shake the tendency to perseverate on the bad stuff.  Gimped up again at the moment, so I'm gonna find something to do some macro shots of I think.   My white moth orchid is in full glory, maybe that'll be the target of my distraction... If I can pull my crap together, the low light capabilities of this new kit will complement my LED photo strobe awesomely....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Apr 23, 2012, 12:34 am
Does it have an external (like, TTL level) shutter? You might be able to do some high-speed shots of stuff like glass breaking, water drops, etc.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 23, 2012, 02:08 am
Both wired (like my XT) as well as infrared (which I suspect is slower).   :D

One of my first projects was an intervalometer trigger to run a series of bracketing shots for HDR rendering... 2.5mm plug and a optoisolator, you are in business!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Apr 26, 2012, 12:50 am
Just received another batch of stuff. I tend to just toss on a few extra things in whenever I have a few specific things to buy. So I got:
  some 16Mhz crystals and caps to go with them
  L386 op-amps, and some trim pots and resistors to use with them
  a handful of JFETs, also to be used with the L386
  a 1-sided PCB -- yes, I'm going to try my hand at etching
  a couple rotary encoders
  a few hall sensors -- I have the magnets coming from Amazon, because it's way cheaper to buy 40 of them that way than a dozen from any electronics shop

Hoping the low-price ATMega chips are still a deal at Mouser, because I still need to get stuff to drive a little DC motor (got another thread going for that).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: bojj on Apr 26, 2012, 04:18 am
Buying a Dremel 300 and a drill press mount for it. Also, I'm getting some etching solution and some blank copper boards for etching.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Apr 26, 2012, 04:29 am

Buying a Dremel 300 and a drill press mount for it. Also, I'm getting some etching solution and some blank copper boards for etching.


Do you know that you can make cheap etchant using muriatic acid and hydrogen peroxide?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 26, 2012, 05:58 am

Hoping the low-price ATMega chips are still a deal at Mouser, because I still need to get stuff to drive a little DC motor (got another thread going for that).

Get a quote from with your desired amount and the price should be good for 30 days for you to decide whether to buy or not.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Apr 26, 2012, 06:56 am
the mouser list

2* SMD ceramic resonators
2* Atmega328p dip
2* Atmega328p tqfp (looks huge compared to what I have been hand soldering at work)
1* Atmega644p dip
10* 7805 TO22

from ebay, crash's arduino mega clone suggestion

and some burgers
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Nishant_Sood on Apr 26, 2012, 06:58 am
A Bought a Loads of stuff  8) op-amps to ATmega8's to headers to connectors to GLCD 128x64 to Micro bump switches to optical distance measurer's and a TONNE of other stuff.

but recently just today i bought a NETDUINO that is of no comparison to our Arduino but still sports that design along with a ATmega328 TQFP package and 1 three RGB LED BAR and a FIO good healthy amount of bill.

(http://www.rhydolabz.com/images/large/1834_LRG.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TonyD on Apr 26, 2012, 11:33 am
Raspberry Pi :-)

http://zuzebox.wordpress.com/2012/04/18/at-last-a-raspberry-pi-to-play-with/
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Apr 27, 2012, 12:34 am


Hoping the low-price ATMega chips are still a deal at Mouser, because I still need to get stuff to drive a little DC motor (got another thread going for that).

Get a quote from with your desired amount and the price should be good for 30 days for you to decide whether to buy or not.


I pulled the trigger on that last night. Of course, I later remembered that I could use some 1/4" phone jacks and plugs, but those I can find at RS, I'm pretty sure.

My neodymium magnets arrived today, so of course I had to use them to make it look like I'd gotten a lip piercing and wander around the office a bit. :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Apr 27, 2012, 10:30 pm

from ebay, crash's arduino mega clone suggestion

and some burgers


With absence of capitalized letter I am very tempted to read the whole thing as one sentence. The "ebay" berger reminds me the presidential chicken nugget sold on ebay.  :smiley-mr-green:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Apr 27, 2012, 11:08 pm


from ebay, crash's arduino mega clone suggestion

and some burgers


With absence of capitalized letter I am very tempted to read the whole thing as one sentence. The "ebay" berger reminds me the presidential chicken nugget sold on ebay.  :smiley-mr-green:


Well, apparently, you can get a cheeseburger in a can (http://www.cheeseburgerinacan.com/) on ebay. I couldn't find one, but there's a screenshot.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 28, 2012, 02:21 am
Vending machine food, now packaged and delivered to your door in ALL its goodness! (yuck!)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Apr 28, 2012, 06:59 am
Would you believe that I write test plan / result documentation during the day, and for a website at night? So, when I don't get monies I get lazy on the typing. <There I added a period and capped my sentences
:P
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 03, 2012, 12:07 am
One-wire button ...

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/One_Wire_Button.jpg)

Now to figure out how to use it ...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on May 03, 2012, 05:17 am

What sort of button is it?  Temperature?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on May 03, 2012, 05:26 am
from the maxim website

Quote
The Address Only iButton is our DS1990A and is our basis model. It contains 64bits of Read Only Memory (ROM)


its meant for tagging stuff with UUID's

http://www.maxim-ic.com/products/ibutton/products/ibuttons.cfm (http://www.maxim-ic.com/products/ibutton/products/ibuttons.cfm)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 03, 2012, 06:52 am
I was thinking of this thread:

http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?topic=103699

And in particular the YouTube video it linked to.

They were using those buttons as a Orienteering "record keeping" system, so you tagged the button on a reader at each checkpoint.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on May 03, 2012, 07:10 am
aye its great if you want a dongle that you check in at points to do XYZ, plug in, read UUID, log
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on May 03, 2012, 07:16 am

Cool.  A lasertag place I take my niece to uses the same buttons for "activation tokens".  Should work well for orienteering.

Quote
And in particular the YouTube video it linked to.


Gotta love the connector he made (connector for a garden hose, one screw, and some rubber).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 03, 2012, 07:22 am

Cool.  A lasertag place I take my niece to uses the same buttons for "activation tokens".  Should work well for orienteering.


He was thinking of an RFID system rather than those things. The RFID cards are cheaper, being passive devices. Still, interesting to investigate both methods.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 05, 2012, 01:06 pm
avrispmkII clone, LUFA based, can supply 5V or 3.3V to the target, 4 MHz rescue clock, TPI, ISP and PDI (for ATxmega) support.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7207/6998332142_4fbe8e28bc_n.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/madworm_de/6998332142/in/photostream/)

Programming speed is very high (setting the SCK period appropriately) compared to my usbtiny. It works with avrdude 5.11 + linux and AVR Studio on windows. Although I had read otherwise I did not have to change the programmer's firmware to make avrdude work. This may be different on windows.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/USB-AVRISP-mkII-mk2-clone-ATMEL-AVR-ISP-PDI-TPI-Xmega-/160690475020?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2569e6100c

Some more (http://www.bravekit.com/USB_AVR_ISP_AVRISP_mkII_programmer_PDI_TPI_ATxMega_Xmega) info.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on May 05, 2012, 08:27 pm

@madworm: How is the SCK period set?  Configuration tool?  avrdude?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 05, 2012, 09:32 pm
It is set with avrdude using "-B xxx" or in AvrStudio. The settings are not  permanent. It defaults back to a low clock speed every time. With "-B 1" it get about 16kb/s programming speed (tested with an ATmega64).

And it seems you really need to flash a recompiled firmware if using libusb on windows - as per instructions supplied with LUFA.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 06, 2012, 12:44 am
After playing around with ISCP programming here (http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11633) I realized you could get quite fast programming depending on the target chip.

To program the ATtiny84 I had to add this:

Code: [Select]
  SPI.setClockDivider(SPI_CLOCK_DIV64);

But that had an internal 8 MHz clock. To program (talk to) the Atmega328P I didn't need that line. So that was a 64x speed difference.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 06, 2012, 11:00 pm
@Nick:

Personally I don't ever use an Arduino board as a programmer. And certainly I can't and don't recommend that to anybody else - except maybe in case of emergency or for the purpose of learning. Excellent dedicated programmers are widely available for little money, certainly for less than getting another Arduino board. These are things you can rely upon.

There are quirks depending on the kind of Arduino hardware you have, the type of bootloader that is on there, the version of the IDE you use (serial buffer size!) and so on. Nobody really wants to deal with all of that. And it is certainly not easier or more user friendly for beginners either. It is a sad mess.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on May 06, 2012, 11:05 pm
hm I have been doing it for years with all sorts of IDE's bootloaders and host chips ... never been a sad mess to me, and never really been worth spending money for yet another dongle to keep track of even if it is a couple bucks for a poor quality quirky USBASP

*shrug*
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 06, 2012, 11:30 pm
I'm talking about avrispmkII and clones thereof.

Doesn't require an auto-reset disabling cap/resistor, doesn't depend on any serial buffer size settings in 'HardwareSerial.cpp', you don't have to change its behaviour if you feel like you need a programmer, it just works. No mess of wires either. No having to remember which wire to plug in where... However it does depend on the correct driver to be installed (at least on windows) - and if you don't switch between avrdude / AvrStudio back an forth all the time this is something you do exactly ONCE. And if you run windows in a virtual machine (linux host), you don't even have to switch between libusb and 'jungo' either.

My mind is set.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on May 06, 2012, 11:40 pm
actually the ISP harnesses is one of the reasons I am not that interested in most solutions, its 10-13 on arduino, and I dont feel like making a cute little breakout board for each and every family of chip I own (which is a lot)

as far as the cap/resistor, there is a zero ohm resistor on the board, add a simple 2 pin jumper there once and problem solved, and I have never had to fuss with HardwareSerial.cpp ever once

I am glad you love your doo-dad, and that's your thing, but I do feel like your making a mountain out of a molehill about using the arduino as an ISP, and many noobies, including myself really don't like hearing "buy more crap" when a target chip, bread board and 6 wires does work
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 07, 2012, 12:04 am
Ah well. Each to their own.

The beauty of getting the right type of programmer is that it is not yet another thing in a box - you only need the one. Put a programming header onto your boards and you don't have to build any adapters. Plug it in, hit enter, done. Target type doesn't matter a thing.

And yes, you can drill a hole into a concrete wall using a spoon.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on May 07, 2012, 12:31 am
Quote
And yes, you can drill a hole into a concrete wall using a spoon.


Or I could just use the drill I already have hehe

ok Im done
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 07, 2012, 12:38 am

@Nick:

Personally I don't ever use an Arduino board as a programmer. And certainly I can't and don't recommend that to anybody else - except maybe in case of emergency or for the purpose of learning. Excellent dedicated programmers are widely available for little money, certainly for less than getting another Arduino board. These are things you can rely upon.


Oops. I just did exactly that:

http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11635

The inspiration for this project was that I had just spent about 4 days helping someone because their "dedicated programmer" didn't work for the Mega2560. Finally I think he had to order a second dedicated programmer (the Atmel one) for around $60 + postage.

Meanwhile, what I describe in that post programs a Mega in 3 seconds, with a simple cable you can make up and use for any board that has the standard ICSP header on it.

Quote
There are quirks depending on the kind of Arduino hardware you have, the type of bootloader that is on there, the version of the IDE you use (serial buffer size!)


My programmer doesn't use the serial buffer, except to output confirmation messages to the user.  The thing is, it's self-contained. It doesn't rely on the right version of avrdude, connected to the IDE, connected to a USB port, with the right entries in boards.txt, and the right configuration for avrdude, and so on. It's basically hardware talking to hardware, using the interface documented in the datasheet.

If you were selling Unos (or clones) you could program one as fast as you can plug the cable in (one second programming time). You might modify it slightly to have a "program" button and a red/green light to show when it is done, or if it failed.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 07, 2012, 01:26 am
@Nick: you are forgiven. Not that it means anything coming from me ;-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on May 07, 2012, 02:21 am
Quote
These are things you can rely upon.

So you like to think.  They're still not considered "production caliber" programmers by the pros (for one thing, they want to be able to "verify" at the extremes of the documented supply voltages.)  And people have reported assorted problems with AVRISP "clones", and even the "real" Atmel version (like the different firmware versions, depending on OS and programmer SW.)

Yeah, by the time you spend 3 to 6x the cost of an Arduino, you probably have something you can count on.  Lower-cost solutions, I'm not so sure about.

(A nice thing about ArduinoISP is that if it doesn't work, you can theoretically fix it.  Less so with a professional programmer.  On the third hand, a lot of the "issues" raised here are really due to people trying to use a programmer without really having the background they ought to.  Of course, I never got my (real, Atmel) STK500 to successfully program by tiny11s, either.  What awful instructions and what a kludge of jumpering!)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 07, 2012, 02:55 am
I think most of the problems automagically go away once you have a working programmer sitting in a box. Probably due to the fact that this usually comes with a more experienced user.

And maybe I should I will avoid reading posts like "upload doesn't work" and the likes for a while.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 07, 2012, 03:08 am
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7227/7120754963_a0c691b5f4_m.jpg)  (http://www.flickr.com/photos/madworm_de/7120754963/)(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7176/7120754871_04631e9a07_m.jpg)  (http://www.flickr.com/photos/madworm_de/7120754871/)(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8168/6974671304_018171954d_m.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/madworm_de/6974671304/)

A tiny PIR sensor board - including a fingerprint of an unknown laborer. Depending upon the position of the 0-Ohm resistor the output is either re-triggerable (H) (always HIGH if motion is detected) or not (L). The default setting is the (L) position. Range is a couple of meters. It requires at least 5V to work properly and the output is either 0V or 3.3V (both driven).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on May 09, 2012, 02:15 am
Tried to get some 7-segment LED displays and ended up with these:

Will wait for the right parts to come in.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 14, 2012, 01:03 am
BAV99 dual diode next to a 20c coin:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399_BAV99_diode.jpg)

The trick is not to drop it on the floor, because then you never see it again. :O




Atmega1284P ... now to do some serious processing:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399_Atmega1284P.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 15, 2012, 02:24 am
Got my USBASP. Also got maybe the flu. Whaaaa!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 15, 2012, 03:26 am
(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Diablo3_dragon.jpg)

Diablo 3 Collectors Edition. :)

This is relevant because that thing sticking out the front is a USB stick. ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 15, 2012, 01:37 pm
What exactly are we looking at?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on May 15, 2012, 05:24 pm
Quote
What exactly are we looking at?

The horns of a defeated evil demon, with an embedded flash drive.
Or something like that.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on May 15, 2012, 05:34 pm
(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTIwMFgxNjAw/$(KGrHqNHJBcE7)u7Icn4BP!lpNiIHw~~60_58.JPG)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/180875141679?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649
A GSI Lumonics Chart Recorder.  Near as I can tell, it's a serial thermal printer.  I'm not sure of the exact use yet, but I got it for $1.04 including shipping...lol... I am such a bottom feeder...

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NTAwWDUwMA==/$(KGrHqF,!qsE-ZQP0IpcBPoJZNV2HQ~~60_1.JPG)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/270968363698?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2649
10W warm white LED with 110v AC driver... $4.75 shipped

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MjAwWDIwMA==/$(KGrHqV,!jEE9)RbYFrEBPj4yGnrjw~~60_35.JPG)  (http://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-FwLsPY8WkRQ/T7KeQZCGEJI/AAAAAAAAA24/w3It3vkeZ1o/s800/IMG_1243.JPG)    (http://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-63onmSlD3OE/T7KeftWkCII/AAAAAAAAA3M/4aBd0oGrpaA/s800/IMG_1248a.jpg)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/251043976328?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1497.l2648
Extra Bright UV LED 3W, 150 Degrees, 400nm, 400mW, 4V x 0.7A.
Manufacturer- Edison Opto(Taiwan).... $1.99 shipped

The UV LED is the center of a UV LED flood/wash light I am making.  There's an abandoned railway tunnel not far from me, about a quarter mile long and abandoned for about a hundred years now.  Mostly safe, though several minor collapses along the rough-cut rock faces give me the willies at times. Dead isn't even the word for what would you would be if the tunnel collapsed.  Only half the run is reinforced and concrete-lined, the shot above is from the point where the concrete ends, about halfway through.  The thing is, there's calcite and other minerals leaching through the rock now, and last time I was there discovered some areas and deposits mildly fluoresced when hit with blue light from an LED flashlight.  I'm building the UV with a mix ranging from 400nm to 380nm, whatever I got cheapest as I bought, so the light should cover that band fairly well.  Should have a total of about 14 watts of fairly directional UV, this 3 watter is the widest by far.  Should make for some interesting photo lighting... never ever do I stop tinkering.  

Been hosed for a few days, so i couldn't get downstairs to mess with the LED photoflash and trigger.. stairs and blown out lumbar disk don't mix.  Seems better today, so I might be able to drag my carcass around a bit and get some tinkering in... Gonna need to get the spine working better to actually take the UV up to the railway tunnel.. but I'm nothing if not patient..
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 15, 2012, 06:22 pm
Re: obscure curled object

Glued to a long stick this would make a good back scratcher. Attach id to a piece of rope and you get a grapple or some sort.

Are there any BFGs in that game?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on May 15, 2012, 09:46 pm

Re: obscure curled object

Glued to a long stick this would make a good back scratcher. Attach id to a piece of rope and you get a grapple or some sort.

Are there any BFGs in that game?


I thought the Big Funny Gun is in Doom. You pull the trigger and everyone else will be having fun. In Doom 3 if you hold it for too long, past the last bar, well, the fun is all yours. I'm happy to see that Diablo franchise is also into getting real mixed with game or whatever you call it.

A company (??) made a game where you need to put a statue on a pedestal in order to activate that character and play it anywhere (even in friends' home) with that character. It's a new market of augmented reality. If doom is in this business, they can sell all the cute tiny guns that you can pick up from your desk and stick to your special mouse to fire that gun.

There is also a market to sell advanced weapons for real money by the game company so you can blast through all levels and make fun of other online gamers with your $99-purchased BFG and call all others poppers. Kind of sick business model but should fit well with losers that are looking for "respect" in game reality, none of us, right, so who cares?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on May 15, 2012, 10:56 pm
Quote
Kind of sick business model

I have a friend who works in the "social gaming" business (facebook, etc.)
She has described their business model as "selling stuff to addicts."  (typically, you can PLAY for free, but a bunch of the "neat" items can only be bought with what amounts to real money.)  Meh.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on May 15, 2012, 11:38 pm

Quote
Kind of sick business model

I have a friend who works in the "social gaming" business (facebook, etc.)
She has described their business model as "selling stuff to addicts."  (typically, you can PLAY for free, but a bunch of the "neat" items can only be bought with what amounts to real money.)  Meh.



Excellent! So it is a part of mainstream business thinking then ;)

A lot of ipad games I downloaded to try out are of the exact same nature. There is also an additional twist of time for money. You play too many rounds and your energy drops to zero and now you decide whether to wait a whole hour to replenish the power before another round or to purchase power with credit card and instantly play again for instant gratification. Someone must have systematically studied gaming and human behavior to have come to this.  I wonder what genius invented this entire business model.

I predict (I pretend I could do a lot of things of course) the next biggest thing would be materializing your virtual reality status into real-world artifacts you can only order with real money when you gain certain virtual status online. Then you see people carrying these artifacts as if they were "worthy members of the society" like those that drive expensive cars and wear expensive watches or clothing and handbags. Say a Jedi master level 9 ring for $50 with cheap plastic and rfid inside so gamestop or other game center/participating store people can properly greet you, so can other addicts. Or maybe 100K tweet followers gold chain that is twice as expensive as a regular gold chain without tweet but equal amount of gold. Youtube would offer you some instant fame such as best 1,000 videos on 5/16/2012 with a stupid or silly viral video for a fee of course, or the reverse, offer to instant fame your video for a day for a ridiculous fee and then sell you a memorabilia for the fame you bought for more profit. I can even give it a name since I "predict it", cyber-celebrities, cyces (pronounced si-si-s). I hope this was not too off topic or ridiculous. Gone too far?  :smiley-roll-sweat: :smiley-red:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 15, 2012, 11:54 pm

What exactly are we looking at?


I think it's a monster. Viewed from a different angle it has a face.

Quote
She has described their business model as "selling stuff to addicts."


Games have a bit of a bad rep, but really you are paying to be entertained, the same way you pay for a movie, a football game, or pay-TV. Or if you watch free-to-air TV you are "paying" by watching sponsors' ads, and presumably going out and buying their stuff.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on May 16, 2012, 12:48 am
Years ago, when I was very sick for several months, I played the MMO "Anarchy Online".  I was one of the first players that joined the game under "free play".  The idea was that free play characters couldn't be tricked out or levelled as well as paying accounts.

By the time I got sick of it, there were almost no paying account players that could touch my characters created on a free play account.  Why?  Because as a free play character, I had to grind every level, make spreadsheets to figure out how to get two extra "strength" points or what have you to get on the next level of super armor, etc.  I learned every aspect of the game inside and out.  When I would "farm credits", I would make in a single hour what most players took months to make.  One of my characters had three of the four most sought after artifacts in the game, and my guild (all free players) "owned" roughly 10% of the planet's geographic control areas.

For quite some time, there were players demanding I be banned.  For outplaying them.  Now, it's important to note that though I did it, the time investment was literally hundreds of hours.  I was laid up in bed for five months essentially.  That's a lot of levelling time.

Eventually, I sold many of the most valuable items via a vendor, making several hundred dollars in the process.  The accounts and characters still exist and I load them from time to time.. just to walk around the common areas in "Grid Armor Mk IV" on a free player.. armor that is worth $300 in real money on gaming sites at the time....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on May 16, 2012, 01:12 am
Quote
I wonder what genius invented this entire business model.

Cigarette companies, I think.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: madworm on May 17, 2012, 07:07 pm
What do you guys think about these KIS-3R33S (http://www.ebay.com/itm/15x-New-DC-DC-step-down-power-MP2307-module-KIS-3R33S-3A-4-75v-23v-100m-/251040278032?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3a732aa610) modules that have popped up on ebay?

DC/DC buck converter module, up to 3A. Input voltage up to 23V (24 would have been nice). These modules seem to be used / refurbished. But for about 50¢ a pop one can't really complain. They seem to require a bit of hacking, trimmer pot and 2 caps to get going. Still quite cheap I think.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: beige on May 17, 2012, 11:10 pm
5 SN75HVD3082E RS485 transceivers
7 LM2940CT regulators
10 36pin lengths of pin header
10 MCP4231 digital pots
10 ATMega328
5 MSP430G2231

all of which cost far too much, especially as I only was only going to buy the 10 ATMegas :smiley-red:

happens every time...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: robtillaart on May 20, 2012, 09:57 am

not really my latest perchase (that was an ice cream) but recently I bought a good book about C++ programming. Well written.

- http://www.amazon.com/Computer-Programming-Introduction-Scientifically-Inclined/dp/9081278819 -
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jun 01, 2012, 09:13 am
ATXMEGA32A4AU:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399p.jpg)

I was planning to shove it into here for prototyping:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399q.jpg)

But as you can see I didn't quite read the datasheet properly:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399r.jpg)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Jun 01, 2012, 09:23 am

Bummer!  Sometimes size does matter!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Jun 01, 2012, 10:09 am
Scored a 2nd hand Hero Gopro!
First time I've ever had to rinse my camera under a tap when I got home!
(http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=4003232568904&set=o.290239987694165&type=3)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0l6dwaibzuo
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woJpisbWP_4
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Jun 01, 2012, 04:34 pm
I live in the sticks in Arizona, USA, remind me again, what are those white things in the sky??  And, where did the water come from??  It looked like it fell from the sky !  Your roads look a lot like mine, but you don't have nearly as many great big rocks.

Thank goodness they make 4x4 vehicles for folks like us, but get on the right side of the road before the cops see you.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Jun 01, 2012, 05:27 pm
lol!!!!

the council just sent the grader through, it's almost "smooth" now!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jun 02, 2012, 09:07 pm
mac performa 430 for a buck
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Jun 05, 2012, 12:36 am
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/5M-Non-Waterproof-RGB-5050-SMD-Flexible-LED-Stnrips-Lights-300leds-DC12V-Indoor-/00/s/NDc2WDY4OQ==/$(KGrHqJHJCoE-0IWW1CHBPyT95g25Q~~60_12.JPG)

5m LED strip, RGB, 24 watts per color.  $14.50 shipped.  They have resistors built in, so constant current driver isn't needed.. just pump em 12v.  I've got a bunch of logic MOSFETs that ought to work great.  I am thinking of using an ATTINY and see how that goes.. no need to commit a 328 to what amounts to color blending and switching... I've talked the wifey into letting me redo the main lighting in the living room.. I have exposed beams, so I am planning to mount to the beam and act as a wall wash instead of direct lighting.  Should soften the light a bit and avoid shadows.  I'll then add several 10w warm whites.  I'll have balanced chromatic light that I'll be able to fiddle with easily..

Also nabbed an SD card module...got a five pack of 32k EPROMS for ten cents, shipped, just cuz I could... lol

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Jun 05, 2012, 01:08 am
Bought a 3D print at Shapeways.com - just a tiny test shape. The picture shows the same shape done on the now rather old MendelRepRap at the club, and another done on a friends Ultramaker. You may guess which is which :) Price info:
500$ machine
20¢2000$ machine
10$ plus shipping50000(?)$ machine

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wortelsoft on Jun 24, 2012, 11:03 am
Did some ebay shopping again:
bunch of capacitors: 100uF
test wires with female header connectors
Dual H Bridge DC Stepper Motor Drive Controller Module Board Arduino L298N

http://www.ebaypa.com/albums/20120002/sku030020_1.jpg

Finally after a long time I should get my 4 wheel robot driving. I've been away from the forum for a while as I sold my house and moved to another.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 21, 2012, 02:06 am
Got 20 USB-B-S-RA plugs, the same kind as used on my UNO board, for 54 cents each. I won't run out soon. One of the hangups I've had about V-USB projects is the connect. These are clean and cheap.

Got 4 328P-PU's for $2.06 ea and a set of male to female jumper wires and some header pins, just to fill out enough to justify the shipping.

And of course days later I come up with need for female 15-pin 2-row d-sub connectors, got a buddy with old CH pedals and no midi/gameport in his PC. Ain't that the way?

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Jul 21, 2012, 05:06 am
Lets see, the latest thing I bought was the Video Experimenter Arduino Compatible Shield from Nootropic design (http://nootropicdesign.com/ve/ (http://nootropicdesign.com/ve/)).  My plans are to merge the video out that I do with my steampunk camera with the arduino doing shutter release and perhaps using a servo to zoom the lens.  It was just mailed today, so I haven't gotten it yet.

Before that, I bought some protoshields and small breadboards from yourduino.com (http://arduino-direct.com/sunshop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=93 (http://arduino-direct.com/sunshop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=93)), with the idea that unlike my bigger breadboard, I can keep everything on the shield and take it off when I switch projects, instead of having to rewire the connections.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Jul 21, 2012, 02:26 pm
I didn't buy it but..
internation rectifier finally sent me a free power mosfet sample kit, took so long I completely forgot about it, but now I got some nice assortment of free mosfets XD
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jul 21, 2012, 06:37 pm
yea I just got mine a couple days ago, theres some nice parts in there
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Jul 21, 2012, 09:17 pm
A couple of weekends ago, after I had accepted a new software development position (yay - I have a job again!) - I went to my favorite electronics junkyard and picked up eight gear motors that were meant to actuate valves for a Jacuzzi spa. They run on twelve volts. The gearboxes are made of plastic, so they aren't super robust. The output "shaft" (it really is a hollow tube that is meant to be mounted on a square valve stem, I think) has a protrusion that actuates a micro-switch (probably meant to tell the Jacuzzi controller "open" vs "closed"). I haven't been able to stall the motor by hand, but running it barely pulls 400 mA, and loaded maybe 600 mA. Not a bad set of gear motors; I paid $4.00 each for them...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Jul 21, 2012, 09:22 pm
Four Dollars???  Do they look like this:
(http://www.inyopools.com/images/intermatic_pe24va.gif?format=jpg&scale=both&mode=pad&anchor=middlecenter&width=200&height=200)

If they do, this is one heck of a find!!  They are made to turn a valve that controls high volumes of water and cost tons more than what you paid (100+).  I may be going down there to buy them out of the things.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Jul 21, 2012, 10:35 pm
internation rectifier finally sent me a free power mosfet sample kit, took so long I completely forgot about it, but now I got some nice assortment of free mosfets XD


My kit arrived Wednesday.  Did you get the fancy light blue pouch?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jul 21, 2012, 11:08 pm
I did, though not as fancy as the vinyl checkbook cover like books I got with some cap samples 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Jul 22, 2012, 02:23 am
Yep, now I need to find a use for a 2x2qfn mosfet lol
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Jul 22, 2012, 11:04 am

Four Dollars???  Do they look like this:
(http://www.inyopools.com/images/intermatic_pe24va.gif?format=jpg&scale=both&mode=pad&anchor=middlecenter&width=200&height=200)

If they do, this is one heck of a find!!  They are made to turn a valve that controls high volumes of water and cost tons more than what you paid (100+).  I may be going down there to buy them out of the things.


No - they didn't look like that; though that might be a "complete" unit, whereas what I bought might be "inside" that case (I only got the gear motor - not that valves themselves). They were all hooked up to a controller that said Jacuzzi on it.

They were outside, in a tangled mess of a box. Wires and junk everywhere. There was only the eight; there weren't any others, as far as I could see...sorry.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Jul 23, 2012, 05:36 pm
My wife really likes the LED wall wash lighting, so I bought another spool.  Five meters of RGB LED's, has built in current limit resistance.  300 LED's, common anode, with adhesive backing.  Got this reel for just over ten bucks, the first one cost about eighteen.  Bottom feeding takes patience, but if you are willing to trade ten hours of search for a two dollar savings, you can get amazing deals at times.  Twenty four watts per color for a total of seventy two watts of chromatic-tunable lighting.  Now I'll have twice that, which should be enough to use as the primary lighting in the living room.  Using a salvaged ATX power supply for power, and fading with MOSFETs driven by Arduino code running on an ATMEGA8.

Also came across something I could not resist-  a 405nm deep violet/near UV laser.  Been playing with fluorescence and that 3 watt UV LED I picked up a while back (quinine fluorescence in tonic water is an interesting light spread, as is Ethylene Glycol.  trying to come up with something interesting to do with it photographically).  It's only going to increase the flexibility and prime the ideas more to have a laser at that frequency also-- fiddling with fluorescence with a laser is going to be amusing I hope... since it was four bucks for the module @10 mw, I stretched the toy budget to fit it in.  

Lastly, a little bird gave me an Allen Bradley 1771-OB DC Output Module.  12-24v rated, looks like some pretty decent power transistors but havin't looked them up yet.  Is there any reason I should NOT just strip the board for parts?  As it's some kid of backplane bus, I doubt it's got much practical use to me as-is...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jul 24, 2012, 07:20 pm
Got a few 128 position optical encoders from a guy on eBay for $17 each, new.  These are $80 new from normal suppliers.

http://www.newark.com/bourns/ens1j-b28-l00128l/optical-encoder/dp/62K3108

3000rpm, 200,000,000 revolution lifetime, minimum. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Jul 24, 2012, 07:31 pm
Order yesterday, rerelease of a 27 year old design -

(http://www.tamiyausa.com/images/product/250/58525/header_58525_01.jpg)

No plans to add Arduino functionality - yet other than some sort of a camera trigger to try and get some decent actions pictures like the stills through out this guys video -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPdC6I7FfYI (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPdC6I7FfYI)

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com (http://rcarduino.blogspot.com)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jul 24, 2012, 10:02 pm

Order yesterday, rerelease of a 27 year old design -

(http://www.tamiyausa.com/images/product/250/58525/header_58525_01.jpg)

No plans to add Arduino functionality - yet other than some sort of a camera trigger to try and get some decent actions pictures like the stills through out this guys video -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPdC6I7FfYI (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nPdC6I7FfYI)

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com (http://rcarduino.blogspot.com)



I think you have us all beat.  Delivery cost to the UAE must be killer.  It is made in a foreign country, I assume...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Jul 25, 2012, 08:39 am
It's definitley one of the nicest RC Car designs, they used to try and make them look realistic 20-30 years ago so there is a fairly big market for these vintage re releases.

I already have the sand scorcher which is the other model in the video, thats an even older design. I went for a rusty/vintage look but bought a spare bodyshell to do something a bit more glossy with.

Rust effect
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-PK5DuEBa4T8/TxFEbUCM4tI/AAAAAAAAAMQ/veYjdiA4E9M/s320/heap_a10.jpg)

Close up
(http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-gE6OJXJBCY8/TxFEUX7n3xI/AAAAAAAAAMI/f3D_a5gTBUA/s320/heap_r10.jpg)

I really like the period metal flake paint on the buggy in the video and will probably aim for something equally period on my build.

As for costs we order from Hong Kong as a club so get bulk discount and share the shipping cost so its not too expensive.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com (http://rcarduino.blogspot.com)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jul 25, 2012, 07:53 pm
Oh, you had me fooled.  I thought you ordered a real dune buggy (I would love one of those!).  In the UAE I bet one of those would be really cool to get out in the desert.  It's a high end RC dune buggy.  Still, very nice.  I don't do RC anymore but I intend to get back there someday.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Jul 25, 2012, 08:03 pm
Maybe it's both.  Awesome practical joke.  The steering and controls in the car aren't connected to anything.. the driver gets in and buckles up, thinking he's going for a DRIVE... but guess what buddy, you is going for what we calls a RIDE.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Jul 25, 2012, 08:37 pm
Quote
Maybe it's both.  Awesome practical joke.  The steering and controls in the car aren't connected to anything.. the driver gets in and buckles up, thinking he's going for a DRIVE... but guess what buddy, you is going for what we calls a RIDE.


Punk'd
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dannable on Jul 25, 2012, 08:57 pm
The motorway I take to work was closed for most of the day so I found myself on eBay and bought these:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/External-Active-GPS-Antenna-Marine-with-2-Receiver-Modules-for-Arduino-Project-/130699095890?pt=UK_Computing_Other_Computing_Networking&hash=item1e6e45ef52 (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/External-Active-GPS-Antenna-Marine-with-2-Receiver-Modules-for-Arduino-Project-/130699095890?pt=UK_Computing_Other_Computing_Networking&hash=item1e6e45ef52)

I have no idea what I'm going to do with them. At least if I do get them working then if some tells me to get lost I can always tell them I can't....

David.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jul 28, 2012, 01:35 am
Though I didnt purchace it, it was given to me by a rep I am a new tinkerer of a Cypress PSoC3, which is kind of like if a 8051 and a fpga had a baby
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Aug 15, 2012, 02:01 am
For 40 bucks and a little computer repair I got a vortex86 board

800Mhz x86 based SBC with
256 Mb ram with a laptop dimm socket for more
VGA
LVDS LCD interface
ISA breakout
PCI breakout
Compact Flash socket
Dual PS/2, laptop style need a Y adapter (have a Y adapter)
Dual IDE ports
Floppy port
Parallel port
10/100 Base T port
8*RS232 ports
4*USB 2.0 Ports
16 Bit GPIO port

runs DOS though XP, all on a 5 volt input, sucks less than an amp fully loaded down

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 15, 2012, 03:52 am
Sounds neat! Some real muscle and memory! Is that a PIII or mobile CPU?
DOS/XP... how soon before it runs Linux too?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Aug 15, 2012, 04:19 am
My last "purchase" was to help fund this:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1523379957/oculus-rift-step-into-the-game

...yeah, I went for a dev kit. Here's hoping I get it!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Aug 15, 2012, 04:26 am

For 40 bucks and a little computer repair I got a vortex86 board


That's a pretty sweet deal - how did you happen upon it?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Aug 15, 2012, 04:47 am

Sounds neat! Some real muscle and memory! Is that a PIII or mobile CPU?
DOS/XP... how soon before it runs Linux too?

FWIW, I have an older laptop (Dell D620) with an Intel graphics chip (945GM).  Unfortunately, Gnome3 which came out in Fedora 15 does not work too well with the graphics chip, since it doesn't have the support for the (useless to me) 3D eye-candy that Gnome3 uses.  This means for the time being I'm locked at Fedora 14, until I reinstall a different distro (or otherwise deal with the incompatibility).

One consequence is I'm locked into version 0.22 until I deal with the Arduino incompatiblities with rxdx and avrdude.

So hopefully you won't have those issues.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Aug 15, 2012, 04:50 am

My last "purchase" was to help fund this:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1523379957/oculus-rift-step-into-the-game

...yeah, I went for a dev kit. Here's hoping I get it!

In terms of kickstarter projects, I funded two projects I hope to use with my Arduino:



In particular, I hope to have one of the servo fingers act as a camera shutter release.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Aug 15, 2012, 06:33 am
Quote from: GoForSmoke

Sounds neat! Some real muscle and memory! Is that a PIII or mobile CPU?
DOS/XP... how soon before it runs Linux too?


its a i586 based core, and it runs linux fine as long as you have a pre i686 kernel (which is everywhere) You are not going to be able to watch "Avatar" in 1080P with it, but it does pack a punch, its faster than the 850Mhz PIII pizza box in my closet, but DDR2 ram and a video system IN the CPU package does help.

Quote from: cr0sh

That's a pretty sweet deal - how did you happen upon it?


sweet talkin at work, we have a BUNCH of OLD computers that run our old relay lines, guess who knows how to fix them all off the top of their head? So while cleaning house I got an offer I couldn't refuse.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Aug 16, 2012, 12:26 am

Unfortunately, Gnome3 which came out in Fedora 15 does not work too well with the graphics chip, since it doesn't have the support for the (useless to me) 3D eye-candy that Gnome3 uses.  This means for the time being I'm locked at Fedora 14, until I reinstall a different distro (or otherwise deal with the incompatibility).

One consequence is I'm locked into version 0.22 until I deal with the Arduino incompatiblities with rxdx and avrdude.


I haven't put it on my main machine yet, but Linux Mint LXDE (http://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=87) runs nicely on my old decrepit laptop. IIRC it uses Fluxbox as the WM. You'll still have Gnome libraries, but I think you can turn off the 3D crap, if it's still an issue. I'm at Mint v11, and 13 is already out. Just too lazy to upgrade, and I don't use my laptop much anyway.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Aug 16, 2012, 12:38 am

I haven't put it on my main machine yet, but Linux Mint LXDE (http://www.linuxmint.com/edition.php?id=87) runs nicely on my old decrepit laptop. IIRC it uses Fluxbox as the WM. You'll still have Gnome libraries, but I think you can turn off the 3D crap, if it's still an issue. I'm at Mint v11, and 13 is already out. Just too lazy to upgrade, and I don't use my laptop much anyway.

Thanks.  I downloaded the LXDE and FXDE Fedora 17 spins last night.  I did a trial install last night.  Evidently, they bumped up the user UID/GID range, and I need to change my UID/GID on the user from 500 to 1000.  Due to the number of Fedora specific hacks/configurations that I've used over the years, I want to stay with Fedora for the time being.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Aug 16, 2012, 05:35 am
not to start one of those wars but LXDE is rubbish, use XFCE (which I assume you meant when you posted XFDE) every single annoyance in LXDE (and there are a big ole pile of them) is corrected in XFCE, and if your wanting a middle weight desktop (compared to ICEWM or something) its just one less pain in the ass

Quote
IIRC it uses Fluxbox as the WM.


no is uses LXDE, hince the name  ]:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: RanTalbott on Aug 16, 2012, 09:47 am

Evidently, they bumped up the user UID/GID range, and I need to change my UID/GID on the user from 500 to 1000.

Nah. Maybe someday, but not yet. I ran into this a few years ago, when I switched to Ubuntu. I had a few existing systems with a 501 UID and GID that used to be the default many years ago, and didn't want to mess with changing them.

So I just supplied a dummy name when the installer created the "ordinary user", and added myself manually as 501:501 after the install. So all my systems are still in sync, which is handy because I do a lot of NFS mounts to share data between systems.

I think the plan is that eventually the 500-999 range of IDs will be assigned to system functions like the lower ones, but it hasn't happened yet.  And might never: if the architects are smart, they'll leave the first few unassigned to accomodate all the legacy single-user systems.

The installer will automatically add your dummy user to several groups to give it access to various system resources (typically including the presumed modem port, CD drive, etc).  Be sure to do a "grep dummy_username /etc/group" so you'll know which ones to add yourself to.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Aug 17, 2012, 01:47 am

not to start one of those wars but LXDE is rubbish, use XFCE (which I assume you meant when you posted XFDE) every single annoyance in LXDE (and there are a big ole pile of them) is corrected in XFCE, and if your wanting a middle weight desktop (compared to ICEWM or something) its just one less pain in the ass

Quote
IIRC it uses Fluxbox as the WM.


no is uses LXDE, hince the name  ]:D


Hmmm. I wonder where I got that? Well, something I was trying out recently used it.  :P ...

Oooooh! Eureka! It uses Openbox (http://wiki.lxde.org/en/Openbox). I wasn't too far off then. See, the Desktop Environment isn' t the same as the Window Manager. For example, don't know what it uses now, but Gnome used to use Metacity, and before that, Sawfish. You can run, with varying degrees of success/frustration, many different WMs in Gnome, or KDE for that matter.

Speaking of lightweight, here on the home desktop machine, I run Fvwm, with no DE at all. Yeah, I run some Gnome apps, so I have Fvwm fire up gnome-session when it starts. Used to be you didn't have to do that either, and you could still run Gnome or pure GTK apps. I miss those days. Now, yeah, you can fire up a Gnome app without gnome-session running, but it won't pick up all the settings. Well, I could turn this into a big rant, but I won't. :)

Last time I tried XFCE I hated it. But, horses for courses, as they say over in left-pondia. I find nothing objectionable about LXDE so far. But then I don't use that laptop as anything but a testbed.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 21, 2012, 05:29 pm
My 25 protoboards came in.

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/double-sided-glass-fiber-prototyping-pcb-universal-board-3-x-7-5-piece-pack-131730

They're bigger than I thought, 5 to a set in small ziplock bags, with bulk rate shipping still less than $4 a bag.


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Aug 21, 2012, 05:45 pm
One of these, I am a sucker for nicely designed musical toys -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jjp_31kbpY&feature=player_embedded (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jjp_31kbpY&feature=player_embedded)

Its Arduino based, opensource etc etc so I thought why not buy one and support them.

Duane B
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Aug 22, 2012, 01:24 am
My latest purchase is a 20-foot shipping container.

What has this to do with Arduino/electronics?

Well I plan to fit half of it out as a workshop so when we aren't travelling I have somewhere decent to make stuff. At least I'll have a workbench now.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Aug 23, 2012, 12:49 am

My latest purchase is a 20-foot shipping container.

What has this to do with Arduino/electronics?

Well I plan to fit half of it out as a workshop so when we aren't travelling I have somewhere decent to make stuff. At least I'll have a workbench now.

______
Rob


Where did you get that, eBay?  What was the shipping cost?  What did they ship it in, a 21-foot shipping container?  :smiley-mr-green:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Aug 23, 2012, 12:52 am
I like it. How about ordering some air, and asking for it to be shipped in a 20-foot shipping container?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Aug 23, 2012, 03:03 am
"don't open up the cabin hatch,
  the air is sure to leave it.
Air is very hard to catch,
  you never will retrieve it!"

(Frank Hayes)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 23, 2012, 07:18 am
We have stripped-down low-price grocery stores here where you -can- buy empty shopping bags.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Aug 23, 2012, 08:07 am
Quote
What did they ship it in, a 21-foot shipping container?

Yes it begs the question, what do they ship shipping containers in.

Quote
How about ordering some air, and asking for it to be shipped in a 20-foot shipping container?

We also got a 24,000ltr water tank, I was hoping to order it pre-filled to save on a second delivery but they wouldn't come at that :)

_______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: frank26080115 on Aug 23, 2012, 09:08 am

My latest purchase is a 20-foot shipping container.

What has this to do with Arduino/electronics?

Well I plan to fit half of it out as a workshop so when we aren't travelling I have somewhere decent to make stuff. At least I'll have a workbench now.

______
Rob


Mobile hackerspace? I'd support something like that.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Aug 23, 2012, 10:31 am
You want mobile hackerspace, have a look at my truck :)

http://robgray.com/graynomad/wothahellizat/wot2/photos/index.php (http://robgray.com/graynomad/wothahellizat/wot2/photos/index.php)

The container is for when we drop anchor on our land.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: E40racer on Aug 23, 2012, 10:10 pm
Came back from a 4 week vacation and found these items:
10 PCB's from Seeedstudio, simple board for the ATmega1284P-PU http://www.bajdi.com/bajduino-1284/bajduino-1284-3/
Finally received my Raspberry Pi with some accessories (USB power adapter, HDMI cable, HDMI-DVI converter).
Cheap USBasp v2.0 (bought on Ebay)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Aug 23, 2012, 10:17 pm

You want mobile hackerspace, have a look at my truck :)

http://robgray.com/graynomad/wothahellizat/wot2/photos/index.php (http://robgray.com/graynomad/wothahellizat/wot2/photos/index.php)

The container is for when we drop anchor on our land.

______
Rob

that looks like fun XD
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Aug 24, 2012, 05:59 pm

You want mobile hackerspace, have a look at my truck :)

Oooohh .... nice. A normal car driving license isn't enough, I presume.

Where is the Arduino?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Aug 25, 2012, 12:49 am
Quote
A normal car driving license isn't enough, I presume.

Nope, you need what is called over here an HR (Heavy Rigid) licence.

Quote
Where is the Arduino?

There are a couple in there, but they are just for tinkering and have no permanent function. I've been designing a monitoring and control network for it for about 3 years now but I keep getting distracted by other projects :)

I did finish a digital speedo for it using a Mega644 but not with Arduino code.

I'm about to add 1200W of solar panels, maybe I'll do something to monitor them.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 15, 2012, 05:45 am
Not exactly a purchase, but a forum member made this up from my design for an I2C graphical LCD expander thing:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/I2C_LDC_backpack3.jpg)




Original design:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Graphical%20LCD.jpg)

My own expander board:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Graphical_LCD3.png)

Now compare to this:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/I2C_LDC_backpack1.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Sep 15, 2012, 07:31 am
MAX232's

its quite amusing, on digikey the maxim SOIC chips are 3.86 EACH

the TI version is 56 cents EACH

give you a guess which ones I bought
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: John_Smith on Sep 15, 2012, 07:55 am
Thats a neat idea Nick !  literally .
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Sep 16, 2012, 11:14 pm
Just ordered a Panavise PCB holder (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000SSR8FY/).

Guess that means I need to make something one of these days. :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Sep 17, 2012, 12:15 am

Just ordered a Panavise PCB holder (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000SSR8FY/).

Guess that means I need to make something one of these days. :)

That is for a 30cm wide board. That is a lot of soldering.  :smiley-eek:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Sep 17, 2012, 12:34 am


Just ordered a Panavise PCB holder (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000SSR8FY/).

Guess that means I need to make something one of these days. :)

That is for a 30cm wide board. That is a lot of soldering.  :smiley-eek:


The key phrase is '... up to'. Hey, nothing exceeds like excess, you know.  :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Sep 17, 2012, 07:09 am
Been away from the forum for most part of the summer :0

Bought a new car, the first new car in my life. So much technology.

Also got adafruit Sd card shield, screw shield, nunchuck plug, level shifter, rugged circuits QuadRam, and motor shield. Might be useful for future projects/contract work :)

Graynomad, having seen your truck photo makes me want something like that too. I don't think my apartment complex garage is tall enough for your truck. Maybe in the future, when I don't worry about things most people worry about, I can get a large vehicle, mod it to my need, and have an adventure, or just park in the woods.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 17, 2012, 09:11 am

Bought a new car, the first new car in my life. So much technology.


You don't drive cars any more. You make suggestions to it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Sep 17, 2012, 09:53 am
My car regularly reboots while I am driving, I lose power steering, brake servos, engine power, lights, everything. It usually restarts within a minute, but thats enough to kill you if you stall mid junction.

Duane.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Sep 17, 2012, 12:27 pm


Bought a new car, the first new car in my life. So much technology.


You don't drive cars any more. You make suggestions to it.


Some cars seem to require a texting cellphone as the suggestion interface.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 17, 2012, 12:44 pm

My car regularly reboots while I am driving


Aye, that's Windows for you!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Sep 17, 2012, 02:28 pm

Graynomad, having seen your truck photo makes me want something like that too. I don't think my apartment complex garage is tall enough for your truck. Maybe in the future, when I don't worry about things most people worry about, I can get a large vehicle, mod it to my need, and have an adventure, or just park in the woods.

Seeing your note to Graynomad, it reminds of this article that went around facebook recently, of a company that was wanting to ship specialized kilns to Kenya that would allow the farmers to deal with all of the excess organic debris from their sugarcane crop without burning the stalks and return it as fertilizer.  Hower the cost of making the kiln  1/2 way around the world and the resultant shipping added to the carbon footprint and was rather costly.  So instead they fashioned an off-the-grid factory that fits in a shipping container to allow the Kenyans to make the kilns themselves.  http://gizmodo.com/5942294/the-next-industrial-revolution-starts-in-a-20+foot-shipping-container (http://gizmodo.com/5942294/the-next-industrial-revolution-starts-in-a-20+foot-shipping-container)

Here is what the shop in a box has:

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Sep 17, 2012, 03:06 pm
That was some heartwarming news. Something that actually keeps on giving, instead of requiring expensive parts/labour from the "generous" western countries.

The webpage says: "for $50,000, you can buy one directly from the designers" That seems like a steal, I think the price is only valid if resident in non-city regions of Africa. 8)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Sep 17, 2012, 04:15 pm
Quote
Graynomad, having seen your truck photo makes me want something like that too.

It takes quite a leap of faith to sell everything, but I reckon it's worth it. You have to be the nomadic type though, it's not for everyone. We have almost no mail, get a delivery 3-4 times a year and apart from a couple of vehicle registration stickers we throw it out.

Quote
I don't think my apartment complex garage is tall enough for your truck.

You'll need about 3.5m :)

Quote
and have an adventure, or just park in the woods.

We mostly just park in the woods, typically we find a nice spot and sit there for 3-6 weeks then move on. With the exception of a few national parks and a couple of show grounds we haven't paid for accommodation in 10 years. We're self sufficient for ages with food, two months with water and indefinitely for power.

All that said I'm enjoying setting up a bit of a base at present, two shipping containers and our truck, that's more than enough space for two people. I wouldn't know what to do with a house these days.

@MichaelMeissner
I love that. Off-grid is not cheap but it does work. I built Wothahellizat Mk2 at a location with only solar power (and the occasional generator for the 3-phase welding of large parts like chassis mounts etc). It's getting cheaper though, I just bought 4x250W panels for $249 each, that's < $1 a watt, 10x cheaper than my first panels 12 years ago.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: John_Smith on Sep 17, 2012, 04:25 pm
Quote
"for $50,000, you can buy one directly from the designers" That seems like a steal, I think the price is only valid if resident in non-city regions of Africa. smiley-cool


Its not such a steal here,      dont forget that $50,000 here in Africa could buy you a house !  or 10,000 restaurant pizzas !  or 14,000 quaffable bottles of wine.

but I drool at the inventory of the container, and think the idea is noble.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Sep 17, 2012, 05:38 pm

My car regularly reboots while I am driving, I lose power steering, brake servos, engine power, lights, everything. It usually restarts within a minute, but thats enough to kill you if you stall mid junction.

Duane.


At least you have power steering or manual steering when power goes out. My steering wheel is nothing more than a game setup. There is no mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the actual steering. If I lose power, it won't make a difference whether I'm holding the steering wheel or a "steering wheel" in a kid's coin-operated rocking "car". I don't know about the brakes. At least I didn't buy a car that overrides brakes. If you don't mind, what kind of car are you driving (not to start a feud)?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wizdum on Sep 17, 2012, 11:40 pm


My car regularly reboots while I am driving, I lose power steering, brake servos, engine power, lights, everything. It usually restarts within a minute, but thats enough to kill you if you stall mid junction.

Duane.


At least you have power steering or manual steering when power goes out. My steering wheel is nothing more than a game setup. There is no mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the actual steering. If I lose power, it won't make a difference whether I'm holding the steering wheel or a "steering wheel" in a kid's coin-operated rocking "car". I don't know about the brakes. At least I didn't buy a car that overrides brakes. If you don't mind, what kind of car are you driving (not to start a feud)?



I'm going to drive my 87 S10 until I die. I have lived through far too many vehicle system failures to trust a system where I don't have at least some control.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Sep 18, 2012, 12:06 am

There is no mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the actual steering.


Madness! Madness, I say! ]:)

Do tell what make/model this is, so that I can put it on my list of vehicles to avoid -- both buying one in the 1st place, and watching out for them in traffic! :P
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Sep 18, 2012, 01:42 am


There is no mechanical connection between the steering wheel and the actual steering.


Madness! Madness, I say! ]:)

Do tell what make/model this is, so that I can put it on my list of vehicles to avoid -- both buying one in the 1st place, and watching out for them in traffic! :P


To prevent feuding over brands, I will say I bought the 2013 model of one of the following, all of which I test drove and thry share the electric steering feature:

Chevy malibu
Nissan altima
Subaru Legacy
Kia optima

The list goes on for newer cars with electric steering. Some have better force feedback than others, but all are electric. No mechanical links. I was wondering why most of these medium price mid size sedans now offer telescopic steering wheels. must be dead easy to make that with electric steering.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Sep 18, 2012, 01:54 am
And to think I always baulked at buying a car with both central locking AND electric windows in case it wouldn't let me out one day :)

3-4 years ago I swapped my 1984 Landcruiser for a new Suzuki Jimny. The Jimny is nice but even the lowest optioned model has stuff I can't fix. I'm seriously considering going back to an old-model vehicle.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: sbright33 on Sep 18, 2012, 02:09 am
I too bought a shipping container...  20+ years ago for $500 like new.  Time for another it's getting rusty!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Sep 18, 2012, 02:45 am
Quote
Time for another it's getting rusty!

I just spent $3500, ouch, but  that is a good price for where I am. It's what they call a "new build", meaning that it's only been used once. It's just like new.

It's quite common for them to be left at the destination these days and those destinations are normally the western countries. It's cheaper to build a new one in China than get the old one back.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Sep 18, 2012, 06:41 am
Maybe I should get one to put my car in and pretend its been stolen !

My guess is that the problem with my car is wiring not software, and thats a really big problem because its just not economical to strip out the entire wiring loom to fix the problem so the garage will just keep replacing modules until the problem goes away - most likley through me getting killed.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com (http://rcarduino.blogspot.com)



Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Sep 18, 2012, 07:08 am

dont forget that $50,000 here in Africa could buy you a house !


heck 50,000$ here in Tennessee can buy you a house with a acre of land (it wont be an awesome house, but its better than the apartment I live in now)

steal? not in my mind
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jimmy60 on Sep 18, 2012, 06:45 pm
Chevy malibu
Nissan altima
Subaru Legacy
Kia optima


I think you've confused electric power steering with steer by wire. None of those cars are steer by wire. As far as I know no one sells a consumer vehicle with steer by wire, yet. It's in some things like forklifts and tractors. It's certainly being worked on.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Sep 18, 2012, 07:09 pm

Chevy malibu
Nissan altima
Subaru Legacy
Kia optima


I think you've confused electric power steering with steer by wire. None of those cars are steer by wire. As far as I know no one sells a consumer vehicle with steer by wire, yet. It's in some things like forklifts and tractors. It's certainly being worked on.


That was my first thought also. Electric power steering meant to me that the power assist pump was an electric pump rather then a fan belt driven pump, and if electric power failed you would still have mechanical unassisted steering control available, hard to steer but still possible.

But the poster was pretty clear about what he meant by no mechanical attachement from the steering wheel to the steering gear train, so who knows, it's the internet so it must to be true.  ;)

A total steer by wire would be pretty scary for me, I think I'm just too old to except that as a control method, where is the fall back ability for single point failures? Jet fighters with real fly by wire have lots of redundancy in the actuators and reserve power sources.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Sep 18, 2012, 07:29 pm
Quote
I think you've confused electric power steering with steer by wire. None of those cars are steer by wire. As far as I know no one sells a consumer vehicle with steer by wire, yet. It's in some things like forklifts and tractors. It's certainly being worked on.


I assumed from motoring shows on the TV which talk about 'sneeze' zones in the center of performance car steering that this must be implemented electrically rather than mechanically ? They also change the steering rate as the speed of the car changes, many cars also add four wheel steering which changes from opposition to complement at speed. I am not a mechanic or really a car enthusiast so may be totally wrong.

Anyway in my own car, I still have steering and brakes, but the steering is seriously heavy when the power cuts.

Duane B

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Sep 18, 2012, 08:59 pm
I stand corrected. Here is what I found for one of the vehicles:

Nissan chose an electrohydraulic power-steering setup in place of some of its competitors' fully electric systems, a best-of-both-worlds solution that provides the feel of a conventional hydraulic setup with the economy benefits of an electric rack. The decision pays dividends the second you start moving -- the steering communicates with the driver, loads up naturally, and suffers from minimal torque steer.

So yes the power steering is not going to work when power is out. I also suspect there is a program to translate the steering wheel turn into power on the electrohydraulic pump, and yes speed sensitive steering so a problem with that program may translate into spurious maneuvers. I was wrong thinking a motor moves the wheels. A pump does that.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Sep 18, 2012, 09:06 pm

I stand corrected. Here is what I found for one of the vehicles:

Nissan chose an electrohydraulic power-steering setup in place of some of its competitors' fully electric systems, a best-of-both-worlds solution that provides the feel of a conventional hydraulic setup with the economy benefits of an electric rack. The decision pays dividends the second you start moving -- the steering communicates with the driver, loads up naturally, and suffers from minimal torque steer.

So yes the power steering is not going to work when power is out. I also suspect there is a program to translate the steering wheel turn into power on the electrohydraulic pump, and yes speed sensitive steering so a problem with that program may translate into spurious maneuvers. I was wrong thinking a motor moves the wheels. A pump does that.


But more fundementally does that means that a failure of the pump in the Nissan would still allow 'armstrong' direct mechanical steering control for the driver?

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Sep 18, 2012, 09:54 pm


I stand corrected. Here is what I found for one of the vehicles:

Nissan chose an electrohydraulic power-steering setup in place of some of its competitors' fully electric systems, a best-of-both-worlds solution that provides the feel of a conventional hydraulic setup with the economy benefits of an electric rack. The decision pays dividends the second you start moving -- the steering communicates with the driver, loads up naturally, and suffers from minimal torque steer.

So yes the power steering is not going to work when power is out. I also suspect there is a program to translate the steering wheel turn into power on the electrohydraulic pump, and yes speed sensitive steering so a problem with that program may translate into spurious maneuvers. I was wrong thinking a motor moves the wheels. A pump does that.


But more fundementally does that means that a failure of the pump in the Nissan would still allow 'armstrong' direct mechanical steering control for the driver?

Lefty


I'm no mechanic but I doubt you can still turn because I think the pump is not mechanically attached to the wheel. The "other" cars mentioned in the internet blurb must be using electric motors instead of pumps to turn the wheel. That means you have to reach under your hood to spin that motor's rotor if you want to turn the wheels.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Sep 18, 2012, 10:57 pm



I stand corrected. Here is what I found for one of the vehicles:

Nissan chose an electrohydraulic power-steering setup in place of some of its competitors' fully electric systems, a best-of-both-worlds solution that provides the feel of a conventional hydraulic setup with the economy benefits of an electric rack. The decision pays dividends the second you start moving -- the steering communicates with the driver, loads up naturally, and suffers from minimal torque steer.

So yes the power steering is not going to work when power is out. I also suspect there is a program to translate the steering wheel turn into power on the electrohydraulic pump, and yes speed sensitive steering so a problem with that program may translate into spurious maneuvers. I was wrong thinking a motor moves the wheels. A pump does that.


But more fundementally does that means that a failure of the pump in the Nissan would still allow 'armstrong' direct mechanical steering control for the driver?

Lefty


I'm no mechanic but I doubt you can still turn because I think the pump is not mechanically attached to the wheel. The "other" cars mentioned in the internet blurb must be using electric motors instead of pumps to turn the wheel. That means you have to reach under your hood to spin that motor's rotor if you want to turn the wheels.


It doesn't sound like you have a good understanding on how even conventional power steering works. A pump's output can never be mechanically attached to anything as it's output is a fluid under pressure routed to something that can turn that fluid pressure back to a mechanical force. Standard power steering uses that method but still allows for manual steering even if the pump fails.

So still looking for a definitive answer with reference to any present consumer car uses true steer by wire only, where there is no driver manual (unassisted) steering available if primary power is lost?

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Sep 18, 2012, 11:49 pm
My understanding is very limited. I thought the steering column turns gears that turn the front wheels. The power steering pump gets input from the steering column turning and assists with hydraulics so the driver doesn't have to turn so hard. I will see if the last 25% of my car manual has any details.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Sep 19, 2012, 12:05 am

My understanding is very limited. I thought the steering column turns gears that turn the front wheels. The power steering pump gets input from the steering column turning and assists with hydraulics so the driver doesn't have to turn so hard. I will see if the last 25% of my car manual has any details.


Yes, that is how it works, and steering is still possible with the loss of hydraulic pressure, abet with much more steering force required. So just changing from a belt driven pump to a electric powered pump doesn't change anything significant. Nor would just having an electric motor geared to the steering rack and pinion change the basic concept. But a true steer-by-wire-only would have no pumps, just a motor driving the steering rack and pinion directly and there would be no mechanical connection from the steering wheel to the steering rack and pinion. Does such a steer-by-wire system actually exist in any present consumer auto, that is my question? A poster here said there is, another said several, a couple of us said REALLY!!!, not for me.  ;)

Just looking for source references to such a true steer by wire auto.

EDIT: Found this on wiki, seems true steer by wire only is not presently avalible but is often confused with
       electric powered steering.

Quote
Steer by wire

This is currently used in electric forklifts and stockpickers and some tractors.[1] Its implementation in road vehicles is limited by concerns over reliability although it has been demonstrated in several concept vehicles such as ThyssenKrupp Presta Steering's Mercedes-Benz Unimog, General Motors' Hy-wire and Sequel and the Mazda Ryuga. A rear wheel SbW system by Delphi called Quadrasteer is used on some pickup trucks but has had limited commercial success.
This is not to be confused with Electric Power Steering.


Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Sep 19, 2012, 02:01 am
Coming back to te original topic, how about three cheers for this SIM900 (http://campl.us/gOOdJd7Dja0) coming all the way from Taiwan, and having experienced nearly three weeks of happiness in US customs along the way. I wider where they store all the WIP at their rte of processing stuff.

Anyhow, on the GPRS board it goes if I find the time tonight. Note the classy 'antistatic' storage device. Hope it'll still work!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jimmy60 on Sep 19, 2012, 05:43 pm

My understanding is very limited. I thought the steering column turns gears that turn the front wheels. The power steering pump gets input from the steering column turning and assists with hydraulics so the driver doesn't have to turn so hard. I will see if the last 25% of my car manual has any details.


Actually, you turn the wheels.  XD

The steering wheel is attached to the steering column which has a pinion gear on the end which moves the rack (we're talking rack and pinion here). The rack pushes and pulls the spindles via the tie rod ends. Power steering simply boosts this and makes it easier. Electronic rack and pinion uses electric motors in the unit to help. Some use an electric pump to run a hydraulic boost system.

Your hands do have a mechanical connection to the wheels.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyclegadget on Sep 19, 2012, 06:25 pm

Coming back to te original topic, how about three cheers for this SIM900 (http://campl.us/gOOdJd7Dja0) coming all the way from Taiwan, and having experienced nearly three weeks of happiness in US customs along the way.


Did you find a good deal at an overseas location? Where and how much did it cost?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Sep 19, 2012, 06:27 pm
A couple of joints are in there also to help ensure that the steering wheel does not spear you during a frontal impact. I.e. the Steering system is designed to collapse inside the front (typically motor) space of the car instead of allowing itself to be pushed into the occupied space as the front axle moves backward during impact. Apparently lots of people in the past were speared by the steering wheel, hence the need for seat belts and the development of air bags.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Sep 19, 2012, 06:30 pm

Did you find a good deal at an overseas location? Where and how much did it cost?


A better way to put it was that I was able to find the chip at all. No US distributor I looked at carried it. Not Digikey, Newark, or Mouser. So I E-bay'ed it from Taiwan for about $20. Are you aware of SimCom distributors in the US that sell to civilians?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyclegadget on Sep 19, 2012, 06:33 pm

Here you go! http://www.mdfly.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=8_51&products_id=939

and here with a phone call: http://www.kowatec.com/prod/sim/products.php?i=9xx

I have not bought from those two sources but, I had researched the SIM900 stuff a little.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Sep 19, 2012, 06:34 pm
Quote
A couple of joints are in there also to help ensure that the steering wheel does not spear you during a frontal impact.


Hopefully I won't have to find any of this out, just picked up my car.

Duane B

rcarduino.blogspot.com (http://rcarduino.blogspot.com)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: ChipperJones on Sep 19, 2012, 11:18 pm
I just got this Noise Hush N780 (http://www.wirelessground.com/noisehush-n780-bluetooth-headset.html) mono headset for all the camping trips i do in cod!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Sep 20, 2012, 12:16 am
Here you go!


You are amazing. I wish I had known about either source. Much less waiting and the price is similar.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Oct 02, 2012, 02:25 am
Look at what arrived, all within the last few "business days" (one on thursday, one on friday, one on monday, I think.)
(http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8310/8045338858_ab7c4573eb.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/58843278@N00/8045338858/)
(more pictures at the flickr page...)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Oct 02, 2012, 02:34 am
Now what are you going to do :)

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Oct 02, 2012, 06:07 am
if its anything like the evalbot, your going to go to their website and hunt down the full stellarisware installer so you have the utilities that they require you to use but didnt include on the package specific install

just a heads up
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Oct 02, 2012, 06:29 am
Quote
Now what are you going to do

Sigh.  I have two problems:

1) I really don't have any projects in mind that need more performance than I can get out of an AVR.  So ARM is out there as the "must know" technology, and yet ... I don't really need it.  At least, this round of boards is starting to fulfill the promise of 32bit systems reaching the price point of 8bit systems.  If it's a choice between a $30 Teensy and a $30 Arduino, the choice is harder than picking between a $30 Arduino and a $50 Maple...

2) I'm a Mac.  Well, I'm not really STRONGLY Mac-centric, but my main computer is a Mac, and it is somewhat unexpectedly painful to give it up to go use one of the PCs or VMs instead.  This is one of the things that attracted me to Arduino in the first place: "You mean I don't have to spend the first couple of weeks just trying to make the tools work?  Sold!"  I already have CCS (ti), and CW (freescale), and AS6 (atmel) downloaded to the windows laptop, and they're sorta painful.  (The teensyduino SW is nice, though.)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Oct 02, 2012, 06:52 am
the windows lockdown is the worst part of most development tools, there are GNU TI tools but OMFG ... least their uploader program works with wine so you dont have to fire up a term, type in a novel of a command line, open up a new term, telnet to it, and then give the commands to erase and upload

but you will spend a week fussing around getting an old version of eclipse working with a hard to find plugin, matching versions, editing enviroments and general bullshit just to upload "hello world"
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Oct 02, 2012, 09:17 am
Quote
but you will spend a week fussing around getting an old version of eclipse working with a hard to find plugin, matching versions, editing enviroments and general bullshit just to upload "hello world"

I'm really really over that crap these days, spent half a lifetime frigging with paths and environment variables, and makefiles etc etc. Now I want a turn key environment or as near as damn it and I won't look at anything that's more trouble than that.

The Arduino is that of course and also I have been very happy with the LPC Xpresso environment. Not quite as easy but very close.

The SAM38XE looks like a great chip, if things turn out OK with the Due (and we get a proper IDE one way or another) I'll probably drop the LPCs.

_____
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cjdelphi on Oct 02, 2012, 09:53 am
I bought 10 shift registers and 5 flip flops for a whopping 4 dollars from ebay... thought they might come in handy one day,
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Oct 02, 2012, 10:59 am
Also bought a spot in Atmel's upcoming training seminar.  $99 should get me a day of class, lunch, an xmegaA3U Explained board, a jtagice3, and the syllabus look like it involves moving an app from xmega to sam3x, do it should provide useful data on whether the xmegas are "skippable"
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Oct 02, 2012, 11:22 am
Quote
whether the xmegas are "skippable"

I'm not overly familiar with the xmegas but I'd say they are skippable and ARM skills have to be more bankable these days.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Oct 02, 2012, 08:42 pm
My Raspberry Pi apparently shipped from Newark.  I wonder how hard it will be to get some simple GPIO routines going on it and see how fast it can pump out a square wave.

Ah, this guy already has the idea:

http://codeandlife.com/2012/07/03/benchmarking-raspberry-pi-gpio-speed/

21.9 MHz square wave.  Pretty decent.  Was actually hoping for better based on the 700Mhz reported speed of the Raspberry Pi CPU.  Arduino can be made to make a 4Mhz square wave at 16Mhz.  Why is the Pi relatively slow?

http://www.billporter.info/ready-set-oscillate-the-fastest-way-to-change-arduino-pins/
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Chagrin on Oct 02, 2012, 11:50 pm
Why is the Pi relatively slow?


If you want to re-run his tests on your own I think it would be interesting to either:
1) Optimize the operating system; shut down all unnecessary processes (notably X), disable networking, etc. and see if you can get more speed.
2) Run multiple instances of the pin toggling program on seperate pins.  One process might be able to toggle a pin at 20MHz, but I'd expect two processes to toggle pins at greater than 10MHz.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 03, 2012, 03:43 am
Ahhhh, the difference an OS makes. Is there an M$ Windoze for the PI?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Oct 03, 2012, 03:45 am

Why is the Pi relatively slow?


If you want to re-run his tests on your own I think it would be interesting to either:
1) Optimize the operating system; shut down all unnecessary processes (notably X), disable networking, etc. and see if you can get more speed.
2) Run multiple instances of the pin toggling program on seperate pins.  One process might be able to toggle a pin at 20MHz, but I'd expect two processes to toggle pins at greater than 10MHz.


I'm not sure I agree with you a hundred percent on your computer architecture work, there, Chagrin.  Operating systems don't just slow down the system a certain percentage all the time, the OS is either being executed or one of the user processes is, at least on a single core system.  So a user process runs at 100% until the OS runs at 100%, you will see it run full speed and then not at all when something else is running.  There is no way to swap it in and out so fast that you would just get the smooth set of square waves shown in my link.   For the same reason, two processes will make no difference at all on a single core system.  In fact, I see no way two cores could share the same IO pin anyway, they would step all over each other, you wouldn't get a faster wave, you would get a freaking mess with the pin shorting itself a great deal of the time, not that any architecture would allow for this.


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 03, 2012, 10:21 pm
I think that you can get a minimal OS to run its tasks always quicker than a certain length of time and be able to count on your task to run at some frequency. Maybe that can be tuned with a tunable OS?

Also, I've programmed and run a whole lot to run on single-tasking (sometimes with TSR's) DOS and there's a lot to be said about your program having the system to itself. Like being able to run a business on 10 Mz and slower 8080 to 8088 CPU's, or 16 Mz 80286 with terminals... at all.
DOS is an OS.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Oct 03, 2012, 10:41 pm
Quote
DOS is an OS.

DOS is a "program loader."
Not that that's a bad thing, nor does it disqualify it from being an "operating system."
If RPi is toggling a pin at 21MHz, that's without the linux operating system being involved.
Talking to IO in fast system is always slower than the internal cycle time.  Switching a pin at (relatively) high power at the edge of your circuitry and with a potentially significant load capacitance is "difficult."
(You also don't want to look too closely at how slow that RAM memory access is, on cache misses.)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 03, 2012, 10:46 pm
IIRC it takes an 8080 2 to 4 cycles to do most anything and way more to do some things.

On a 6502 the same happens in 1 cycle. ... or 2.


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Oct 04, 2012, 12:09 am

Quote
DOS is an OS.

DOS is a "program loader."
Not that that's a bad thing, nor does it disqualify it from being an "operating system."
If RPi is toggling a pin at 21MHz, that's without the linux operating system being involved.
Talking to IO in fast system is always slower than the internal cycle time.  Switching a pin at (relatively) high power at the edge of your circuitry and with a potentially significant load capacitance is "difficult."
(You also don't want to look too closely at how slow that RAM memory access is, on cache misses.)


OK, that is something I suspected and hoped was not true, but thanks for the information.  On the Atmel chips you can get a square wave at clock divided by four, 21Mhz on a 700Mhz system is clock divided by thirty three.  I was hoping that the Raspberry Pi was a cheap and simple route to working with higher throughput chips, like high-speed ADCs with parallel interfaces (e.g. 8 bit 100Msps), but I can see that was a pipe dream.  :(  I'd rather write code than figure out how to get a FPGA to work.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Oct 04, 2012, 03:12 am
Quote
high-speed ADCs with parallel interfaces

You might be able to connect those via the memory interface, or via some sort of DMA scheme.  But you probably can't get 100MHz; that's only 10ns for each byte, which is down near the propagation delay for individual logic-gate chips...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 04, 2012, 06:20 am
What you do with the data is going to make a difference. Hope it's not high-res face or voice recognition.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Oct 04, 2012, 06:24 am

What you do with the data is going to make a difference. Hope it's not high-res face or voice recognition.


Nah, I had some dumbass idea to make a simple oscilloscope out of it.   Just something to look at dv/dt.


Quote
high-speed ADCs with parallel interfaces

You might be able to connect those via the memory interface, or via some sort of DMA scheme.  But you probably can't get 100MHz; that's only 10ns for each byte, which is down near the propagation delay for individual logic-gate chips...


In the end if I can't get a microcontroller that can keep up I am thinking of a pure logic solution that just plows it into static RAM once the trigger voltage is hit, maybe with a CPLD or an FPGA, and then have the microcontroller read it out of memory and analyze it.  I have to figure all that out, it is outside of my skill level right now but probably not for very long.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 04, 2012, 11:24 am
Are you making square waves or reading waveforms?


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Oct 04, 2012, 08:05 pm

Are you making square waves or reading waveforms?


You talkin' to ME?  :)  I will assume so...

I would be reading, not writing, if I was looking to pull data off an ADC.  I was just using the data the guy posted about square waves being the likely upper limit for reading bits off the GPIO pins as well as writing to them.  I am not sure if that is true, but I am going with that for the time being.  My Raspberry Pi arrived from Newark today so I will have to get an image ready for it and see what it can really do.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Oct 05, 2012, 02:17 am
It may be possible to read at 100MHz for long enough to take a useful sample, but getting a 100MHz ADC working well will be a challenge I think, you won't be able to play with is on a breadboard at that speed.

I played with a similar idea a while back, I eventually decided to use hardware for the sampling into external RAM and a fast uC for triggering etc.

That said some processors have a camera interface (I think that's what it's called), most notably the PICs. AFAIK this is designed to read a parallel port directly and DMA the results into memory. That may be a good option.

_____
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Oct 05, 2012, 03:56 am
Quote
today i get my 68332 cpu

Isn't that a bit old?  Shouldn't you be looking at ColdFire microcontrollers instead?  (ok, I haven't checked whether there's a Coldfire+TPU version.  There ought to be; 68332 is getting ancient!)

I have a 68331 development board around somewhere.  It's left over from an actual 68331 development project that I was pretty deeply involved in (the cisco-500 Terminal Server!)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Oct 06, 2012, 03:17 am
I bought 3 HC-SR04 Ultrasonic range finders from AZtronics for$5 each!!!

They are really accurate, easy to use, but you can see the side lobes coming into play.

I figured for $5 a piece I'd give them a try.

Because the output is digital there is a lot of "information" that you'll miss, such as the "quality" of the echo.

The way I'd normally do it gives me an idea of what the echo came from, just like watching an old school "fish finder" on a boat.

The other surprise I got was my free sample from Coridium!
One of these!

http://www.coridium.us/prod-specs1.html (http://www.coridium.us/prod-specs1.html)

I was thinking of making a shield for it!

Overkill?

Hell yeah!

a 50Mhz ARM sitting on an Arduino seems like a good idea!  8)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Oct 06, 2012, 04:04 am
Being as the LPC1114 is the only DIP ARM around I'd say it will be a popular chip. You can get in a TSSOP as well and that will fit inside the DIP footprint IIRC. So you could make a board that allowed for PHT and SMD, one for hobbyists/protoyping and the other for production.

Coridium have loaded a BASIC interpreter, maybe Picaxe had better look out. I'd post about this on their forum but they are very touchy about posts regarding other products and they get summarily deleted.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Oct 06, 2012, 04:22 am
It's not a Basic interpreter!

The HackaDay article was really misleading, it runs compiled code.

HackaDay seem to be going down hill at a rate of knots!

The "just plug an FTDI cable in and pretend it's 1986" was a crock.

In the comments section the bloke from Coridium address's a few of the claims the writer made.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Oct 06, 2012, 05:45 am
Yes I see, it's a compiler.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Oct 06, 2012, 06:50 am

HackaDay seem to be going down hill at a rate of knots!


yea ... I really should start writing for them again, then it will go down 3x as fast hehe
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Oct 18, 2012, 12:19 am

A total steer by wire would be pretty scary for me


Well, now now you can find out (http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/17/us-nissan-technology-idUSBRE89G03A20121017) if it really would.
Quote
Japan's Nissan Motor Co plans to equip some of its luxury cars with a system to control steering electronically, rather than mechanically, the first time so-called "steer-by-wire" technology will be used in mass-produced vehicles.


And, in theory, you could hook an Arduino into that too!  ]:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Oct 18, 2012, 02:21 am
I broke down and bought a lamp/magnifier that has 36 white LED's rather than a weird circular flouro tube.
It seems whiter than my last illuminated magnifier, maybe a tad brighter as well.

Certainly runs cooler than a flouro one!

Beginning to realise I need glasses!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Oct 18, 2012, 02:34 am
Quote
Beginning to realise I need glasses!

Sad fact of life I'm afraid :(

Try one of the head-mounted magnifiers, they are great, a bit cumbersome but you can really see the small stuff clearly.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Oct 18, 2012, 07:10 am

Quote
Japan's Nissan Motor Co plans to equip some of its luxury cars with a system to control steering electronically, rather than mechanically, the first time so-called "steer-by-wire" technology will be used in mass-produced vehicles.

And, in theory, you could hook an Arduino into that too!  ]:D


They may be doing it to cut cost, like replacing tactile buttons with touch screens. By the way, I tested the MPG for my car. On highway if I use cruise control I can get the advertized 38MPG at 75MPH. I was on the other hand trying my best but only got 24MPG on local roads. They promised 27MPG. I was driving like a senior citizen.

I think the CVT is very good at high speed. It shifts to a gear ratio that optimizes engine efficiency. My engine is running at 2,000 RPM or less at 75MPH. You want to always drive with cruise control otherwise if you step on the gas, the RPM goes up and ruins your MPG. But the same CVT is horrible at low speed, especially at stop to go. It easily revs at 2,000 when I was trying to get from 0 to 20MPH and then shifts down to 1,250RPM when I hit 30PMH. Maybe I need a tune-up.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 18, 2012, 09:51 pm

Quote
Beginning to realise I need glasses!

Sad fact of life I'm afraid :(

Try one of the head-mounted magnifiers, they are great, a bit cumbersome but you can really see the small stuff clearly.

______
Rob


After getting the same advice from Grumpy Mike last year I went to Harbor Freight and checked theirs out. The one to get is the most expensive, almost $10 before the discount coupon -- I paid $7. It's got a light and has a box with 4 different double-lenses and clips on the visor I expect to hold the lens at 2 distances though you can put 2 lenses in at once (gets heavy) and maybe see germs with.

The lens flips up or down, the visor does too (and occasionally needs tightening), it's always in the right position as you move your head and it leaves both hands free. I was using a magnifier with base but the visor is so much easier to work with I won't go back. It's well worth the money or even 2x-3x what I paid.

This is the item, compare to the next cheaper one if you go there:
http://www.harborfreight.com/head-strap-magnifier-with-work-light-95890.html
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Oct 18, 2012, 09:58 pm


Quote
Beginning to realise I need glasses!

Sad fact of life I'm afraid :(

Try one of the head-mounted magnifiers, they are great, a bit cumbersome but you can really see the small stuff clearly.

______
Rob


After getting the same advice from Grumpy Mike last year I went to Harbor Freight and checked theirs out. The one to get is the most expensive, almost $10 before the discount coupon -- I paid $7. It's got a light and has a box with 4 different double-lenses and clips on the visor I expect to hold the lens at 2 distances though you can put 2 lenses in at once (gets heavy) and maybe see germs with.

The lens flips up or down, the visor does too (and occasionally needs tightening), it's always in the right position as you move your head and it leaves both hands free. I was using a magnifier with base but the visor is so much easier to work with I won't go back. It's well worth the money or even 2x-3x what I paid.

This is the item, compare to the next cheaper one if you go there:
http://www.harborfreight.com/head-strap-magnifier-with-work-light-95890.html



Based on comments on another thread I posted about working with surface mount parts, I bought this:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0015IP380

More expensive than Harbor Freight but hopefully it is worth it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 20, 2012, 03:08 am
If it isn't, try the other as 4 different strength lenses to choose from is really nice.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Nov 16, 2012, 06:04 pm
Last night Adafruit had 10 Arduino Dues available.  I got mine.  All gone now, sorry.

They just shipped!  WHOOT

Order Confirmation from Adafruit Industries

Thanks for shopping with us today!

The following are the details of your order.
------------------------------------------------------
Products
------------------------------------------------------
1 x Arduino Due - assembled (Due) [ID:1076] = $49.95
------------------------------------------------------
Sub-Total: $49.95
Sales Tax: $0.00
United States Postal Service (0.19lbs) (First-Class Mail incl. $0.75 insurance): $3.87
Total: $53.82
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 16, 2012, 07:55 pm
I got 100 18mm piezos for $10.40.

They work but not so well as the ones I paid more for and they are flimsy, not suited for hard use but okay as vibration/touch sensors.

I haven't tried yet but I'm not sure they'd last as buzzers either, not after how one came apart.

As buttons, I think a diode will serve to debounce (real fast touch read) but maybe need 4 as a bridge to keep pin-safe?

I also got some CR2025 batteries for a remote and note DealExtreme shipped a 5 pack as ordered but with 1 missing. I won't raise hell over it (maybe 25 cents) but it's not a good sign at all.

Still waiting on 3 bare-board MP3 players with SD adapter and 3 breadboard-ready SD adapters.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 26, 2012, 12:34 pm
I got my SD Modules and MP3 players (which were not quite what I thought) and went looking for docs on the SD modules. But there's none posted so I emailed LC China Tech and they say they will datasheets on whatever they make.

I'd like to get opinions of the things they do make, some of the modules psych me up a bit. Like the two that look like they can do USB hosting, and the nice MP3 module and others that should take care of those "Arduino hasn't got the speed" projects.

http://www.lctech-inc.com/Hardware/

I bought the SD modules through DealExtreme, $2.60 each for 3. So far it looks like all it will take to connect to an UNO is 8 female-to-male jumper wires. If I can work them out then just about anyone should be able to use them.  :)

LC tells me they will beat the price on 1 or many without asking what I paid. Also they tell me they take PayPal. However their site looks like it needs help if it's to become hobby-friendly.

Of course soldering up an SD adapter is probably even cheaper.





Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Nov 27, 2012, 03:20 am
eh i dunno in single quantities I spent 2.90 for a socket, 52 cents on a level shifter, + board + time + header
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 27, 2012, 03:35 am
Hey I -have- the SD modules. They did cost me $2.60 each though shipping on the total $48 order did run almost $2. What are the chances that China subsidizes electronics, like they do solar panels?


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Nov 27, 2012, 07:23 am
its not a matter of being subsidized, its a matter of bulk

just order 10 of something save 30 cents a unit, now order 100,000 of them ...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 27, 2012, 10:23 am
And when you make things in 100x previous quantities, it is possible to include tricks that radically cut the cost to make them. I know this for a fact having "been there, done it, wrote the cost estimation and bidding packages" back when I was a production engineer in the 80's.

I say possible because I'm not there. They may be clearing out a lot of items they don't want to continue or just made too many of and want to clear warehouse space. That would also be economical.

Maybe Dealextreme made a mistake and sold these at a loss? Ever find something mis-marked at a big store? Usually luck like that happens when my pockets aren't full, but I've scored before!
Or not a mistake? China LC Tech never asked what *I* paid, just blanket-stated they could beat the cost.

So for me and you where we are is kind of the same boat. But hey man! You want links? Maybe get some yourself?

http://dx.com/s/sd+module.html?range=ShortHeadLine1&category=499&GEPrice=1.00&LEPrice=4.00
I got the 3rd one, it's $3.20 in single but I bought 3. Catch is when you order "bulk" (more than 1) you have almost $2 shipping for the whole order instead of free shipping.
http://dx.com/p/sd-card-module-slot-socket-reader-for-arduino-arm-mcu-133709

http://dx.com/c/electrical-tools-499/diy-parts-components-410
This is the whole DIY selection, note the BT module for $6.60 in single, $5.48 ea at 10.

And I got docs. The only one I couldn't have found is the module schematic showing the LM1117-3.3 between the 5V and 3.3V pins. Other than that, I might need to run at 3.3V or level shift MOSI, MISO, SCK and CS.... I need help to be sure. Man, that could ruin the "quick, clean and easy" part of this nutritious breakfast!

The rest of the docs are generic SD card and SPI specs. I will share if you want.

You do know there's info in the Playground to solder wires to an SD adapter (the kind you often get with micro-SD cards) and run directly from that (must be 3.3V levels). It's not elegant or quick and clean but to a guy with your skills I guess easy is still on the list.  ;)

Edit:
Looking more at the schematic, I see where the signal lines all connect to 3.3V through 10k resistors. I am puzzled, perhaps 5V signal loses kick through the resistors while the same don't allow enough 3.3V through to give logic level ON? For all I know, I'm looking at a level-shifter, I don't know hardware beyond the rank amateur level.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Nov 27, 2012, 03:31 pm
I've bought a number of items from China and yes (almost) they subsidize shipping.  Most of the stuff come with free shipping.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Nov 27, 2012, 04:16 pm
Well, wasn't feeling too hot for a few days, so I got up to one of my favorite timekillers, bottom feeding on weird stuff on ebay.  I'll just surf around looking for oddball items that nobody bids on, and throw a dollar bid.  When I do this, I'll bid on like ten or twenty items, and maybe one item out of a hundred or so, I will win...

So, this time I bid on and won this:

(http://www.zahmnagel.com/Portals/0/Series%205000photo.jpg)

Brand new in box "Zahm and Nagel" laboratory testing device.. seems to be some type of thing for measuring gas pressure and taking samples.  Absolutely no idea what to do with it.. I think it may end up as part of the "Alchemy" props.  If I find out the thing has some great value I will of course try to resell it- but since it was up for auction for a week and got ONE bid (mine) I suspect that selling it might be difficult at best.  On reading the docs online, it seems it might be for brewing beer and wine, maybe the local Brew-it-yourself hobby beermaking shop might be interested.

On a more useful bent, I got four Dallas DS12887A real time clocks, new in tube.. I only needed one, and got the tube for a buck.; two SMC air valves ($1.75); a ten pack of ULN2003 ($1.60); and a five pack of 3w UV LED's ($2.50); two 328's ($3); and a couple of discretes like resistors and caps for under a dollar.  The parts bins and wallet both appreciate me shopping at three am with no immediate need for the purchases being made...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Nov 27, 2012, 05:25 pm

Well, wasn't feeling too hot for a few days, so I got up to one of my favorite timekillers, bottom feeding on weird stuff on ebay.  I'll just surf around looking for oddball items that nobody bids on, and throw a dollar bid.  When I do this, I'll bid on like ten or twenty items, and maybe one item out of a hundred or so, I will win...

So, this time I bid on and won this:

(http://www.zahmnagel.com/Portals/0/Series%205000photo.jpg)

Brand new in box "Zahm and Nagel" laboratory testing device.. seems to be some type of thing for measuring gas pressure and taking samples.  Absolutely no idea what to do with it.. I think it may end up as part of the "Alchemy" props.  If I find out the thing has some great value I will of course try to resell it- but since it was up for auction for a week and got ONE bid (mine) I suspect that selling it might be difficult at best.  On reading the docs online, it seems it might be for brewing beer and wine, maybe the local Brew-it-yourself hobby beermaking shop might be interested.

On a more useful bent, I got four Dallas DS12887A real time clocks, new in tube.. I only needed one, and got the tube for a buck.; two SMC air valves ($1.75); a ten pack of ULN2003 ($1.60); and a five pack of 3w UV LED's ($2.50); two 328's ($3); and a couple of discretes like resistors and caps for under a dollar.  The parts bins and wallet both appreciate me shopping at three am with no immediate need for the purchases being made...


Sweet.  That is something that American Science and Surplus would try to sell for a hundred bucks.  That looks really nice, whatever the heck it is.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Dec 04, 2012, 06:24 am
10 6volt DC 500ma 120-240AC switching wallwarts

I have a limited run Apple II project which requires power plugs, these things are on sale (ending tonight) for a 1.29$ each (+ like 7$ shipping) at the electronic goldmine ... now I have to be sure to use a LDO regulator, but at that price I could not refuse.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 04, 2012, 10:03 am
Quote
A quality telephoto for my nature shots.  Almost as much for that one lens as it was to replace all that hardware!

Here's my last lens purchase

(http://robgray.com/grayoutdoors/about/about_equipment/graphics/400.png)

A 400mm f4 DO, $7000 near new.

For nature there's nothing like a shit-hot tele lens.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Dec 04, 2012, 03:43 pm
Graynomad, Wow,....just WOW.  :smiley-mr-green:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Dec 04, 2012, 04:07 pm

Quote
A quality telephoto for my nature shots.  Almost as much for that one lens as it was to replace all that hardware!

Here's my last lens purchase

(http://robgray.com/grayoutdoors/about/about_equipment/graphics/400.png)

A 400mm f4 DO, $7000 near new.

For nature there's nothing like a shit-hot tele lens.

______
Rob



I used to have a Canon 200mm f/1.8 which is a similar built lens, really big and stubby, not as modern as this thing.  When the used price on it went to $4k on eBay after it was discontinued I sold it off.  The only piece of technology equipment I ever made a profit on. (bought it for $2K used when they were still in production).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 04, 2012, 04:23 pm
@draythomp
Yes it's one nice lens. I had a 300/2.8 for years with my old Canon FD system but all that went when I changed to digital a few years ago.

This 400 is smaller and lighter than the 300/2.8, light enough to carry around just in case you need it.

@JoeN
The 200/1.8 is quite similar physically but of course useful for a very different type of photography.

I got this 2nd hand but not used from a press photographer who decided to get something bigger. When I first decided to get one they were $12k and I just couldn't justify that. I got this for something like $6995 and I see they are now $8000+ at DigitalRev.

This is one great lens, wide open with a 1.4 converter it's as sharp as a tack. This and my 1D with a flash and better beamer is my standard wildlife kit these days.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dhenry on Dec 04, 2012, 05:23 pm
Quote
like 7$ shipping


I called up my IT guy and a box of laptop power supplies showed up on my door next day, like 20 - 30 of them. More if I had wanted.

They cannot get rid of them fast enough.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Dec 04, 2012, 05:35 pm

@JoeN
The 200/1.8 is quite similar physically but of course useful for a very different type of photography.


Oh, I know.  I was more focusing on the "big-ass white Canon lens with a HUGE front element" thing.  I know it isn't important but these types of lenses are physically impressive.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 05, 2012, 01:43 am
Quote
these types of lenses are physically impressive.

Why do you think I bought it :)

Actually this sort of thing is why I bought it

(http://www.robgray.com/photos/images/34535.jpg)
(http://www.robgray.com/photos/images/34433.jpg)

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Dec 05, 2012, 02:43 am
Those photos get a bigger WOW than the lens! Very nice, Rob!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 05, 2012, 03:25 am
Thanks, it keeps me off the streets :)

More here if you want to have a look.

http://graynomad.smugmug.com/ (http://graynomad.smugmug.com/)

And please take my poll here

http://robgray.com/grayoutdoors/poll.php (http://robgray.com/grayoutdoors/poll.php)

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 05, 2012, 03:38 am


@JoeN
The 200/1.8 is quite similar physically but of course useful for a very different type of photography.


Oh, I know.  I was more focusing on the "big-ass white Canon lens with a HUGE front element" thing.  I know it isn't important but these types of lenses are physically impressive.


You mean size does matter?  :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 05, 2012, 10:03 am
Is this cool or what?

Adjustable 20 watt max switching mode adjustable voltage regulator (step down) with adjustable automatic current limiter (0-2A), and with display switchable to input voltage, output voltage, or output current draw or alternating display.  I couldn't pass it up.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/170929163665?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Dec 05, 2012, 10:42 am
And please take my poll here
http://robgray.com/grayoutdoors/poll.php (http://robgray.com/grayoutdoors/poll.php)


XD
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 05, 2012, 10:54 am
Only $11, amazing. I might grab a couple myself.

@CB
Totally unbiased, honest.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 05, 2012, 07:01 pm
I couldn't pass up one of these:

http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/375-dcii (http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/375-dcii)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 10, 2012, 09:33 pm
Since I believe the Motorola 6809 was the best 8-bit microprocessor ever made, I ordered a couple while they are still available. I ordered a couple of 6821s (PIA) and 6850s (ACIA) while I was at it. I need to find some compatible SRAM and some program storage memory that is relatively easy to program as I have no idea where my EPROM programmer has gotten off to. Any recommendations welcome.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: sbright33 on Dec 10, 2012, 10:53 pm
Does anyone remember the "computer" from 70's made out of long plastic switches and wires and lights?  You stuck pre-printed paper in the plastic in front of the lights.  You stuck wires in the holes.  Each lever switched like 8 switches which were wired in parallel.  I didn't know who else to ask this question to, so I thought I'd try here.  It's related to the post about the gravity powered computer above.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Dec 11, 2012, 01:07 am
Wafer connectors from dipmicro.com
Many sizes to play with, yeah!
The kit did't include the box.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 11, 2012, 01:18 am
Quote
6809 was the best 8-bit microprocessor ever made, I ordered a couple while they are still available.

I used to program on a 6809 as well. How about we make a retro dual processor (09/Z80) board :)

Quote
compatible SRAM and some program storage memory that is relatively easy to program as I have no idea where my EPROM programmer has gotten off to. Any recommendations welcome.

There's plenty of SRAM around these days that will work. As for the EPROM, maybe use flash or just battery-back the SRAM. You could build in a modern micro to act as a programmer.

Another idea is to have an modern micro actually serve the EPROM data.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Dec 11, 2012, 01:39 am
(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/ABM-Sensor-Ultrasonic-Distance-Measurement-Sensor-0-7-20-ft-/16/!Bcme0Iw!2k~$(KGrHqQH-EYEquVLEsYUBK1MD8Rpzg~~_1.JPG)

An ABM Ultrasonic Industrial sensor (used for measuring fullness of large tanks, I think),  .7 - 20ft range, absolutely no idea what to use it for, but won the auction on a 99 cent bid with free shipping. 4- 20ma current loop it says, I'll have to research it a bit.

I love oddball stuff....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 11, 2012, 01:41 am

Quote
6809 was the best 8-bit microprocessor ever made, I ordered a couple while they are still available.

I used to program on a 6809 as well. How about we make a retro dual processor (09/Z80) board :)

Quote
compatible SRAM and some program storage memory that is relatively easy to program as I have no idea where my EPROM programmer has gotten off to. Any recommendations welcome.

There's plenty of SRAM around these days that will work. As for the EPROM, maybe use flash or just battery-back the SRAM. You could build in a modern micro to act as a programmer.

Another idea is to have an modern micro actually serve the EPROM data.

______
Rob


I would certainly be willing to work on the 6809 half. :) I had a Z80 CP/M machine (Big Board) but didn't do much hardware development on the Z80. As I recall though, it was very Motorola like at the bus level so it would be a good match.

I have already started thinking about the memory. Battery backed ram might be the way to go. On the other hand I was thinking about building a programmer for EEPROM that ran off my Raspberry Pi. I have already compiled and tested a cross assembler that runs nicely on the Pi and I thought since the hex files would already be on it it would make sense to use it for the programmer.

How would you propose serving the EPROM data via micro?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 11, 2012, 01:49 am

(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/ABM-Sensor-Ultrasonic-Distance-Measurement-Sensor-0-7-20-ft-/16/!Bcme0Iw!2k~$(KGrHqQH-EYEquVLEsYUBK1MD8Rpzg~~_1.JPG)

An ABM Ultrasonic Industrial sensor (used for measuring fullness of large tanks, I think),  .7 - 20ft range, absolutely no idea what to use it for, but won the auction on a 99 cent bid with free shipping. 4- 20ma current loop it says, I'll have to research it a bit.

I love oddball stuff....


If it's functional that will be quite a buy as it appears to be an industrial unit and probably cost well north of $1K. First thing to determine if it's a simple loop wired '2 wire transmitter', meaning it has only two terminals to wire to. If so a simple current loop wiring would be a +12 to +24vdc power supply to positive terminal of unit, - terminal of unit to 150 ohm resistor, other end of resistor to negative of the 24vdc power supply. You can then read the analog measurement range as a +1 to +5vdc voltage across the resistor. This is easy to interface to a arduino analog input pin, just wire a common ground from the 24 volt negative to an arduino ground pin and the other end of the 150 ohm resistor to an analog input pin.

Might this be the datasheet? http://www.abmsensor.com/pdf/2010092wire-sanit.pdf


Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Dec 11, 2012, 02:06 am
Yep, looks like it.  I believe it is the version without the RS-232 or 485 interface, it's NOS surplus from a PLC reseller. 

Should arrive tomorrow or Wednesday..
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 11, 2012, 02:16 am

Does anyone remember the "computer" from 70's made out of long plastic switches and wires and lights?  You stuck pre-printed paper in the plastic in front of the lights.  You stuck wires in the holes.  Each lever switched like 8 switches which were wired in parallel.  I didn't know who else to ask this question to, so I thought I'd try here.  It's related to the post about the gravity powered computer above.


That doesn't ring any bells at all!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 11, 2012, 02:36 am
Quote
As I recall though, it was very Motorola like at the bus level

IIRC (it's bee a few years) there were a couple of fundamental differences, the 68xx chips had a R/W signal and a CS signal and everything is memory mapped. The Z80 has separate WR and RD signals plus separate select signals for memory and IO.

However it was easy to make them compatible with a couple of AND gates or whatever.

Quote
I was thinking about building a programmer for EEPROM that ran off my Raspberry Pi.

Unless you plan to remove the chip for programming you have to dual port the memory chip, easy enough but adds several chips. I had an EPROM emulator on the market that plugged into the EPROM socket and used SRAM with the dual porting added.

Quote
I thought since the hex files would already be on it it would make sense to use it for the programmer.

Easy, if you have a valid HEX file you can easily load it into the target memory subject to the above.

Quote
How would you propose serving the EPROM data via micro?

Well these old chips weren't very fast eh? Maybe connect the AVR (or whatever) up with pins the same as an EPROM and monitor the CS/RD signals, when you see an active select you use the address to index into an array and provide the data.

This was proposed by somebody here quite some time ago, originally I poo-pooed the idea but it may have legs. Especially if you can control the target CPU's clock.

Adding dual-ported RAM would be easier but uses a few chips, this idea only needs a single chip.

Or build an FLASH emulator for development and drop a chip in when finished, just like we used to do but without the UV light :)

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 11, 2012, 03:17 am
Quote
Unless you plan to remove the chip for programming you have to dual port the memory chip, easy enough but adds several chips. I had an EPROM emulator on the market that plugged into the EPROM socket and used SRAM with the dual porting added.

I had though to remove the chip for programming but I see there are I2C bus expanders with tristate outputs so I'd probably use those to dual port the memory.
Quote
Well these old chips weren't very fast eh? Maybe connect the AVR (or whatever) up with pins the same as an EPROM and monitor the CS/RD signals, when you see an active select you use the address to index into an array and provide the data.

This was proposed by somebody here quite some time ago, originally I poo-pooed the idea but it may have legs. Especially if you can control the target CPU's clock.

The NMOS version of the 6809 couldn't tolerate a stopped clock but you could certainly stretch it. If the AVR supplied the clock, it would be pretty easy to do what you suggest, I imagine. An interesting exercise.
Quote
Adding dual-ported RAM would be easier but uses a few chips, this idea only needs a single chip.

Albeit one with lots of I/O. :)
Quote
Or build an FLASH emulator for development and drop a chip in when finished, just like we used to do but without the UV light

I had two big EPROM erasers running full time. I'll never forget the smell of conductive foam exposed to UV light! :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 11, 2012, 03:38 am
Quote
I'll never forget the smell of conductive foam exposed to UV light!

It's funny how you remember such things.

Quote
I had two big EPROM erasers running full time.

That's why I built the emulator, got sick of swapping chips.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 11, 2012, 03:45 am

Quote
I'll never forget the smell of conductive foam exposed to UV light!

It's funny how you remember such things.

Quote
I had two big EPROM erasers running full time.

That's why I built the emulator, got sick of swapping chips.

______
Rob

Memories are coming back. I, too, had a ROM emulator later on. Very handy. :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Dec 11, 2012, 09:48 am
Quote
6809 was the best 8-bit microprocessor ever made,

You know, Freescale still sells microcontrollers that are pretty 6809-like.  Also microcontrollers with a 68000 core ("Coldfire") (my particular favorite, I think.)
TI's MSP430 is a pretty nice architecture as well, in the same sort of CISCy vein...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Dec 11, 2012, 02:55 pm
We used Motorola chips at work mostly but for my personal stuff I preferred Z8/80/180 etc.

I left the game for many years and never got back into either on my return. I guess times have moved on and for me it's all AVR and ARM these days.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 11, 2012, 05:57 pm

Quote
6809 was the best 8-bit microprocessor ever made,

You know, Freescale still sells microcontrollers that are pretty 6809-like.  Also microcontrollers with a 68000 core ("Coldfire") (my particular favorite, I think.)
TI's MSP430 is a pretty nice architecture as well, in the same sort of CISCy vein...



The Freescale chips don't seem to come in any sort of convenient package and they require lots of decoupling capacitors to get them to work properly. Nice architecture though.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: alexhb on Dec 12, 2012, 10:09 pm
just picked up some blue copper clad. XD will be a fun little change!
http://www.ebay.com/itm/9-sht-Copper-Clad-Laminate-CEM-047-4-x-6-SS-BLUE-/310420464500?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4846806374 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/9-sht-Copper-Clad-Laminate-CEM-047-4-x-6-SS-BLUE-/310420464500?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4846806374)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 14, 2012, 09:30 pm
Not a purchase but I didn't want to start a thread just to brag. :)

I got my FREE SchmartShield for Arduino today.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Dec 14, 2012, 09:58 pm

Not a purchase but I didn't want to start a thread just to brag. :)

I got my FREE SchmartShield for Arduino today.


There was something out there for free and I wasn't notified?  Damn.

They sent me a 50% off ad earlier this week and I bought some more Schmartboards from them.  Those things work.  Then again, so does "flood and wick" but I like the Schmartboard way of doing things.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 14, 2012, 10:34 pm


Not a purchase but I didn't want to start a thread just to brag. :)

I got my FREE SchmartShield for Arduino today.


There was something out there for free and I wasn't notified?  Damn.

They sent me a 50% off ad earlier this week and I bought some more Schmartboards from them.  Those things work.  Then again, so does "flood and wick" but I like the Schmartboard way of doing things.

You snooze you lose! :) Yeah, they had a giveaway of your choice of any of their boards if you posted a picture of a project using one of their products.
I really like the way their stuff works too, although "flood and wick" works perfectly for me as well.
I wish this week's sale had included their SMD to DIP adapters too, I would have really stocked up on those.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Dec 16, 2012, 11:01 pm
Bottom feeding again.. Hit a great one.

20 pcs AT90S4414... Fourteen dollars shipped.  40 pin (32 GPIO) AVR, same setup as the 8515 but with half the storage.  I have a number of ideas for these, and at under a dollar for a 40 pin AVR, I can afford to blow a few up.. One is 8 channels of RGB fading per chip, with SPI interface.. I am thinking that using these even as support chips for a 328 or Mega is a fine use.   
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Dec 16, 2012, 11:15 pm

Quote
6809 was the best 8-bit microprocessor ever made,

You know, Freescale still sells microcontrollers that are pretty 6809-like.  Also microcontrollers with a 68000 core ("Coldfire") (my particular favorite, I think.)
TI's MSP430 is a pretty nice architecture as well, in the same sort of CISCy vein...


You prompted me to take a closer look at the Freescale controllers. Since Schmartboard makes an LQFP to DIP board, I decided to try a MC9S12 in a 48 pin package. The instruction set is very much like the 6809, as you point out.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Dec 19, 2012, 04:21 pm

Does anyone remember the "computer" from 70's made out of long plastic switches and wires and lights? 
Yep. I had one. It came as a kit and I had to assemble it. The hardest part was the Ground wire, which looped past all the lightbulbs and more less around the box. The kit had one roll of insulated wire, so I had to get the insulation off wire for this. Edited - fixed some typos

As I remember each switch was basically 8 pairs of Break/Make  (ie either the bottom wires was connect or the top wires) with 3 hoes for each and every connection. There were 10 switches and lights. This gave about 80 "gates" (ie you needed two to make an AND)

Nope, no leftovers of that in my attic. Only in the attic between my ears.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Dec 25, 2012, 12:56 am
Back to the topic: Minor Xmas gift to myself - stocking filler - just for fun - an RGB LED Shield that was on xmas-sale on my local Arduino-pusher. 3 TLC5940s and 4x4 RGB LEDs.

Also purchased (the reason for being on that site) a replacement USB2Serial adapter as the previous one had lost it's blue magic smoke.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: amacmullen14 on Dec 27, 2012, 03:17 am
Half-purchase, half-gift, an Arturia minibrute analog synth.

I love it.

I've already posted 4 demos of it to soundcloud.  And I haven't even tried hooking it up to my other gear yet, I've only so far messed around with its internal features and simple multitrack recordings in Garageband.

here's a partial cover I did of a song I like, all sounds including drums synthesized by the minibrute:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrazRIeiO_c
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: DuaneB on Dec 27, 2012, 01:03 pm
'Mini Brute' great name for a great bit of kit.

I treated myself to a stylophone, monotron and a nebulophone - I have spent hours playing the stylophone through the monotron filter - adding the stylophone to the monotron overcomes the common criticism of the monotrons hopeless keyboard.

Duane B
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 03, 2013, 01:16 am
The latest package finally arrived from HK! Factory-direct deals. I got my stuff, the experience has been positive.

1 MP3 dev module
1 3-axis gyro module
1 3D magnetic compass module, 1-2 deg accuracy (won't be using it to survey with)
3 SD modules (I got a real good price)
4 ultrasonic range finder modules
2 10A 240VAC relay modules
4 4 digit 7 segment led display modules (uses 7 + 4 pins, but very low cost)
2 BT modules capable of host or slave operation

http://www.lctech-inc.com/Hardware/

Notice no prices listed? Minimal docs? Their business model is just ask. They do PayPal.
My contact: chinalctech@163.com

Just to be clear: I don't work for or have any deal with them except my own prices. I get nothing for or from what anyone else buys. My relation is purely as a hobbyist, I do no sales and get no commissions.
But I see those things and have a small collection, I just have to share especially with others like me who aren't so great at assembling hardware and also the ones who want to save time. All the modules have pins.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: winner10920 on Jan 03, 2013, 01:06 pm
Jw how much did u pay for some of those thing like the slave,master bluetooth and the sd card slot?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 03, 2013, 06:22 pm
They emphasize that the prices I get are -my- prices only. I gave some advice that maybe helped them or showed what they like. Or maybe I was just lucky that day but they will try and beat competition.
The less complicated modules, the things I bought more than 1 of all ran me less than $2 each, the more complicated ones were all under $10 for me. The BT master/slave units were less than $8, I have seen BT units on eBay and DX for less than $7 but I dunno the differences since LC sells BT master and BT slave as well as the dual-units and I can't read Chinese to know what-all the differences are so I ordered the best they make.

You _have_ to ask. That costs sending an email referencing what parts and about how many.

It is the same process of seeking bids and getting replies that business ran by back in the 80's and 90's when I wrote production and cost estimation software. They're not geared towards small quantity purchasers but they welcome us perhaps because hobbyists do come up with uses that may 'go viral' in an industrial scale way.



Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jan 03, 2013, 06:26 pm
Most of those Asian devices are available from many many Asian sellers on Ebay at I would guess the same price they are selling directly (but without listing their prices, who knows). It's just a matter of searching and comparing the offerings.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 03, 2013, 06:38 pm
Definitely, always ---- shop!

LC is a place I found with neat toys at good prices, not the second coming!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: codlink on Jan 04, 2013, 02:49 am
Swift 80 Series Microscope.  10x and 20x magnification.  Got it off Ebay for 50 bucks.  Think I got a pretty good deal.  Been wanting one for soldering those fine pitched ICs that have been stuck in the parts bin for awhile.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Chagrin on Jan 04, 2013, 03:00 am
The BT master/slave units were less than $8, I have seen BT units on eBay and DX for less than $7 but I dunno the differences since LC sells BT master and BT slave as well as the dual-units and I can't read Chinese to know what-all the differences are so I ordered the best they make.


They are programmable from slave to master / etc, or it might be dependent on the firmware as to whether it can be switched. It's the same hardware, at any rate. I recall stumbling across a firmware download for these modules so ... something to look for perhaps.

Stuff to read if you're bored:
http://elecfreaks.com/store/download/datasheet/Bluetooth/HC-0305%20serail%20module%20AT%20commamd%20set%20201104%20revised.pdf
http://www.seeedstudio.com/wiki/index.php?title=Bluetooth_Bee
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jan 04, 2013, 04:56 am

Swift 80 Series Microscope.  10x and 20x magnification.  Got it off Ebay for 50 bucks.  Think I got a pretty good deal.  Been wanting one for soldering those fine pitched ICs that have been stuck in the parts bin for awhile.


Thats a nice looking microscope (though it looks "backwards" to the ones I am use to seeing) ... 50 bucks hunh, crap first I need a bigger bench (still using my card table ... since 2006)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: codlink on Jan 04, 2013, 05:06 am

Thats a nice looking microscope (though it looks "backwards" to the ones I am use to seeing) ... 50 bucks hunh, crap first I need a bigger bench (still using my card table ... since 2006)


The eye piece rotates 360º.. If that was your meaning..
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jan 04, 2013, 05:15 am
ok now that could be darn handy. the one I use at work I am constantly trying to "twist" the board to inspect it from different angles and the neck of the microscope is always in the way
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 04, 2013, 06:12 am

The BT master/slave units were less than $8, I have seen BT units on eBay and DX for less than $7 but I dunno the differences since LC sells BT master and BT slave as well as the dual-units and I can't read Chinese to know what-all the differences are so I ordered the best they make.


They are programmable from slave to master / etc, or it might be dependent on the firmware as to whether it can be switched. It's the same hardware, at any rate. I recall stumbling across a firmware download for these modules so ... something to look for perhaps.

Stuff to read if you're bored:
http://elecfreaks.com/store/download/datasheet/Bluetooth/HC-0305%20serail%20module%20AT%20commamd%20set%20201104%20revised.pdf
http://www.seeedstudio.com/wiki/index.php?title=Bluetooth_Bee


Thanks but I don't want to scarf their bandwidth and take their docs after buying elsewhere that gives me docs. I have used AT commands with modems, long ago. I will try starting there.

I need to start buying at sites that post support just to support the practice of posted support.
Hmmmm, that's got meter to it....

I got an ultrasonic module figured out last night for playtime.
I only had one detour. After I flip the trigger on and off there is a period before the echo pin goes HIGH and stays HIGH until the echo returns. The site description kind of slid around that how long the echo pin takes to start timing.
I shoulda knowed better, once the trigger is hit the rig sends 8 pulses of 40 kHz (it says) which I think the echo pin doesn't go HIGH until the last wave is out. I was testing 400-480 passes through a while loop with a timeout test included. Those times varied by 80 usecs with everything sitting still. Do I need caps across any of those lines perhaps? It's a low power device but so is the Teensy running it.

The round-trip distance formula at 340 m/s comes out 5882 usecs per meter. Temperature (not density) from Standard changes sound speed m/s. Colder is slower.  

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Jan 06, 2013, 06:17 pm
Not a good photo but a fun watch. The MetaWatch Strata. The firmware is still in its infancy but is still plenty useful with the iPhone 5.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wilsonsofoxford on Jan 07, 2013, 04:29 am
Hey everyone, first post here, kind of new to all of this.

We hit the Disabled American Veterans Thrift store yesterday. Brought home:


Amazingly, no objection from my wife. Now the question is, what do I do with the stuff? I have a vague idea of what sorts of components I may now have but I don't know how to go about identifying them and removing them. Any tips for a newbie?

I've got myself an Arudino recently, I've burned through the beginners books and some basic tutorials and now I've remembered I don't know how to source electronics components. I'm itching to get at those parts though. Eventually I'd like to work towards exploring Autonomous Underwater Bots which I think could be very useful in my field (Hydrographic Survey). For examples schools of robot "fish" to collect data on water conditions. Just need to get my head around components.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: codlink on Jan 07, 2013, 05:36 am

I've remembered I don't know how to source electronics components. I'm itching to get at those parts though.


I mostly get what I need from the internet.  But here is a few of the common sites.

http://www.sparkfun.com/
http://www.digikey.com/ - Site has about %99 of the components you will ever need.  Only bad side is digging through all of them.  But it has an excellent filter system.
http://www.mouser.com/ - Pretty much the same as above
http://www.taydaelectronics.com/
http://www.adafruit.com/
And of course Ebay
Locally - Radio Shack (only for those very common parts)

Eventually I'd like to work towards exploring Autonomous Underwater Bots which I think could be very useful in my field (Hydrographic Survey). For examples schools of robot "fish" to collect data on water conditions. Just need to get my head around components.


Search this site, quite a few members doing the same thing.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dhenry on Jan 08, 2013, 01:32 pm
If you limit your selections and buy in bulk (hundreds or thousands), you will find that it is much cheaper to buy from a reputable distributor like digikey, etc.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jan 18, 2013, 05:31 am
After having to wait for restock notification before ordering I was finally able to get a couple of items from ADAfruit that looked especially interesting to me. They arrived yesterday and both products get a lefty's thumbs up report.

First is an assembled (minus soldering on stacking headers) SD/RTC shield board for just $20. This thing is sweet, worked right off the bat and has good library support for both the SD and RTC. Everything functioned using the example sketches, although you do have to edit some SD sketches to utilize pin 10 for SS function as several are set up for a ethernet board that uses pin 4 for the SS. They include the back up battery for the RTC. The board has a two uncommited led/resistor networks for one's use and the board has it's own 3.3 vdc regulator to power the SD, it duplicates the pin13 led on board. It has a system reset switch, but does not have dedicated ICSP 2x3 pin headers. They use a real voltage translation chip rather then voltage dividers for the SD logic to arduino voltage conversion. Anyway great price, great quality, good library support, what more could one want for the basics for logging applications?

http://www.adafruit.com/products/1141

Second item is a $10 4 channel (or 2 channel differnial) 12 bit I2C ADC chip/module based on the TI ADS1015 chip. This cool chip has built in internal voltage reference, 6 different gain settings, voltage comparator with output pin, and many other features and functions. It's a great little chip that does a lot. Adafruit has a library that supports the chip and I had no trouble getting it to function. Maybe not really needed with the arduino having built in 10 bit ADC pins, but I just felt that the SD/RTC data logging shield was just begging for the extra precision and features this little ADC module would bring to the party. They also carry the same module equipped with the 16 bit ADC version of the chip called the TI ADS1115, for $15. So I just soldered a 10 pin male header onto the SD/RTC board and soldered a 10 pin stacking header on the ADC module so the module can live on the SD/RTC shield or be easily unplugged and used elsewhere if needed.

12 bit ADC   http://www.adafruit.com/products/1083

16 bit ADC   http://www.adafruit.com/products/1085

Well that's the report of the latest. Adafruit is great at Arduino support and makes and documents well a lot of very cool and useful stuff, check them out if you haven't already.

http://www.adafruit.com/

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jan 18, 2013, 05:48 am
Well I didn't buy it myself, but look what I got from the Fluke Fairy (http://www.fluke.com/fluke/m3en/Digital-Multimeters/Fluke-17B.htm?PID=75002) for Christmas.... They were out of stock and it arrived last week  8)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Jan 19, 2013, 06:44 am
Lefty,

Nice chips/breakout boards. I'm still looking for easy to use bipolar ADC to measure +-10V range. Too bad these ones are unipolar.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Chagrin on Jan 19, 2013, 08:52 am
This is an MCP3422 (16 bit, 2 channel differential, 0-7V, I2C) on one of dipmicro's adapters. Somehow I soldered this one OK but don't think I'll buy these adapters again. You'll have to forgive me for going pretty light on the solder on those pin headers.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Jan 21, 2013, 03:26 pm

Nice chips/breakout boards. I'm still looking for easy to use bipolar ADC to measure +-10V range. Too bad these ones are unipolar.

May I suggest the use of a custom-made  ADC driver chip from Analog Devices (http://www.analog.com/en/specialty-amplifiers/current-sense-amplifiers/ad8275/products/product.html) for this purpose? The 8275 will not only take that bipolar input and reduce the output to 0-4VDC, it'll also create a nice signal centered around 2VDC, perfect for differential ADCs with unipolar inputs.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyclegadget on Jan 21, 2013, 06:25 pm
Quote
May I suggest the use of a custom-made  ADC driver chip from Analog Devices for this purpose? The 8275 will not only take that bipolar input and reduce the output to 0-4VDC, it'll also create a nice signal centered around 2VDC, perfect for differential ADCs with unipolar inputs.


Do you think that chip would work with a guitar? My guitar outputs .7volts AC rms . I need a high impedance amplifier to make the guitar signal compatible with the Due input. I would like the level centered at 1.5V with about 1.5V swing.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 21, 2013, 07:10 pm
There's a DIY pre-amp circuit shown on this short youtube. Maybe it will help?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOJuCYgmPPE
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyclegadget on Jan 22, 2013, 03:25 am

There's a DIY pre-amp circuit shown on this short youtube. Maybe it will help?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOJuCYgmPPE



Thank you,
I think that circuit will only work for a piezo but, it put me on a better track for finding a circuit design. After following your link, I found some other sites that have some ideas that may work.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Jan 22, 2013, 03:51 pm
Cyclegadet,

I suggest you take a look at the Analog Devices and TI web sites. Both offer a wealth of information re: op-amps and from the looks of it, your application is tailor-made for an op-amp. You could go for a G=1.5 circuit that simply shifts the signal from +/- 0.7Vrms to 1.5VDC +/- 1.5Vpp. That would result in a signal from 0-3VDC, well within the specs of the Due ADC. Plus, you gain the benefit of a low-impedance source, i.e. one that will make the ADC inside the Due very very happy.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyclegadget on Jan 22, 2013, 06:15 pm
Quote
You could go for a G=1.5 circuit


That is so simple! Why didn't I think of that?!!!  :smiley-eek: That could very well work. I will double check my voltages from the guitar and then try your idea.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 23, 2013, 03:37 am
100 x 20 MHz crystals ... for $3 from eBay.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399s.jpg)

Now I'm going to try running at that speed. Although to be honest, they sound unbelievably cheap. :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 23, 2013, 03:42 am
I look forward to articles on timing at 20 MHz.  :D

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jan 23, 2013, 03:46 am
That is dirt cheap. Tayda has them for .10 each which I thought was awful cheap.

http://www.taydaelectronics.com/crystals-resonators-oscilliators/20-000-mhz-20-mhz-crystal-hc-49-s-low-profile.html

Should be a pretty simple hack in arduino, recompile bootloader fro 20Mhz and make new modified entry into core's boards.txt file. Anything else I forgot?

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 23, 2013, 04:39 am
Just for fun I programmed via the ICSP interface with the ASCII table sketch, set to output at 9600 baud.

At 20 MHz it output (seemingly correctly) at 12000 baud which sounds right (9600 * 20 / 16 = 1200).

Then I put in one of the 24 MHz crystals that I also ordered (because dhenry claimed you could clock it at 24 MHz) and it output at 14400 baud (9600 * 24 / 16 = 14400). So on the face of it, you can run at higher speeds. Now I can't say for sure that it is working perfectly, but after running for 10 minutes or so, the ASCII table is still coming out.

Trap for young players: I initially saw no output, which I spent 15 minutes mucking around trying to fix, until I realized the sketch only outputs the table once. At 24 MHz that doesn't take long!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 23, 2013, 04:42 am
He still seems to have them for $3:

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/100pcs-20-000MHZ-20-MHZ-20M-HZ-DIP-Crystal-Oscillator-HC-49S-New-/190767216545?pt=AU_B_I_Electrical_Test_Equipment&hash=item2c6a9cb7a1

Now I can't say they are all working. But one I picked at random did.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Jan 23, 2013, 04:44 am
Anything else I forgot?


millis and its ilk will be off.

This... http://arduino.cc/forum/index.php?topic=70475.0 ...cures millis (for 20 MHz).

I can probably rustle up a fix for micros (which fixes delay) if you need it.  For delayMicroseconds I suggest using _delay_us from AVR Libc.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Jan 23, 2013, 04:47 am
Now I can't say for sure that it is working perfectly...


I vaguely recall from the folks at avrfreaks that EEPROM writing is the first to "go" as the clock speed increases.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 23, 2013, 05:08 am
It would be interesting to experiment with things where speed is the essence, like writing VGA output.

Running at 24 MHz is a 50% speed boost, which isn't too shabby.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jan 23, 2013, 05:38 am
you should look at some of the xmega's, arduino support is out there, no idea how perfect it is with libraries and whatnot, but the core is there to write your own. Anyway those things come in 8 and 16 bit flavors clocked up to 32Mhz.

I have a small strip of them and some 25.175Mhz crystals, the dot clock speed of 640x480 VGA, which easily divides for sync signals (not specificly for generating 640x480 graphics)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 23, 2013, 05:48 am
I don't particularly care about recompiling the core because only a small number of things will be out. For example, baud rates, but you can compensate for that. And you could compensate for the readings returned by millis().
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jan 23, 2013, 06:28 am
https://github.com/akafugu/Xmegaduino/blob/xmegaduino/README.md
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: rvasque on Jan 23, 2013, 07:00 am
So you just popped out the 16Mhz crystal and replaced it with the 24Mhz?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 23, 2013, 07:06 am
This was on one of my breadboard models, but yes, I shoved the crystal in, and reprogrammed the fuse to not use the internal oscillator, as shown:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399t.jpg)

The ICSP programming cable is visible.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: rvasque on Jan 23, 2013, 07:09 am
So I can use any existing 16Mhz bootloader (example: from Adafruit) with a 20/24 Mhz crystal, right? -- millis() timing may be off, but all the others should work fine as is.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 23, 2013, 07:17 am
The thing about the core is, the processor doesn't really know what speed it is running at. So for example if you use the 8 MHz internal oscillator everything will just be half the speed. So a 9600 baud rate for the serial port will really be 4800 baud. And delay (1000) will really delay 2000 mS.

Now for the bootloader, the problem will be it expects a certain baud rate. However if you change boards.txt to reflect the difference, it should work. So for example, for the Uno:

Code: [Select]
uno.name=Arduino Uno
uno.upload.protocol=arduino
uno.upload.maximum_size=32256
uno.upload.speed=115200
uno.bootloader.low_fuses=0xff
uno.bootloader.high_fuses=0xde
uno.bootloader.extended_fuses=0x05
uno.bootloader.path=optiboot
uno.bootloader.file=optiboot_atmega328.hex
uno.bootloader.unlock_bits=0x3F
uno.bootloader.lock_bits=0x0F
uno.build.mcu=atmega328p
uno.build.f_cpu=16000000L
uno.build.core=arduino
uno.build.variant=standard


Since the upload speed is normally 115200 you would need to increase that to 115200 * 24 / 16, which is 172800, assuming the USB chip can handle that speed.

However in my case I programmed with ICSP (not the bootloader) so that didn't apply. So, disclaimer: I didn't test with a bootloader.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 23, 2013, 11:00 am
Could you bootload at one speed and run at different?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 23, 2013, 12:02 pm
Absolutely. All the bootloader does is put the program into program memory. You could then turn the power off, replace the crystal, and power it up again.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Jan 31, 2013, 07:28 pm
One of my offspring got one of these for Christmas. Have any of you seen them? Made in the UK and pretty nifty.

http://www.mikromart.com (http://www.mikromart.com)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 04, 2013, 10:51 pm
Since when is Radio Shack reasonably priced?  Went to the MALL store and got a Seeed Studio Proto Shield for $9.99!

Okay- Credit where credit is due.

Seeedstudio-- the protoshield kit is awesome.  This is a great deal at ten bucks.
I expected the board headers and such, and not much else.  However, they also toss in an extremely useful collection of common components:  two red and two green LEDs, a bicolor LED, resistors for the LEDs, a 10k pot, two 40-strips of male pin headers, a 40-strip of female header, a 40-strip of long male headers, spare spacers, four tactile switches and two slide switches, and a USB socket.  That's a heck of a lot for ten bucks!!!

I will be grabbing these again!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wizdum on Mar 05, 2013, 12:06 am
I finally bought an ISP for burning bootloaders, lol. Its apparently based on the USB ASP. Cost $7 on ebay.

I also bought a used server rack with UPS, 6 servers, a DAS, and a bunch of other junk. I'm probably going to use it to test an arduino based datacenter monitoring system.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 07, 2013, 02:42 am
Just got a partial shipment on what may be my last order from DX (DealeXtreme).
Got 50 40-pin header strips (steel, not brass pins), 10 keychain SD-micro/USB adapters and 3 IR signal receivers and a bag of jumpers. Still waiting on 10 2 mW laser modules (because at 45 cents ea, I'll make a use), 10 snap-in RJ-11 modular jacks, and 2 female-female 40 cm DuPont cables.

Well, I might order disc batteries from them but I can't say about that either.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 07, 2013, 02:57 am
24, yes 24 bit ADC module for less then $10. Let me count the bits, 1,2,3...yes 24 bits in all. So no need to have to amplify externally how level Wheatstone bridge type sensors, just read the millivolts, hell microvolts directly and still have more resolution then arduino's wimpy 10 bit ADC has.

We will have to see how the low noise performance of this module ends up with, as usually in the real world it's nearly impossible to actually be able to fully utilize 24 bits of resolution.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/121022291106?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 07, 2013, 05:13 am

Let me count the bits, 1,2,3...yes 24 bits in all.


Now count the possible combinations.  I will get you started...

00000000 00000000 00000000
00000000 00000000 00000001
00000000 00000000 00000010
00000000 00000000 00000011
00000000 00000000 00000100

Go!

]:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Mar 07, 2013, 05:22 am
I ordered three boards from OSHPark.  Two are Silego (http://www.silego.com/products/greenpak.html) breakout boards that I may or may not be able to solder, and one is an FTDI FT230x-based USB/Serial converter.

I'm also thinking about an FTDI VNC2-based "minishield" (USB Host), and an 8051 mini-system (But Why???), but those are aimed at Seeed/Itead (~50mm sq)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Mar 07, 2013, 10:40 pm
http://dx.com/p/diy-10x120mm-3w-270lm-3200k-warm-white-rectangle-light-strip-white-orange-dc-12-13v-191321
http://dx.com/p/diy-5w-14v-3300k-475lm-warm-white-light-cob-led-rectangle-strip-white-yellow-186201
Just one of each, so I wont be making a LED cube of them :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 13, 2013, 01:25 am
Got one of CrossRoads' ATMega1284P Duemilanova-style boards. Soldered the parts on yesterday (except the FTDI header because I've ordered a USB board to go there).

The SMD soldering is challenging (that fuse kept escaping!), and I had trouble getting the voltage regulators soldered onto the heat sinks. Still, looks good, works fine. :)

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399u.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 13, 2013, 01:34 am

Got one of CrossRoads' ATMega1284P Duemilanova-style boards. Soldered the parts on yesterday (except the FTDI header because I've ordered a USB board to go there).

The SMD soldering is challenging (that fuse kept escaping!), and I had trouble getting the voltage regulators soldered onto the heat sinks. Still, looks good, works fine. :)

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399u.jpg)



Lookin' good. I bought two of those blank PCB when Bob made them available. Built just one up so far and real happy with it. I didn't mount any regulators to mine yet, just jumpered Vcc to the DC jack and plug a regulated +5vdc to it. I'm using one of those cheap Asian CP2101 serial cables and it works fine.

Be sure to make the the small change to the bubuino variant file: pins_arduino.h or the pin mapping for the analog pins will be wrong:

Code: [Select]

// #define analogPinToChannel(p)    ( (p) < NUM_ANALOG_INPUTS ? NUM_ANALOG_INPUTS - (p) : -1 )
#define analogPinToChannel(p)       ( (p) < NUM_ANALOG_INPUTS ? (NUM_ANALOG_INPUTS-1) - (p) : -1 )


Might be a few other changes to the maniac supplied files, I don't recall at the moment.

EDIT: Some people were having reliability problems with the serial port working on the 1284P DIP (but not on bobuino boards!) and lots of different fixes were tried to different effectiveness, but what seemed to nail it for experiencing such problems is changing the low fuse byte to use full swing oscillator: bobuino.bootloader.low_fuses=0xf7
So probably a good change to make on general purposes.

EDIT2: By the way getting a 644P working on this board is a piece of cake just add new board entry:

Quote

##############################################################


bobuino644.name=Bobuino 644P optiboot
bobuino644.upload.protocol=arduino
bobuino644.upload.maximum_size=63488
bobuino644.upload.speed=115200
bobuino644.bootloader.low_fuses=0xff
bobuino644.bootloader.high_fuses=0xdc
bobuino644.bootloader.extended_fuses=0xfd
bobuino644.bootloader.path=optiboot
bobuino644.bootloader.file=optiboot_atmega644p-4-5.hex
bobuino644.bootloader.unlock_bits=0x3F
bobuino644.bootloader.lock_bits=0x0F
bobuino644.build.mcu=atmega644p
bobuino644.build.f_cpu=16000000L
#bobuino644.build.core=arduino:arduino
bobuino644.build.core=standard
bobuino644.build.variant=bobuino

##############################################################


And here is a optibootloader setup for the 644P: optiboot_atmega644p-4-5.hex

Code: [Select]

:020000000504F5
:10FC0000112484B714BE81FFF2D085E08093810077
:10FC100082E08093C00088E18093C10086E08093F9
:10FC2000C20080E18093C4008EE0CBD0209A86E0B1
:10FC300020E33CEF91E0309385002093840096BB55
:10FC4000B09BFECF189AA8958150A9F7CC24DD244B
:10FC500088248394B5E0AB2EA1E19A2EF3E0BF2E69
:10FC6000A4D0813471F4A1D0082FB1D0023811F49E
:10FC700085E005C0013811F484E001C083E08DD037
:10FC800089C0823411F484E103C0853419F485E01D
:10FC9000A6D080C0853579F488D0E82EFF2485D0A1
:10FCA000082F10E0102F00270E291F29000F111F09
:10FCB0008ED068016FC0863521F484E090D080E05A
:10FCC000DECF843609F040C070D06FD0082F6DD0E1
:10FCD00080E0C81680EED80618F4F601B7BEE895A5
:10FCE000C0E0D1E062D089930C17E1F7F0E0CF16C5
:10FCF000F0EEDF0618F0F601B7BEE89568D007B65B
:10FD000000FCFDCFA601A0E0B1E02C9130E01196FF
:10FD10008C91119790E0982F8827822B932B129625
:10FD2000FA010C0187BEE89511244E5F5F4FF2E0A7
:10FD3000A030BF0751F7F601A7BEE89507B600FC53
:10FD4000FDCF97BEE89526C08437B1F42ED02DD0D4
:10FD5000F82E2BD03CD0F601EF2C8F010F5F1F4FF8
:10FD600084911BD0EA94F801C1F70894C11CD11CFE
:10FD7000FA94CF0CD11C0EC0853739F428D08EE10F
:10FD80000CD086E90AD08AE07ACF813511F488E078
:10FD900018D01DD080E101D063CF982F8091C00092
:10FDA00085FFFCCF9093C60008958091C00087FF27
:10FDB000FCCF8091C00084FD01C0A8958091C60051
:10FDC0000895E0E6F0E098E1908380830895EDDF08
:10FDD000803219F088E0F5DFFFCF84E1DECF1F939A
:10FDE000182FE3DF1150E9F7F2DF1F91089580E04B
:08FDF000E8DFEE27FF2709946C
:040000030000FC00FD
:00000001FF



Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 13, 2013, 04:03 am
I bought a few of these for $8:

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/261132296135

MAX7219 chip plus a 8x8 LED plus PCB (not assembled).

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399v.jpg)

The MAX7219 alone is around $19 for one from Farnell. OK, it's $8 if you buy 100.

But this kit includes the 64-LED display as well! And the circuit board. And two capacitors and a resistor. And the edge connectors. And the chip socket. And socket strips for the LED display.

They are designed to be daisy-chained (haven't quite got that sorted yet).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 13, 2013, 04:28 am

Be sure to make the the small change to the bubuino variant file: pins_arduino.h or the pin mapping for the analog pins will be wrong:

Code: [Select]

// #define analogPinToChannel(p)    ( (p) < NUM_ANALOG_INPUTS ? NUM_ANALOG_INPUTS - (p) : -1 )
#define analogPinToChannel(p)       ( (p) < NUM_ANALOG_INPUTS ? (NUM_ANALOG_INPUTS-1) - (p) : -1 )


Might be a few other changes to the maniac supplied files, I don't recall at the moment.

EDIT: Some people were having reliability problems with the serial port working on the 1284P DIP (but not on bobuino boards!) and lots of different fixes were tried to different effectiveness, but what seemed to nail it for experiencing such problems is changing the low fuse byte to use full swing oscillator: bobuino.bootloader.low_fuses=0xf7
So probably a good change to make on general purposes.


Thanks for the suggestions.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Mar 13, 2013, 05:37 am
Over the past weekend I went to a local hamfest and picked up a Heathkit ET-3400; it's basically a small 8-bit (Motorola 6800) computer with 512 bytes of memory, some LEDs, a hex keyboard (and 7-segment hex display), ROM monitor software (so you can enter assembler opcodes, and debug, etc) - plus a breadboarding area (which a previous owner had set up a 6821 PIA interface). Also got the manuals for it...

I spent $50.00 for it; Yeah - I could've gotten a Raspberry Pi or a Mega for cheaper - but I can guarantee you neither would be as cool as this monstrosity...hehehe.

:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Mar 13, 2013, 05:44 am
Quote
picked up a Heathkit ET-3400;


Back in the day I had a Micro Professor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro-Professor_MPF-I) which was a similar thing for the Z80 (Z80-based CP/M machines were in vogue). I got a few extras for it, like a Tiny-Basic chip.

Bloody thing got stolen from my office while I was on leave...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 13, 2013, 06:36 am


The MAX7219 alone is around $19 for one from Farnell. OK, it's $8 if you buy 100.



http://www.ebay.com/itm/250828820487 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/250828820487)


10 pcs MAX7219CNG -                                                                            $4.80, free shipping.

Just sent an order to them, also got:

2PCS Arduino NRF24L01+ Wireless Transceiver Module                            $2.60
10PCS OPTOCOUPLERS FAIRCHILD/MOTOROLA DIP-6 MOC3041                 $3.79
1 Channel Isolated 5V Relay Module                                                        $2.18
1PCS IC ATMEL DIP-28 ATMEGA328-PU                                                     $3.99 (this is a little high)

and a couple other doodads.. however, when I saw that price you said for 7219's, I figured you may want to snap a few of these up!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 13, 2013, 07:00 am
This is just getting insane. I wonder if they work?

Anyway just ordered 20 for under $10 including free shipping.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: rvasque on Mar 13, 2013, 07:21 am
I've ordered so-cheap-its-unbelievable chips from these China sellers. I got some MSGEQ7s

All of them have issues. Some do not work at all. Some work, then fail after some time. They seem like factory rejects... chips that fail QA testing, or not up to par with the published specs.

For personal use, I guess it's okay to gamble with chips from China ebay sellers. But if you're planning on selling your finished product to others, I'd avoid these chinese suppliers that sell chips lower than their retail prices.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 13, 2013, 01:41 pm
Well, I'm well-known for my bottom-feeding on ebay.. and if the device being made was critical in any way, I would use "real" parts purchased from a reputable retailer.. but in reality, almost none of my projects are something I would directly sell or depend upon for any real purpose.  I will buy "as-is" and "NOS" as a priority, knowing the risks.  The fact is, I feel more comfortable buying from a Shenzen seller with twenty thousand sales on ebay than I do with a Los Angeles seller with sixty sales.. I trust the Shenzen volume seller to care about their reputation more than the new account from California.

In the years I have been grabbing ebay dregs, I only once have gotten trash- a four pack of ATMEGA88's that wouldn't do a thing- and the seller refunded.  

"polida" (the vendor for this particular deal) is one that I have bought a number of things from- and if you don't need customer service (language barrier) I haven't had any problems with and tends to ship pretty quickly.  I think their angle is sheer volume, if you look at their total number of customers it's in the tens of thousands.  

Happily, most of these vendors seem to know their customers are going to be hobbyists and the like- they tend to have a lot of the stuff we tend to buy.  Modules of various types (sensors, voltage regulators, SD card, ethernet, etc) can be ridiculously cheap- I have gotten ethernet modules for $3, Bluetooth for $2, and stepper motor controller (ULN2003) plus stepper motor for $3.  Outside of the modules, you can always bottom feed on certain items- 2N3904/3906 transistors, ULN2003A Darlington Arrays, LED's of all types, MOSFET's, and a dozen different "uino" clones.  I had to dedicate my "real" Arduino Duemilanove to a project for a couple months, so I decided to give (reference to counterfeit product removed by moderator) a try.. they are one of the larger clone outfits.  Their prices are hard to beat also, I got a Uno clone, a Proto Shield with 65 jumpers and a mini breadboard, and an LCD keypad (looks suspiciously like liudr's design) shield... all of it for $39 shipped.  It's coming from California, so shipping isn't even the couple of weeks of waiting that ordering from China is.. it's just the normal 2-3 days for mail.  Today, I am making a 24-channel PWM controller (8 channels of RGB) using AT90S4414.. I bought two TUBES (twenty MCU's, 40-pin AVRs) for $7 TOTAL a while back (I just realized to myself that amounts to just over a penny per GPIO pin!).  I have been planning to using them to make  quick and dirty SPI-to-1602 LCD interfaces, should work great for the purpose.  I am still looking for a good use for the half tube of Dallas 12887+ clocks I bought for TWO BUCKS also.  Yes, I know all of these components are likely to be factory seconds or overstocks- but as I said- in several years and dozens of purchases, only ONE has ever been outright bad.  One thing is for sure-  the vendors take take "Feedback" very seriously and will bend over backwards even on a deal to avoid getting bad feedback, it seems.  I wouldn't try to "take advantage" of that, but it does seem they care about those stars a lot.  

I will give a report on the (reference to counterfeit product removed by moderator) "uino" when it arrives- but I see no reason for it to be anything other than a good ole basic Uno..
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 13, 2013, 06:02 pm

Well, I'm well-known for my bottom-feeding on ebay..


Because you keep telling us so! And then you provide the details to prove you're not just a bottom-feeder but an effing hero-class bottom-feeder to boot!

Tell me please, do you use any glass cloth in your epoxy work?

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 13, 2013, 06:19 pm
Hehehe..well, it's usually to let folks know when I stumble across something particularly crazily priced (like the 7219's, the recent logic mosfets, etc).

The thing is, I am killing hours when I am cruising that stuff out.  Long story short, I have an illness which puts me in the loo for up to five hours a day, sometimes hours at a stretch, many times in tne middle of the night.  The internet is what keeps you from going insane... eventually I made kind of a game of browsing for things that slip through the cracks.  The reality is that I am surprised how FEW items are garbage.. at the prices I am going for, sometimes from unknown vendors- many times at what has to be a loss.  I expect a certain of garbage- and have found that the amount of garbage is surprisingly small.  Vendors don't want bad feedback, it's poison to an ebay vendor.  I think a certain number of these sales are put out there simply to solicit positive feedback- and I'm okay with that, as long as I am getting a good deal, I'm happy to praise them for it :)

It may seem I get things cheaply, but trust me, if you incorporate the hours it takes to find these things, it is anything but cheap!

I've used fiberglass... I have also used cotton gauze, twist ties, and even formed a pour mold of duct tape for use in creating structures never intended or recommended to be composed of an adhesive.  If there is a wrong way to do it, rest assured, I have done it or am planning to.... I absolutely love things like epoxy, PVC pipe, duct tape and heat-formable plastics (even those not actually designed to be formed).  Another good starting point for inappropriate construction is utility and junction boxes from hardware stores.. and never forget threaded rod.  A discount store up the street sells hot melt glue in three temp ranges, big bag of sticks for a couple of bucks.  Throw in some drywall screws and plywood, you pretty much can build a mockery of anything decently made.  Some day I'll have a 3d printer, until then, pass the epoxy and staplegun...

I'm the guy that mounts heat sinks with hotmelt glue and an attitude of letting fate decide if the magic blue genie will emerge... I actually HAVE mounted power LED's (twelve one watters) to a chunk of a floppy drive made of a hunk of aluminum as a heatsink with hotmelt glue.  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLTUyWK4Nf0

Doing things the right way is almost sinful when tinkering, in my eyes.  Production, work- another story, real work you do right.  For my own personal use, I almost prefer the slight air of danger every time something is powered up...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Mar 13, 2013, 07:53 pm
I had to give up on hot glue.  Darn stuff gives way in the AZ heat.  Now, that epoxy putty that come in a clear cylinder; that stuff is the bomb.

And, you keep looking, I've jumped in on some of your finds and look forward to doing it again.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 13, 2013, 08:07 pm
Quote
I've jumped in on some of your finds and look forward to doing it again.


I too have succumbed to a few of focalist's E-bay finds. The problem is I just order them because the price was so killer and put them away in a parts drawer somewhere and a month or two later I have no memory of what I bought, so It's like I don't have them at all if I don't remember I have them, right?

Darn you focalist.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 13, 2013, 08:16 pm

Quote
I've jumped in on some of your finds and look forward to doing it again.


I too have succumbed to a few of focalist's E-bay finds. The problem is I just order them because the price was so killer and put them away in a parts drawer somewhere and a month or two later I have no memory of what I bought, so It's like I don't have them at all if I don't remember I have them, right?

Darn you focalist.

Lefty


I have sort of the same problem.  The difference, I think, is that I keep things very well organized.  I keep smaller parts in four of the larger units shown on this page (two each of the two types):

http://www.akro-mils.com/Products/Home-Office/Hardware/Hardware-Storage-Cabinets.aspx

I label each bin.  For small quantities of small parts, I can get two into each small bin using the dividers.  For parts that will not easily fit in these cabinets, I use Sterilite stackable modular boxes from WalMart.  These are great, they stack really, really well, even different sizes because the smaller boxes stack 2 or four onto larger boxes.  A lot of thought was given to dimensioning these boxes correctly.

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Sterilite-2.7-Quart-Latch-Box-Set-of-6/20699631

WalMart stores sell these individually.

I label everything and, what's more, I go through it once every month or so just to refresh my memory of what I have and maybe some projects I intended to do and forgot.  

"Hmmm...  what were those ferrites for?"   :smiley-surprise:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 13, 2013, 08:20 pm
Quote
The difference, I think, is that I keep things very well organized.


Well see right there is a problem, as I'm not and at my age probably never will get organized.
:D
Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 13, 2013, 08:23 pm
Lefty, that's Geekmas!

Opening a drawer and finding those five bubble envelopes you got, paid a dollar each for, and forgot-- only to open and find the inspiration for the next wildly useless portzebie.  Why do I have an industrial ultrasonic transducer designed for use in measuring the volume in tankers?  Because it was a buck (though lists for a thousand!).  What will I do with it?  Stick it on a shelf, and then pull it out when a ping sensor (at five bucks) would work.  I saved four bucks, even if it is a thousand dollar part, actually :)

It's the fact that many of these are so low cost that makes it possible or reasonable to lose things in a drawer for six months until Geekmas... it's not too hard to forget three items costing a total of two dollars that take a month to arrive, especially if you were buying them to shelve them in the first place :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 13, 2013, 08:25 pm
I've used sawdust and carpenter's glue to make light mountings. Had a neighbor who made rockets from glass cloth and epoxy but I'd have to do major re-arranging here to begin at it.

Another mix I have yet to try is glass strands in concrete.

3D printer... a dream for me. I want one that can lay fiber and wire, maybe print sockets.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 13, 2013, 08:43 pm

3D printer... a dream for me. I want one that can lay fiber and wire, maybe print sockets.


The first thing that I am going to print with my 3D printer is a 3D printer.  And then return the first one.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 13, 2013, 09:13 pm

Had a neighbor who made rockets from glass cloth and epoxy but I'd have to do major re-arranging here to begin at it.

Another mix I have yet to try is glass strands in concrete.


I've recently been intrigued by the invention of Concrete Cloth.  Cloth impregnated with concrete- they even make it as bags, with an internal bladder, as an instant hardened shelter.  Leaf blower to inflate it (like a bouncy house) and then spray it with water, and it hardens overnight.  Sterilizable, hardened, drillable for utility installation, all of it.  They also can unroll it and make walkways, dams, runoff channels, you name it.  Amazingly useful invention:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LBHVKFCoYFc

It's one of those "Geez, I wish I had thought of that" things, we've been doing the same thing forever with fiberglass and paper mache, why it's never been done before now with concrete is just that "Aha!" or "I wonder.." moment, I suppose.. it was invented by university students... and I look at it and instantly imagine it would be a PERFECT shop space.  Maybe it's the extremely thinly veiled desire to have a skull-shaped island with a dome, or an underground lair, but for some reason this has that "madman with a soldering iron" feel, don't you think?  Suffice to say, I think the stuff makes it worth trying out for yourself, in a poorly done hobby way.  Fiberglass matting saturated with portland cement and probably some type of latex (I would use exterior latex semigloss paint.  Always add latex to cement, imo- the cost is worth the durability.) would probably work for starters and would be cheap enough to try.  Home depot, ten to fifteen bucks you should be able to get a sack of portland cement and the cloth and a quart of noname latex paint..  Heck, they are using canvas, but multilayered.  I might consider using the fiber roll padding used for carpet backing possibly.  In any case, sounds like cheap and easy enough to try...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 13, 2013, 10:05 pm
I wonder what parts of the USA that thing would be building code compliant for a permanent installation, which I guess is the intent.  Still, very cool.  I didn't have that vid on with sound.  Are there any specs on that like how much weight it can hold on the roof before it collapses?

edit....  Found it:

Quote
Have you done any analytical testing on CCS?

The University of Bath has completed Finite Element Analysis of CCS50 structures. The result showed that the shelter can withstand all specified load cases including a person standing on the roof, uneven snow loading and Hurricane force winds. In addition it proved that the shelter can be earth-bermed with up to 0.75m of wet sand on the sides of the structure and 0.5m on the roof.


They didn't answer if adding gun ports would significantly weaken the structure though.   ]:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 13, 2013, 10:22 pm
Well, they say it's supposed to last ten years.. in many places that isn't considered a permanent structure.  I know here in Massachusetts, it has to have a foundation and be expected to have a certain lifespan to be considered a permanent structure as relates to property laws.  Especially considering there's no reinforcing bars or anything, that's impressive lifespan for a temporary building!  The ribbing where the fabric is stitched forms the load bearing members of the structure.

I have no idea of the price of the things, but in many cases I am sure that it is a fraction of the cost of virtually any other form of construction.  The one they show most often is something like 50 square meters... that's a pretty decent area, requiring framing and such with any other construction method.  The thing is easier to assemble than a tent.. only takes one person.

I also look at the smaller one, and having grown up in the Midwest where tornadoes are a common thing... if you anchored that thing (and I mean really anchor it) it's rounded shape makes it an almost ideal tornado shelter.  Heck, the ability to put up a feedbarn anywhere in a single day with one man... what's that worth to a farm?

I have one of the prefab steel backyard lawnmower and junk sheds, it's running down to the end of it's life- I understand it's over twenty years old.  When I looked at what it costs to replace it, you are looking at a thousand dollars or more in many cases- and I know from a mechanic friend who has done it- don't do the "assemble it yourself" kits, ever.  Even cheap sheds are five to seven hundred dollars, and even if you just set out to build one yourself out of lumber, you are looking at a few hundred for even the most rudimentary-- and a lot of labor and knowhow to do it if you want it to last a decade or two.  If one of the smaller ones was say, five hunded dollars-- it would be a real contender in that market.  I know I would think about it... and in the meantime, I take window screen and lay it across the rust holes and hit it with that spray rubber coating (or automotive undercoating spray), and it'll hold for several years.. I am up to three years on one such patch :)

Another very interesting material I have a yen to play with is UV-cure polymers.  In all honesty, I want to build a 3-d printer which utilizes this rather than extrusion.. I think managing a UV LED or laser diode is a lot easier than a feed mechanism and temperature controlled nozzles.  Just pump the liquid polymer and expose (harden) it on very precise locations, the extra runs down and is refed into the supply.  The media management becomes a simple pump, the "print head" an LED or laser diode.  All that's left is a gantry.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Mar 14, 2013, 01:56 am
Quote
Another mix I have yet to try is glass strands in concrete.

I did this a couple of months ago.  A contractor I had working on my house years back didn't put enough foundation under one part and the room started to drop.  I had a crew (shovel...that much...not me) dig it out under the existing foundation and then out three feet to form a walkway.   I filled it with fiberglass reinforced 3000 lb concrete and rebar.  Really can't speak to the survivability, but the stuff has totally stopped movement on that part of the house.

But I have got to experiment with that building idea.  I'll start small, maybe a flower pot, planter, dog house, something on that scale.  It's just too cool
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 14, 2013, 04:07 am

The ribbing where the fabric is stitched forms the load bearing members of the structure.


When it is done, the shell is the load bearing part.
And wow, call it a 'bomb' shelter. But it's not proper evil genius without an underground complex.

Concrete has enormous compressive strength, good but not great shear strength and very weak tensile strength. Add wire or glass fiber and suddenly you have super-crete.

I learned wire and concrete in design school. Less than 3/8" thick welding rod, stainless steel screen and concrete easily deflected a 2 1/2 lb sledge on a 2 ft wide model. Tubing, chicken wire and concrete has been used to make ocean-going 40+ ft boats with 3/4" thick hulls (except where the 2 1/2" tubing was). The stuff just gives and flexes back. If you break it, you push the loose stuff out and patch it with concrete, which is kind of like what you do with a fiberglass canoe that's been slammed into a rock.

I have to wonder how thin the glass cuttings and concrete can go. It might work for enclosures and it might not.

Oh yeah, use driveway sealer when you're done. Concrete needs some water (the term I was given is water of hydration) to maintain bonds. If it dries out, it loses strength.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Mar 14, 2013, 04:32 am
one of the best ways to waterproof concrete is PVA, water it down about 4 or 5 to 1, let it churn in the mixer for a while.
This is a great way to waterproof ponds.

Another strengthening idea the Australian Defense Force found is wood wool, sawdust isn't good enough, you need "curly" bits.
Give them a soak in a PVA/water wash, then apply them to your first layer of concrete on a "chicken wire" base, then trowel another layer of concrete over.

Other methods are polypropylene or glass fibres mixed in.

Glass reenforced concrete is really strong, they use it here on our street racing circuit curbings.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 14, 2013, 06:46 am
I've wondered about wood splinters as a cheap alternative to glass or wire. Shavings? Sounds good. I only use sawdust with glue to make putty, not crete.

The way I was first taught is a frame with layers of chicken wire loosely tied and the concrete pressed in taking care there's no air bubbles. It can get very thin and take high loads. That was 1974-75.

I see the use of 2 to 3 inch wire or glass fiber strands touted since. It can be poured, molded, and now erected dry and hosed down. The amount of handwork has gone way down.

Also at home supply stores, check out Hardie Board and Hardie flooring, especially the flooring.



Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Mar 14, 2013, 10:12 am

I've recently been intrigued by the invention of Concrete Cloth.

Hmm.  It's not such a new idea anymore.  First shows up on the Internet in 2005, having won a prize in a 2004 design contest: http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,66872,00.html

And most recently (8 years later) looking about the same:
http://laughingsquid.com/concrete-canvas-shelter-an-inflatable-concrete-building/

So why isn't this showing up all over?  (perhaps I expect change to be too rapid, being in high-tech and all.)  A bit of searching, and it sort-of looks like the "inflatable building" isn't quite the killer app that it looks like in the demo.  Perhaps if you can deliver and position 500+lbs of concrete, provide running water for hydration and electricity for inflation, the other theoretical advantages of the scheme aren't so compelling anymore :-(  It looks like  they and other licensees are doing other neat stuff, though.  http://www.concretecanvas.co.uk/Images/ccgengallery/index.html
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 14, 2013, 04:40 pm
The advantages of strength and wear are not just theory. That cloth is just a way to go about it.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 16, 2013, 01:47 am
I will give a report on the (reference to counterfeit product removed by moderator) "uino" when it arrives- but I see no reason for it to be anything other than a good ole basic Uno..


EDIT:  Just noticed the reference to it being counterfeit!  If I might ask (going to go and read the permissible use of the design page) what specifically about their clones isn't allowed?  Last thing I want is to help a counterfeiter.. isn't there licensed clone uinos?  I assumed.... Don't SparkFun and LadyAda among others make licensed clones?  And, if this is a "problematic" clone brand while others are licensed, is there a list of vendors that HAVE licensed the design properly?  I'd of course avoid using or praising a vendor that is cheating the system.  As an end user on a shoestring, I often go for the cheapest, but it's not worth hurting the Arduino project for!  If there's an "offender's list" or a "certified list", I've not ever seen it, other than the references to SparkFun and a couple others.

LCD/Keypad Shield:  Their example code leaves a little to be desired, the lib works well but wasn't documented out for use (on the Keypad/LCD shield).  They use the design where the five buttons return a different value on A0, and the lcd is wired to pins D4-D9 for use in 4-bit mode with the standard libs.  Cute, solid implementation.  It's mass produced cheap stuff of course, but it seems at least WELL mass produced.  They provide no docs on the device, their website link could really use to be better documented.. but for the price- awesome.  Because there is the doc problems, I'd not recommend it for a total novice.

Uno:  Solid clone.  Very clearly their logo screened on back, reference to www.arduino.cc, came with what looks to be about a half meter shielded cable.  Started "blink" from original plugin, driver wasn't a problem, no problems uploading and using a couple of basic sketches, then popped on the LCD shield and loaded up their demo sketch, worked with no problems.  Again, no documents whatsoever, but since it is a clone, Arduino site is plenty.  Not much to say really, it's an Uno by all measures.

ProtoShield:  First off I will say that I preferred the protoshield kit from SeeedStudio that I actually purchased at a Radio Shack for $9.99.  I prefer to solder on the headers that I want to use, while this is more like the genuine, with the top and bottom headers already attached and two LED's, a RESET passthrough button, and a spare button.  It also came with one of the little breadboards that fit between the headers and a mittfull (supposed to be sixty five of them, not going to bother to count) of male-to-male standard jumpers.  Again, it's a solid clone of the "real thing", no logos on it at all.  

Got the three of them for $39 shipped, I have to say, other than feeling a small twinge of guilt at not having bought "the real thing" this time around- not bad at all, and between the three look like they would make a solid foundation for a project.  Most of the time these days I just use raw chips and USBASP, but I have a couple of shield-based things and wanted to see how one of the clones measures up to the real thing...

EDIT:  Interested into seeing what's up with the clone permissibility and all that.  Had wondered about it, as there are quite a few out there in terms of makers.  Having just read the FAQ, I'm really curious as to what they've done - the whole clone thing never made sense to me, in that clones are sure to be cheaper than the original, thereby undercutting your own sales.  Philosphical I figured it must be.  The only thing that looks like it COULD be a violation of a copyright (to my eye, anyway) might be that the infinity "big" logo that gets cut off by the edge of the board.  What's the scoop?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 16, 2013, 02:05 am
Another reason I like my Teensy 2.0's, they do pay towards the project and cost less even w/pins.

But mostly it's about AVR w/USB including a Mega2560-class version.
I don't even try to solder pins to those after I &%@$-ed up one of their micro-SD adapters.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 16, 2013, 02:32 am
Quote

EDIT:  Just noticed the reference to it being counterfeit!  If I might ask (going to go and read the permissible use of the design page) what specifically about their clones isn't allowed?  Last thing I want is to help a counterfeiter.. isn't there licensed clone uinos?  I assumed.... Don't SparkFun and LadyAda among others make licensed clones?  And, if this is a "problematic" clone brand while others are licensed, is there a list of vendors that HAVE licensed the design properly?  I'd of course avoid using or praising a vendor that is cheating the system.  As an end user on a shoestring, I often go for the cheapest, but it's not worth hurting the Arduino project for!


As both the hardware and software files for most all the arduino products are open sourced, anyone is free to build and even sell 'clones', no license or permission required. What is 'protected' is the Arduino name as a trademark and that is where most of the Asian clones cross the legal line making no attempt to change the branding stuff on the board and describing their boards as Arduino boards. A few to play by the rules and change the name and silk printed trademark stuff and describing them as compatible to arduino.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 16, 2013, 03:21 am
EDIT:  Just noticed the reference to it being counterfeit!  If I might ask (going to go and read the permissible use of the design page) what specifically about their clones isn't allowed?


The specific products you referenced may or may not be a problem.  The company in question is selling a product that clearly violates the Arduino trademark.  In other words, they claim one of their products is an authenticate Arduino and it is not.

Sidebar: Lying about the country of origin violates U.S. law (claiming the board is "Made in Italy" when it is not) and, in my opinion, is despicable.

Quote
As an end user on a shoestring, I often go for the cheapest, but it's not worth hurting the Arduino project for!  If there's an "offender's list" or a "certified list", I've not ever seen it, other than the references to SparkFun and a couple others.


Which is, of course, not a problem.  The Arduino folks have made it quite clear that they expect less expensive compatible boards to be produced and have even provided details on how to make such boards.

Quote
If there's an "offender's list" or a "certified list", I've not ever seen it, other than the references to SparkFun and a couple others.


No offenders list.  This is the official distributors list... http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Buy  When in doubt you can always ask... http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ContactUs
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 16, 2013, 05:34 am
Good to know.  I do have to say that in this case, it's clearly marked as their own product, marked made in china, and denotes itself as "XXXXXXX Board model Uno" (I'll post a pic, prolly tomorrow, of the back where the imprinting is done).. it isn't trying to pass itself off as an "official" board.  Have they done that in the past?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 16, 2013, 06:03 am
Have they done that in the past?


Yes.

But their past conduct is irrelevant.  They currently have a board for sale that violates the trademark and is described as an "Arduino Uno R3".
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 16, 2013, 10:21 am
Very uncool.  Glad you let me know, they won't be getting my business again.  I just browsed their site and found the one you are talking about-  that's not the model I ordered or got.. mine was (and is) clearly a clone, and the only logo associated with Arduino is the big infinity on the back, and a line of text "www.arduino.cc" under the Made in China stamp.  Everywhere else is prominently their own logo.  Even the infinity on the back doesn't have the +- symbols.  I purchased mine through their ebay store, which doesn't carry the Arduino branded board (I don't think).. so all I ever saw was clearly a clone.

Very strange, too, as they have their own branded everything- including the xxxxx Uno I got (obviously I am substituting the x's for the name).  I would assume that given the standards, the device I got is "okay" in terms of branding.. but if that device that they are selling ISN'T a real Uno when they say it is..  It just doesn't make a lot of sense to me.  They also have no other device they claim is the "real thing".  Why wouldn't you go for the higher priced Mega?  Leonardo?  I mean, if you are going to steal, make it worth it, you know?  So strange.

What they show on that page is clearly intended to be an Arduino Uno, including replication of the trademarked logo.

Especially since they have right next to it in terms of boards and such, their own branded items- why the heck would they do that?  Had I seen that device, not the one I got, I would have believed it to be authentic.  Like maybe they would carry the "real thing" and theirs next to it to show theirs was cheaper, you know as an advertising thing or whatever.  Talk about cutting your own throat!  I was JUST praising the maker on the overall quality of their own branded items, to boot.  I went from "Gee, I'd buy that again, maybe it's worth looking at" coming out of me to this.  How much repeat business did they just lose from me, and anyone else who read this?  I suppose, we can be cynical and say "probably less than they are making selling fakes in the first place..." but then why would you put the UNDERPRICED identical, other than branding, board (visually, anyway) next to it, if you are going to go through the trouble and risk of outright faking the real thing?  Why carry anything with your own name? I mean, if you were a counterfeiter, would you really stop at the ATM to pull out real money for groceries, EXCEPT the cash for the eggs, which you pay for with bogus bills... but only the eggs.?

That right there is just plain dumb on their part.. I mean I could see selling the "real McCoy" to highlight your own alternative product (hopefully selling your own I would think).. at even a slightly ABOVE retail price.  Dang.  And we are sure that they haven't bought and retail those, for the purpose of showing a price point comparison to their own?  It just doesn't add up.  Why do yourself like that?  I mean, there's quite a few Arduino enthusiasts, but in reality, it's overall a small number.  Word travels fast.  Selling an outright fake is just crazy.  They HAD to know this very discussion would be the result.. and I assume that someone is throwing the appropriate rocks at their windows?

Makes no sense to me at all, but thanks for pointing it out!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Mar 16, 2013, 01:58 pm
A couple of things come to mind.

Clearly, violation of a trademark or copyright is not ok.

I also don't see the reason for cloners to just copy the arduino designs. As others have pointed out, there are improvement opportunities such as the power supply and input protections (Ruggeduino), I/o (iteadstudio Ethernet / SD/NRf+ unit), etc. for many different designs to coexist happily. Whether you consider the form factor to be important or not, there are alternatives to the official arduino designs that are as good as the official gear. 

I understand how blindly copying a design with low cost parts may be lower-risk endeavor but the profit margins are likely tiny too.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 16, 2013, 05:33 pm

They also have no other device they claim is the "real thing".  Why wouldn't you go for the higher priced Mega?  Leonardo?  I mean, if you are going to steal, make it worth it, you know?  So strange.


Couple things.

I think they have production lines using and warehouses full of older parts they're selling off cheap just to hit certain marks on production economies. Tooling and setting up is expensive. You gotta complete so many runs to pay that off. What can I say? I wrote estimation and bidding packages back when we still made things here, made fixtures and jigs, set up and worked parts myself.

That was in a job shop where a shorts run was 10's of something. The real gains are in the millions+ and thinking way down the road.
But what a lot of places don't think about is change, often for the sake of change as much as anything regardless of market rhetoric. The old stuff that does what it always did and suits a huge range of tasks becomes a matter of fashion whether it's clothes, cars or chips.

One reason I got into Arduino instead of using the money to upgrade my PC is because Arduino is simple and I liked my time with simpler computing and know it has value. I can program a 328P with an UNO and use that same DIP 328P all on it's lonesome to do amazing things for cheap.

I also think that the language and culture barrier West to East does count. Let them know with some tact and they may change the labeling. How many things of theirs have we grabbed onto labels and used without knowing the full significance? Probably more than we know if we include corporate interactions. As a country we can't even get terms between our own sub-cultures straight much of the time, with predictable (ongoing bigot-test) results, so give them a chance!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 17, 2013, 10:14 am
I would assume that given the standards, the device I got is "okay" in terms of branding..


Absolutely.

Quote
Why wouldn't you go for the higher priced Mega?  Leonardo?  I mean, if you are going to steal, make it worth it, you know?  So strange.


For months (possibly a year) all they sold was counterfeit boards.  I ran them off about a half-dozen times.  I assume the board in question is old stock they are trying to dump.

Quote
And we are sure that they haven't bought and retail those, for the purpose of showing a price point comparison to their own?


Yup.  They are counterfeit.  If you look closely at the picture the font face is different on some of the labels.  (I also have confirmation from the Arduino folks.)

Quote
It just doesn't add up.  Why do yourself like that?


From my previous interactions with them I would say it's because they don't care.  As long as people buy their stuff (and people do seem to be buying their stuff) they don't care that they are deceiving their customers.  I guess that makes them greedy.

Quote
Makes no sense to me at all, but thanks for pointing it out!


No problem.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Chagrin on Mar 17, 2013, 09:39 pm
I think they have production lines using and warehouses full of older parts they're selling off cheap just to hit certain marks on production economies.


I think they just get the parts at a lower price straight from the distributors. Here in the US it's not uncommon to see things like prescription drugs priced much higher domestically then they are sold overseas. Why would electronic parts -- where competition is much, much higher in China -- not see a similar price decline. The manufacturers have to price them to match the market.

You look at all those cheap LM2596 modules on eBay and there's no way to build one yourself that cheaply; you just can't get the LM2596 at a lower price than the entire module. Now if TI started pricing the LM2596 in China the same as they do in the US I can guarantee those boards wouldn't be built with TI LM2596's; any number of fabs would quickly duplicate the chip.

Yeah it's possible that there's a warehouse out there with a few million overstock LM2596s, but the chip is pretty ubiquitous and still in full production. I can't imagine anyone needing to liquidate it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 18, 2013, 03:01 am
You get big price breaks by buying insane quantities or by licensing manufacture and making same.

What we individuals get is the small quantity (less than 100,000's, less than 1,000's) price jacked up to retail levels. If I can make it at a factory for $1, retail is $4+ to whatever cloud in the sky the market will bear... if the price threatens to drop then like oil and gas it will be exported cheaper to mass-buyers offshore. Look at how they do food here. If the price might drop then milk gets spilled down creeks, wheat gets burned or sent to Russia and oranges get rolled into the outgoing tide. Hail Mammon, guardian of Profit!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 18, 2013, 04:08 am
In general regarding cheap components, I try the less cynical view that maybe these lowball 'gimme' prices are simply a loss leader.. Meaning you buy something super cheap, you like it, and come back and buy more stuff but at retail.  If they lose fifty cents to get a sale that turns the net into a fifty dollar profit- "taking a loss" is worth it even at a 1% success rate.  I do in fact browse the items of sellers that have the lowball items... getting a potential customer to browse your catalog is the holy grail for a mail order seller...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 18, 2013, 08:59 pm
Okay, so now onto something more fun.  So I was up to my usual shenanigans, and have purchased (for a buck including shipping) : a "North Atlantic 801 Synchro Panel Meter".

This was one the of the first successful "dollar fishing" bids in quite some time, so I went and looked this thing up.

It appears this is a seriously useful device for CNC and that type of thing- it's a display unit for sensing and displaying angle of rotation.  From the documentation blurb:  

"The 800 & 801 are Synchro/Resolver Panel Meters, with resolutions up to 0.01°, and accuracies up to 0.03°. Both Synchro or Resolver mode can be programmed and the unit operates over a broad frequency band of 47Hz to 1200Hz. "

http://www.teknetelectronics.com/DataSheet/NORTHATLAN/WEBNORTH801.pdf (http://www.teknetelectronics.com/DataSheet/NORTHATLAN/WEBNORTH801.pdf)

What the heck is it, and how can I misuse it..that's the question.  Of course, if it's actually valuable and slipped through the cracks (has happened before) I maybe ought to looking into flipping it for a profit.  I do prefer to play with toys rather than sell them, though... but with the projects I have going on right now I really would be better off getting some profit.

There's an industrial electronics recycler and dealer next town over, they buy and sell a lot of PLC stuff- so I am hoping to take a few things over there and do a little Yankee Swap.  They have racks full of bench gear, decent hardware I could use well--  and I have several industrial electronics devices, new in packaging, that I have no use for but know are worth quite a bit.  One's an industrial ultrasound sensor- designed for measuring volume in huge tanks and the like.. I know it's worth a few hundred.  If I can swap a few of these items that I've gotten for a dollar each for a couple hundred dollars worth of bench equipment-- Win.

EDIT:  Erm-- let's see if the guy actually ships this.  After looking around a bit, the only other ones I could find are USED (this one is new in shrinkwrap) selling for $1000 and up!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 18, 2013, 09:29 pm
Quote
What the heck is it, and how can I misuse it..that's the question.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Synchro

While quite a buy for a buck, it's a pretty specialized application measurement device and probably pretty difficult to repurpose it to anything arduino useful. Maybe as trading material is it's best value. Syncros were how say a rubber position was displayed in a aircraft cockpit where the syncro motor was coupled to the rubber axis and then wired to the resolver display in the cockpit. To is measuring the phase difference between AC voltages, where the phase difference is created by the position of a shaft coupling voltage windings with an AC excitation voltage. This kind of stuff was pretty low volume thus very expensive and mostly used for military for aircraft industrial use. Make great weather vane position transmitter sender/receivers if found cheaply enough in surplus. So all you have is a receiving device so it's use as a standalone device is pretty limited.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 18, 2013, 09:38 pm
Kind of seemed that way, looking at the docs.  Well, here's to hoping that he sends it-- if they sell for a grand USED, maybe I can flip it for some stuff that will be useful for the gas valve project among other things.

That's my hope when I grab these dollar-bid items, in reality.  Of course I am hoping to find a diamond in with chaff, and sometimes I do.. however, then "mysteriously" the seller often "can't find" or otherwise backs out of the sale (which ebay gets pretty nasty on).  I've only had one real home run, a cable tv analyzer unit (like the techs use) that I got for a buck and sold for a hundred... however, if this one actually is shipped, there has to be potential for some pretty decent upside on this....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 19, 2013, 12:16 am
Quote
"The 800 & 801 are Synchro/Resolver Panel Meters, with resolutions up to 0.01°, and accuracies up to 0.03°. Both Synchro or Resolver mode can be programmed and the unit operates over a broad frequency band of 47Hz to 1200Hz. "


It might be accurate enough to survey with... remotely.

Powerball tickets are $2+ and what are the chances of getting anything back on those?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 19, 2013, 12:51 am
I just got a shipping confirmation and USPS tracking number... SOMETHING is in that box :D

In trying to price it out, I see it used for $1000, and I see the less accurate version (.05) sells for $2600.  Looks like it's used for serious precision avionics, like a remote display.. I think it connects to an encoder or synchro that provides the data.  The synchro is a distinct device, it would appear that I have gotten whole device in terms of what is sold as the unit.  Still in shrink wrap, new.

It still wouldn't be a winning Powerball ticket unless I can sell it!  Looks like it is a limited market kind of thing.  Hmmm.

EDIT: Found one that sold on ebay previously.. For $799 without its packaging.  
http://www.ebay.com/itm/North-Atlantic-800-Synchro-Resolver-Panel-Meter-4-/300722159236,  sold March 5th.

I think I may have just made a huge donation to the project funding :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Mar 19, 2013, 08:14 pm
My Gertboard arrived yesterday. It has an ATmega328P in the lower lefthand corner with the pins brought out to a 0.1" male header. It operates at 3V3 and has a 12MHz ceramic resonator. I'm sure they were trying to get the highest speed performance at 3V3 that they could but I may replace the ceramic resonator with an 8MHz unit so as to be timing compatible with one of the stock Arduinos. There are conveniently placed headers to jumper TX/RX to the appropriate ATmega pins from the Raspberry Pi if you want to. There is also a 6-pin ICSP header which you jumper for programming using avrdude from Raspberry Pi's version of the Arduino IDE.

I already have several DIY "shields" with ATmega chips on them for the Raspberry Pi because they are simple to make from standard 0.1" perfboard but this is just another way to combine the two.

I prefer using the Raspberry Pi as a substitute for an Ethernet shield for any project where I want to connect an Arduino to the network. For one thing it's cheaper, $35 plus another $10 for a USB WiFi dongle if I want to go wireless, and I find the network programming much easier for me.

The Gertboard is way overpriced as a bridge to an ATmega project, by the way, but is a good prototyping tool for the Raspberry Pi itself.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 20, 2013, 01:21 am
You know, I never considered that use for a Pi.. as a slave to an arduino, for connectivity and such.  It certainly can provide a lot more flexibility and "support" than a standard WiFi shield... Hmm.  (gears grinding..)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Mar 20, 2013, 01:47 am
I think of it more as a slave to the pi to make up for lackluster gpio

but whatever  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Mar 20, 2013, 01:49 am

You know, I never considered that use for a Pi.. as a slave to an arduino, for connectivity and such.  It certainly can provide a lot more flexibility and "support" than a standard WiFi shield... Hmm.  (gears grinding..)

I think they are a good pair, they complement each other's shortcomings.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on Mar 20, 2013, 03:17 am
I get my Pi today! AUS$40.

First project will be to get my Realtek SDR working, I've had NO luck under 'Doze, except across my network.

I was thinking of putting the 'Pi upstairs away from all the EMR, running an antenna cable outside.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Mar 20, 2013, 04:30 am

I get my Pi today! AUS$40.

First project will be to get my Realtek SDR working, I've had NO luck under 'Doze, except across my network.

I was thinking of putting the 'Pi upstairs away from all the EMR, running an antenna cable outside.




That seems to be a pretty popular application. Have fun!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Mar 20, 2013, 05:59 am

The Gertboard is way overpriced as a bridge to an ATmega project, by the way, but is a good prototyping tool for the Raspberry Pi itself.

I recall when I was still actively following the R-pi forums, thinking the gertboard seemed a bit expensive.  Adafruit and others are now churning out cheaper ways to connect R-Pi's to devices.  Here are all of the Adafruit R-Pi offerings: http://www.adafruit.com/category/105 (http://www.adafruit.com/category/105)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 20, 2013, 07:26 pm
I got a Pi by luck about a month after it came out and I feel like a jerk because I haven't even powered it up yet and I know there were many people waiting for one.   Learning Atmel's line of uCs and Altera's line of PLDs has kept me too busy so far to devote any time to it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Mar 20, 2013, 08:47 pm
I was getting nowhere using an Arduino with Ethernet for my "Internet of Things" projects and ordered a Pi simply because they were so cheap. After I played around with it for a few days I realized it was a computer, not a micro controller and was the perfect solution to combining sensors and web pages so that I could use my iPhone as the GUI without having to write any apps for the phone. I was pretty surprised at the performance of the Pi running what I generally consider desktop applications. I'm still impressed at what you get for $35.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MitkoDyakov on Mar 20, 2013, 10:55 pm

I was getting nowhere using an Arduino with Ethernet for my "Internet of Things" projects and ordered a Pi simply because they were so cheap. After I played around with it for a few days I realized it was a computer, not a micro controller and was the perfect solution to combining sensors and web pages so that I could use my iPhone as the GUI without having to write any apps for the phone. I was pretty surprised at the performance of the Pi running what I generally consider desktop applications. I'm still impressed at what you get for $35.


What class memory card do you have on it? If it is class 6 it will be very fast.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Mar 20, 2013, 11:09 pm


I was getting nowhere using an Arduino with Ethernet for my "Internet of Things" projects and ordered a Pi simply because they were so cheap. After I played around with it for a few days I realized it was a computer, not a micro controller and was the perfect solution to combining sensors and web pages so that I could use my iPhone as the GUI without having to write any apps for the phone. I was pretty surprised at the performance of the Pi running what I generally consider desktop applications. I'm still impressed at what you get for $35.


What class memory card do you have on it? If it is class 6 it will be very fast.


Yes, class 6. Best Buy had 8GB cards for $10. I bought several.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 22, 2013, 07:57 am
20 x MAX7219 multiplexing display-things.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399w.jpg)

$9.60 from eBay including shipping.

I tested one at random (the missing one in the photo) and it worked fine. Note the nice packing.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 22, 2013, 11:56 am

20 x MAX7219 multiplexing display-things.
I tested one at random (the missing one in the photo) and it worked fine. Note the nice packing.


SWEET!  Wow, the shipping to Oz from Shenzen is fast, huh?  I am expecting that my order will still be another few days to arrive.  Yeah, they do tend to be no-frills packing, but these guys I use for price and not for fluff and pretty stuff.  

I really have no idea how they maintain the prices that they do, between them and another similar vendor, I just can't find a fault except for shipping times from overseas.  Beyond that, I swear the prices on half of it won't even cover the shipping cost, never mind the items themselves.  I don't even see how this could be profitable if they were knockoff chips-- you still have to make a knockoff chip that works, or you aren't going to sell many.  All I can think is that they buy whole warehouses of surplus and blow it out.  One tip off that this may be the case is that some times they will have the same device with multiple prices.. In other words, they think in terms of bins, not products.  Two identical products from two different wholesale purchases with a standardized markup.. Employees only know them as bins number 013345 and 547758, or something.

Their employees don't know anything about the products from what I can tell, I had a fruitless and frustrating time trying to let them know that they had made a mistake in their listings (http://www.ebay.com/itm/10PCS-LM2596-DC-DC-Step-Down-CC-CV-Adjustable-Module-Output-DC-1-5V-35V-/400417999181?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5d3ac5c94d) calling these Voltage regulator modules "CC-CV" when they are not constant current devices.  They were polite enough, but between the language barrier and not understanding the product, it was pointless.  If anyone can send them a note in Chinese explaining, maybe they will fix the listing, until then, just have to know better.  Caveat Emptor, as always- even when the vendor isn't trying to stiff you, unless you are a smart consumer, you still might not get what you think...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 22, 2013, 05:37 pm
FTDI breakout module:

http://dx.com/p/ftdi-basic-breakout-arduino-usb-to-ttl-upload-tool-for-mwc-black-142041

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 23, 2013, 12:04 am

SWEET!  Wow, the shipping to Oz from Shenzen is fast, huh?


Yep, I ordered on 13 March, it arrived on 22 March.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 23, 2013, 12:29 am


SWEET!  Wow, the shipping to Oz from Shenzen is fast, huh?


Yep, I ordered on 13 March, it arrived on 22 March.


Not bad, but I'm a whole lot further way and my Asian E-bay purchases usually get here in 10 or 11 days like clock work, so not much difference.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 23, 2013, 04:37 am



SWEET!  Wow, the shipping to Oz from Shenzen is fast, huh?


Yep, I ordered on 13 March, it arrived on 22 March.


Not bad, but I'm a whole lot further way and my Asian E-bay purchases usually get here in 10 or 11 days like clock work, so not much difference.

Lefty


Just a few more days to here except for the bubble-bags that won free trips to Philadelphia. One got 1st prize and spent a week, the other got second prize -- two weeks!
Well, okay, I borrow from W.C. Fields but the timing is more or less what happened.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 23, 2013, 07:13 am

20 x MAX7219 multiplexing display-things.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399w.jpg)

$9.60 from eBay including shipping.

I tested one at random (the missing one in the photo) and it worked fine. Note the nice packing.


I have had great luck with 7219s from eBay despite being incredibly cheap.  Also, EPM240s.  $1.60 on eBay for qty 50 including shipping or $2.20 each for qty 10 including shipping.  $6.60 each at Digikey.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Mar 23, 2013, 02:33 pm
Digikey may be more expensive yet if I order before 3pm, even with inexpensive USPS shipping, I get the parts the next day. Time value of money and a that. Can't beat Asian prices for many components if you're willing to wait, however.

I do wonder how many of them are fakes and / or pulls from existing assemblies but I have yet to have a bad experience with parts / assemblies from Chinese or other resellers. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 23, 2013, 06:45 pm

Digikey may be more expensive yet if I order before 3pm, even with inexpensive USPS shipping, I get the parts the next day. Time value of money and a that. Can't beat Asian prices for many components if you're willing to wait, however.

I do wonder how many of them are fakes and / or pulls from existing assemblies but I have yet to have a bad experience with parts / assemblies from Chinese or other resellers.  


Totally agree.   I just received 5 XMEGAs I want to play with from Digikey today.  No real price advange on these on eBay and I would be waiting 3 weeks instead of 2 days, plus the eBay sellers are selling the A, not the A1 of this chip and I don't know a lot about XMEGAs except the first revs had some bugs so these older codes might not be the best thing to work with.  Minnesota to Chicagoland almost always takes 48 hours which is fine with me.  They generally only charge me about $3 for shipping when I buy a few chips.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 23, 2013, 09:50 pm
I did, I hit it out of the park with that synchro meter.  Arrived today, sealed factory packaging.

Emailed the company, as these have to be ordered directly from the company, usually.  First email was simply asking for a price quote for the device, here is the reply:

"The 801-F30 is our standard Synchro/Resolver panel meter with 0.01 degrees of resolution and 0.03 degrees of accuracy. In qty 1-4 pcs the per unit sell price is $2,550 with a 4 week leadtime."

I have now sent back an email explaining that I have one in hand, the project that I am doing, and the fact that I am trying to flip it for the most money I can so I can further finance the safety valve project.  I figure it can't hurt, I have nothing to lose. Worst case the guy tell me to get bent and I sell it on ebay.  I'd be happy to get a reasonable offer to purchase it (so they could recertify and sell), or I figure given the "good cause" nature of my project, he might be able to direct me to the maximum I might get for it.  They sell on ebay USED for $800-$1200.

8)   :smiley-mr-green:  :smiley-mr-green:  :smiley-mr-green:  8)

The fates want this valve built too, it seems!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Mar 24, 2013, 01:26 am
Quote
Worst case the guy tell me to get bent and I sell it on ebay.


Haha, no the worst case is the guy will tell you it's stolen and you should send it to them.

Back in the old days we used synchronous resolvers to generate sine theta and cosine theta and their multiples to compute various analog functions. Too bad it didn't come with a couple of resolvers. Still, a pretty neat toy.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 24, 2013, 01:29 am

Quote
Worst case the guy tell me to get bent and I sell it on ebay.


Haha, no the worst case is the guy will tell you it's stolen and you should send it to them.

Back in the old days we used synchronous resolvers to generate sine theta and cosine theta and their multiples to compute various analog functions. Too bad it didn't come with a couple of resolvers. Still, a pretty neat toy.


LOL, if the guy asks you for it's serial number better hang up.  :D

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 25, 2013, 09:50 am
This 8-digit display based on the MAX7219 chip on eBay for $10:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399aa.jpg)

It makes a nice neat package, and is designed that you can put them together horizontally or vertically.




The chip is on the back, out of the way:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ab.jpg)




I managed to solder on the SMD capacitors and resistor:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ac.jpg)

You know what? I'm worried if I sneeze I'll never see them again. ;)

Plus, they are the devil to solder. You have to clamp them down or they just wander off.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 25, 2013, 09:56 am
You know what? I'm worried if I sneeze I'll never see them again. ;)


Or worse.  Take a deep breath and ... gulp!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 25, 2013, 10:20 am
I almost threw them in the bin, thinking they were a bit of stray plastic from the packaging:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ad.jpg)

Then I took a closer look (not easy at my age):

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ae.jpg)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 25, 2013, 05:28 pm

I managed to solder on the SMD capacitors and resistor:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ac.jpg)

You know what? I'm worried if I sneeze I'll never see them again. ;)

Plus, they are the devil to solder. You have to clamp them down or they just wander off.


Those look like 0805s.  I just got used to soldering them on, they are not that hard.  I have a method to pre-solder the pads, top with flux, and then use a hot air gun and tweezers to apply these parts as the first step in assembly before larger parts and this works good for me - surface tension pulls them in and makes a nice heel.  I look like a soldering expert under the microscope.  I bought a kit that requires 0402 parts and I just got a cap and a resistor 0402 set so I now have 0805, 0603, and 0402 kits for caps and resistors in common values.  I guess I am set.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/200898460364
http://www.ebay.com/itm/190805736512

I like surface mount parts that have the values coded on.  "103" and "472" is a lot easier to read than a bunch of color bars.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Mar 28, 2013, 08:34 pm
Whew!  I know sometimes it takes longer to get here than other places- but that's ridiculous..

I just got the MAX7219 order... LOL.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 29, 2013, 12:39 am
8 5V Isolation Relay Module Optocoupler Driver Module 10A/250VAC, 10A/30VDC w/diode freewheeling protection, short response time.

4 Arduino Ultrasonic Module HC-SR04 Distance Sensor

6 SD modules way cheaper than any I've seen on eBay.

2 BlueTooth modules configurable as master or slave. They do sell non-configurables for less.

2 6-axis gyro + accelerometer modules.

8 IR remote receiver modules. At the price quoted I got extras. If I didn't, I'd need them.

2 20x audio amps and 2 200x that I can't tell apart by looking at them.

With registered shipping from HK and Paypal fee, $68.40 total.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Mar 29, 2013, 08:17 am
intel i7 3770k
8 gb ddr3 2400 ram
ATI 7950 3gig video card

to upgrade my AMDfx 4170, 8 gig ddr 1866 ati 6870

now I have a phenom II 720x3 with 4 gig of DDR2 1066 and a geforce 9600GT to sell off

]:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 29, 2013, 11:18 am
Do you run flight sims by any chance?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Mar 29, 2013, 07:30 pm
no
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Mar 29, 2013, 08:31 pm
Sounds like a nice Skyrim setup.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 11, 2013, 05:21 am
Another oddball item arrived today, a 75 foot Siecor Gold fiber optic cable.  Two strands, tiny stuff.  I got it on one of those 99 cent bids.. mainly because I haven't played with optic fiber and seventy five feet of it for a buck was a no brainer.

So, what exactly can I misuse this for?   :smiley-mr-green:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Chagrin on Apr 11, 2013, 05:45 am
So, what exactly can I misuse this for?   :smiley-mr-green:


Dog leash for the digital age? Strangle your wife with them and take her life insurance money? I have no idea; the fibers are so small that they aren't capable of much light output. I fiddled with some but never had much luck in the blinky light department.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: focalist on Apr 15, 2013, 08:14 pm
Well the fiber cable may be a nice strong silicone rope :)

However, I did finally land a good multimeter:

Amprobe AM-1250 True RMS  Multi-Meter (used, tested good)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Amprobe-AM-1250-Multi-Meter-True-RMS-No-Reserve-/00/s/MTAyNFg3Njg=/z/cqgAAOxyuOtRZdcU/$T2eC16V,!)!E9s2fB+2)BRZdcU(Pog~~60_57.JPG)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 20, 2013, 06:45 pm
Part of my latest DealExtreme order:
1 PIR module, including lens and electronics --- $3.50
1 28-pin ZIF socket --- $2.80

Yes, a ZIFduino is in the future works.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on May 12, 2013, 10:26 am

mouser.com is selling TLC5916IN (http://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Texas-Instruments/TLC5916IN/?qs=sGAEpiMZZMsE420DPIasPpR0nm8USuLtmpNyFAt1L4Y%3d) LED drivers for 94 cents each (in quantities >= 10).  I just picked up two fists-full. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on May 17, 2013, 06:33 pm
Bought a couple of freetronics mega protoshields and stack header sets . A delight to put to use.
Returned the Duratech soldering station that stopped working after 1 day  :smiley-eek-blue: and replaced it with the Dick Smith one. Still seems to be working after day #2.
0.7mm solder melts a little quicker, a big help.

Nearly finished this project so bought the Experimenter's kit to have some fun...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: E40racer on May 17, 2013, 11:39 pm
Picked up a Beaglebone black this evening :)

(http://www.bajdi.com/images/beaglebone-black.jpg)

Also received a big bag of various components from Tayda Electronics, arrived 10 days after I made the order.

(http://www.bajdi.com/images/tayda-electronics.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 23, 2013, 01:11 am
Long ago I had local geek friends and sometimes we would chip in as a group and buy a bunch of something that was cheaper in quantity. I know that's not a bright idea over the net but I also know that if enough people want a thing at a better price then one person has a chance to get rid of excess after buying a bundle.

I've done this locally in my poor neighborhood with MP3 players and it worked fine but those were all people I knew who did buy from me at cost when the players came in. I didn't get stuck and everyone got factory refurb Sansa players for $12 ea just in time for Christmas giving. Same player new at WalMart was over $30. Part of my aim then was to raise awareness about prices and group action, poor don't have to be so poor, but that did not get through so well as the only pro-active one was me even after making the point.

So I am here now and there's an item that when 100 are bought costs 5 Euros each but when less than 100 are bought costs 20 Euros each. It's an audio module that I believe could work well and easily (I struggle with some others< STILL) with or without an MCU. I plan to get one to test and if it's what I think, figure out how to buy 100. I know someone who will want 20 and I will want 5 to 10 but the rest, I need to see if there will be takers after the units arrive, knowing that shipping won't be free.

http://www.vlsi.fi/en/products/vs1000module.html

Quote
VS1000 Module provides a quick and low-cost way to add high-quality analog stereo output to a system. It has industrial qualification and long term availability that makes it attractive for many applications.


Quote
Plays audio from micro-SD card or internal SPI Flash (or both)
    Can be customized, both firmware and content
    Can copy audio content and update firmware from micro-SD card to internal Flash
    Triggered via USB, UART or IO pins
    Line-out or headphone stereo analog outputs with SNR>90dB (A-weighted)
    High-performance license-free Ogg Vorbis decoder
    Supports variable bit-rates and many sample rates
    Plays from internal Flash up to 20 mins, play time can be extended to several days by using micro-SD card
    Firmware customization tool VSIDE is available for free
    Single power supply 3.4...5.5V, Note: IOVDD is generated from internal regulators, IO pins are not 5V tolerant!
    Low-power operation
    Industrial temperature range


Note that the IO pins are 3.4V only, need voltage leveling to use. But it has USB and UART IO which I'm pretty sure that USB is always 5V and I think (please help here!) that UART is the same 5V as our serial and software serial.

Anyhow this is just to see how the idea is received.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: codlink on May 23, 2013, 01:18 am
Would be willing to go in on a minimum of 5, maybe 10.  Would be willing to help with the hardware as I am not confident on the software.  PM me and we can exchange emails.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on May 23, 2013, 02:31 am
Note that the IO pins are 3.4V only, need voltage leveling to use. But it has USB and UART IO which I'm pretty sure that USB is always 5V and I think (please help here!) that UART is the same 5V as our serial and software serial.


No.  From the datasheet...

Quote
Voltage at Any Digital Input Min: -0.3 Max: IOVDD+0.3 1 V
1 Must not exceed 3.6 V


It looks to me like the chip / board takes a 3.9 V to 5.5 V supply which is regulated to 3.6 V.  I think it would interface well with a 3.3 V board.


@GoForSmoke, what is the minimum number you want to deal with?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 23, 2013, 03:26 am
I would have to find a way to get 100 at 5 Euros each plus any shipping.
That's already stretching it. I won't be asking for money up front.

If someone else with deeper pockets that wants a majority of the pieces wants to do the buy then I would hope to buy from them.

Looking on the web just now I see 5 Euros is US$6.42. I think that it packs a lot for that price.

Arduino will run 8 MHz on 3.6V won't it? I'd also be looking at if these things can simply be hooked up to button circuits as stand-alone.

I think that a guy like you would also be interested in a book like this:
http://www.vsdsp-forum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=36
Quote
The book compiles together a lot of information, which otherwise would be difficult to piece together from different sources, such as datasheets, application notes and C header files. For example, it tells how to use all of the 22 input and/or output pins of the VS1053. The book explains the structure of the VS1053 audio path and teaches how to write VSDSP interrupt handlers in both assembly and C language. All of the examples use VSIDE, with step by step guide on how to obtain, install and use the graphical development environment.


In my current ongoing state it would put me to sleep but maybe some day again I could use the like of it.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Chagrin on May 23, 2013, 07:58 am
Here's a VS1003 module (http://dx.com/p/vs1003-on-board-microphone-mp3-module-blue-152376) for 10 euros.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 23, 2013, 12:44 pm
Yes, I have already only I spent closer to 5 buying factory-direct. You know code and wiring that works for those by any chance? I don't. My docs are the chip datasheets and app notes that don't tell the module board so I have the same trouble that many do.

But that's not all. That unit has no SD or internal flash at all though yes, a better chip.

10 Euros for that as opposed to swinging a deal to get complete packages for 5 Euros.....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: E40racer on May 23, 2013, 06:24 pm
I also have 2 of those VS1003 modules. I've found several Arduino libraries and code for that module but I can not get it to play an mp3 from an SD card. I can get it to work in midi mode though with the library from Maniacbug. (Maybe we should start a new topic about the module.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 23, 2013, 11:16 pm

I also have 2 of those VS1003 modules. I've found several Arduino libraries and code for that module but I can not get it to play an mp3 from an SD card. I can get it to work in midi mode though with the library from Maniacbug. (Maybe we should start a new topic about the module.)


If you could then please, I don't get a peep out of the things. Maybe I burned them up for all I know.

I'll keep an eye out in the audio forum but if you could PM when/where you start then I would appreciate that.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on May 24, 2013, 10:13 am
I would have to find a way to get 100 at 5 Euros each plus any shipping.


What is the minimum number you want to deal with per person?  Hypothetically, would you be willing to repackage and ship me one?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on May 24, 2013, 10:16 am
Arduino will run 8 MHz on 3.6V won't it?


The processor seems to run fine at 16 MHz / 3.3V (though I wouldn't use it under those conditions to control anything that could cause damage).

Quote
I think that a guy like you would also be interested in a book like this:
http://www.vsdsp-forum.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?f=11&t=36


Thanks.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 24, 2013, 05:58 pm

I would have to find a way to get 100 at 5 Euros each plus any shipping.


What is the minimum number you want to deal with per person?  Hypothetically, would you be willing to repackage and ship me one?



Why not? I expect to wind up with some singles, I just can't hang onto to many for long.

At this point I am just testing waters.


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on May 24, 2013, 07:06 pm

At this point I am just testing waters.

I looked at the module and I'm a bit puzzled. If I understand it correctly this module can play 20 minutes of audio from internal flash  :smiley-yell:
That would be more than enough for most of my projects to give back audio feedback.
But this module has so many pins  :smiley-eek:? How many control pins from the Arduino would I need if I wanted to play <=255 files at arduino command?
What would I need to get the files in the flash?
If it would be less than 5 pins: I'm in for at least 20 of those at 5 euro each plus transport.  :smiley-mr-green:

Best regards
Jantje

ps As the pins are not 5 volt tolerant some cheap bulk logic translators would make it a service deal  XD
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 25, 2013, 12:34 am


At this point I am just testing waters.

I looked at the module and I'm a bit puzzled. If I understand it correctly this module can play 20 minutes of audio from internal flash  :smiley-yell:
That would be more than enough for most of my projects to give back audio feedback.
But this module has so many pins  :smiley-eek:? How many control pins from the Arduino would I need if I wanted to play <=255 files at arduino command?
What would I need to get the files in the flash?
If it would be less than 5 pins: I'm in for at least 20 of those at 5 euro each plus transport.  :smiley-mr-green:

Best regards
Jantje

ps As the pins are not 5 volt tolerant some cheap bulk logic translators would make it a service deal  XD


You know more EE than I am ever likely to, but here goes:

From descriptions at VLSI Solutions (Finland, I find that delicious) these DSP chips incorporate microcontroller capability in themselves. That would explain need for pins?
MCU's? They don't need no stinking MCU's! (with no apologies to Mel Brooks)

There is also the multiple interfaces.

IIUC the site, you can copy SD card to internal flash and back.

For better answers, here is the site forum:
http://www.vsdsp-forum.com/phpbb/

Level shifters --- I bet there's more than I have noticed, the 74HCT4050 looks to be "bomb"(extra good):
http://dx.com/p/jy-mcu-5v-3v-iic-uart-level-2-way-converter-module-adapter-178301
http://dx.com/p/jy-mcu-5v-3v-iic-uart-spi-level-4-way-converter-module-adapter-178286
http://www.futurlec.com/74HCT/74HCT4050pr.shtml
http://www.futurlec.com/4000Series/CD40109.shtml

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on May 25, 2013, 12:50 am
I found a dutch article where someone used it for a train. These modules are super cool.
You need an additional amplifier. The files can be selected in several ways (depends on the firmware) With a sd card that can hold files and a new firmware that looks pretty useful.
The Dutch guy stated the power of the amplifier caused issues he said the module is "sensitive"
Out of the box the firmware stops the playing sound when a new sound is requested. He changed the firmware so he could mix up to 4 sounds.
Yes I want some. you can count me in
Jantje
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: N_Tesla on May 28, 2013, 08:04 pm
I just bought a lot of seven IV-16 numitron tubes on ebay. Looks like they were the very last available...

(http://tubehobby.com/images/iv16/1.jpg)
(Image from Tubehobby.)

They will serve as displays in my future streamline-styled (or so) weather station.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: adrianf on May 29, 2013, 03:59 am
Assortment of resistors (5000) pack. 200 transistors (BC548/549 etc). A new arduino Mega, LCD keypad a DDS-60, 10 prototype shields a breadboard a 35 amp power supply (for ham radio not Arduino)
Except the power supply and DDS-60 all bought from China for less than $80

Adrian
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: robtillaart on Jun 04, 2013, 06:40 pm
purchased an NXP LPC1768 controller, it has the IDE in the cloud - see also www.mbed.org -

No particular project in mind, maybe port some of the Arduino libraries I posted on the playground when it is raining ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jun 04, 2013, 11:08 pm

purchased an NXP LPC1768 controller, it has the IDE in the cloud - see also www.mbed.org -

No particular project in mind, maybe port some of the Arduino libraries I posted on the playground when it is raining ;)


NXP doesn't sample.  Why not stick with the good guys (Atmel).  Samples, and very nice desktop development software.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Jun 05, 2013, 02:59 am
I've gotten more samples/freebies out of NXP than I've gotten out of Atmel...
(usually as a result of special promotions or tradeshow seminars, but Atmel never struck me as one of the friendlier sites WRT sampling, either.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: robtillaart on Jun 05, 2013, 09:10 pm
Quote
NXP doesn't sample. Why not stick with the good guys (Atmel).   

"Do not determine who are the good guys based on their free gifts", that's a lesson I teach to my daughters too ;)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Jun 05, 2013, 09:20 pm

Quote
NXP doesn't sample. Why not stick with the good guys (Atmel).   

"Do not determine who are the good guys based on their free gifts", that's a lesson I teach to my daughters too ;)

Reminds me of this story http://www.arunjain.com/jokes/Shit_-_A_Bird_Story.htm (http://www.arunjain.com/jokes/Shit_-_A_Bird_Story.htm)
copied for conveniance
Quote


A little bird was flying south for the winter.  It was so cold; the bird froze up and fell to the ground in a large field. While it was lying there, a cow came by and dropped some dung on it.  As the frozen bird lay there in the pile of cow dung, it began to realize how warm it was.  The dung was actually thawing him out!  He lay there all warm and happy, and soon began to sing for joy.



A passing cat heard the bird singing and came to investigate. Following the sound, the cat discovered the bird under the pile of cow dung, and promptly dug him out and ate him!



The morals of this story are:



    Not everyone who drops shit on you is your enemy.
    Not everyone who gets you out of shit is your friend.
    And when you're in deep shit, keep your mouth shut!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: robtillaart on Jun 05, 2013, 09:28 pm
LOL
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jun 05, 2013, 11:27 pm

I've gotten more samples/freebies out of NXP than I've gotten out of Atmel...
(usually as a result of special promotions or tradeshow seminars, but Atmel never struck me as one of the friendlier sites WRT sampling, either.)



Just so happens, I asked for 6 ICs yesterday and they went out 2-day UPS about 2 hours after I requested them.  I think they are perfectly friendly.  Can't see how to get a sample out of NXP at all.  You search that on their site, it takes you to a page that says if you are not already a direct customer of theirs with a purchase agreement, no samples for you.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: adrianf on Jun 06, 2013, 12:00 pm
Used to get freebies from Texas Instruments but they stopped giving stuff away

Adrian
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jun 06, 2013, 04:39 pm
I have these on order with some other stuff on free shipping:

http://dx.com/p/super-strong-rare-earth-re-magnets-12mm-x-1mm-100-pack-13517

Super Strong Rare-Earth RE Magnets (12mm x 1mm / 100-Pack)

Comes out to 16 and a half cents each.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jun 06, 2013, 08:28 pm

Used to get freebies from Texas Instruments but they stopped giving stuff away

Adrian



You guys are having a lot more trouble than I am.  I am not sure when this "stopped giving stuff away" happened.  I just ordered from TI too.  TI samples.  You can find parts on their site that DigiKey sells for $100 in qty 1 that they will sample.  I am trying out some motor drivers.  I did a L298 by itself (bad idea, it does not limit current - good thing my power supply does!  :smiley-sweat:) and just did a L297/L298 and wanted to try out some more modern solutions.  I got 3 each of DRV8432 and DRV8412 from TI and 5 each of AMIS30421C4211RG and AMIS30512C5122RG from ON.  All it took was asking.  On does add a $11 processing charge so it's best to fill the order, you can go as much as 7 items of 5 each without complaint.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Jun 07, 2013, 05:39 am
Knobs, 15 different types of knobs for rotary encoders, aluminum knobs some smooth, anodized, some polished, some knurled. Different sizes :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Papa G on Jun 07, 2013, 04:42 pm
150W PV panel, Morningstar MPPT charge controller, Exeltech inverter, 100Ah deep discharge AGM battery, Anderson Powerpoles + crimper, 10AWG zip cord.

Outfitting the RV to do a little boon docking in the Big Bend area in July.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Peter_I on Jun 08, 2013, 09:29 pm
10 IR receivers.

A lot of gizmoes are going to be controlled by the TV-remote and a really ugly remote from a BRIO toy train.

I simply have to make something outrageous that is controlled by the BRIO remote.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 13, 2013, 11:32 pm
Never underestimate what can pop up at a thrift store. Went to a local thrift store today on a monthly visit (wife buys books there) and I always check out the electrical section before going back to the car and read a book while the wife makes her selections. Lo and beyond I found a genuine arduino Duemilanove 328 board along with some kind of starter kit that includes a bare prototyping shield board, assorted leds, resistors, a couple of buttons, two pots, A 9vdc battery box with power switch and connector plug, and a mini solderless breadboard with a ton of male to male jumpers. All bundled in a plastic baggy for the grand total of $1.99. Not a bad score if I do say so myself.

Just got done quickly checking out the arduino board and it uploads the blink sketch just fine!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Jun 14, 2013, 12:39 am
Used to get freebies from Texas Instruments but they stopped giving stuff away


Recently they sent me a TLC5940NT and a TLC5940PWP three days after I ordered them; no cost.  While ordering the website offered six other chips that might interest me (I declined).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Jun 14, 2013, 12:44 am
http://www.vlsi.fi/en/products/vs1000module.html

At this point I am just testing waters.


Ugh.  I would love to go in with you for 5 to 10 of those things but I just can't do it right now.  I do hope you round up enough people to pull it off.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jun 14, 2013, 05:43 am

Used to get freebies from Texas Instruments but they stopped giving stuff away


Recently they sent me a TLC5940NT and a TLC5940PWP three days after I ordered them; no cost.  While ordering the website offered six other chips that might interest me (I declined).


One time it 'offered' me a rather high-end ADC that could not actually be sampled, by me at least.  Maybe there are other levels of accounts, though they have sent me some very high end parts that I expect to be able to implement maybe in a few years...  XD
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Jun 14, 2013, 05:54 am
One time it 'offered' me a rather high-end ADC that could not actually be sampled, by me at least.


Seems familiar.  24 bit high speed ADC.  I think it had an SPI interface.  I very likely passed because it was itty-bitty.  The surface mount chips seem to be easier to sample.

Quote
Maybe there are other levels of accounts...


Mine is definitely at the bottom of the pit so I consider TI to be very generous.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jun 18, 2013, 01:14 am
My order (through a friend, PayPal doesn't like my address) from Yourduino arrived, I finally got one through.

Shipping seems high in ratio to the total but that's because they charge so low for parts! Also the box (not bubble wrap bag) is well packed, padded and sealed.

2 wall warts, 1 5V and 1 12V
40 RGB leds -- at 5/$1 I don't need a specific use. Status led can be 1 of 8 colors easily.
200 220R -- will need 3 per led, they ran 1 cent each.
40 74HC595 Serial in parallel out shift registers -- yes I got more than just for the leds.
30 ULN2003 7-bit Darlington arrays (thought they were 2803's but these will do for the price)
40 PC817 Single channel opto-isolators -- car 12V to Arduino pin or vv safe and 1 step easy.

All shipped here for 40-some bucks. And yeah, the eBay Bottom Feeders will probably call me a spendthrift sucker or worse.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: terryking228 on Jun 18, 2013, 03:13 pm
Quote
My order (through a friend, PayPal doesn't like my address) from Yourduino arrived,


Sorry, we try to make it clear: you don't need a Paypal account at YourDuino, you can pay with any credit or debit card. Paypal handles the credit cards so we never see any customer card information.

Paypal has great security reputation: we have had 4000+ orders and zero Credit Card fraud.

And we will ship to the address you put on your order, not necessarily a Paypal confirmed address. 

Any problems with this stuff please email me: terry@yourduino.com
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jun 19, 2013, 08:38 am
I'll try it myself next time, in about 2 weeks.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: codlink on Jun 26, 2013, 12:43 am
Got a new Makerbot Replicator off Ebay for around 2/3 the price from the official website. 

Replicator Article - https://www.inventables.com/technologies/makerbot-replicator-3d-printer

I have printing non-stop for about a month now.  Just had to purchase my first set of filament.  This thing is amazing, especially if you're designing something that needs prototyping and don't like waiting.


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jun 26, 2013, 03:41 am
My latest dealextreme order arrived.

100 super magnets, 12mm dia x 1mm thick. I shall not want for small magnets any time soon. I like magnets.

10 x 1m heat shrink tubes of various diameters. I misplaced the ones I had, I actually need these.

2 x 5V regulated power modules with on/off button. For try-out, they were cheap. There is a DC barrel connector jack, on/off button, regulator, caps, diode, resistors and 8 pin header with one side as GND, the other as VCC.

3 x 20 Schottky diodes --  20 each -- IN4004 / 1N4148 / BAT85. Hey I wanted Schottky's and now I got em. Signal strength only which is fine. Now I can make piezo buttons that are even more sensitive? Or be able to cut .3V in a circuit. Or maybe do something more useful?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jun 26, 2013, 04:56 am
My last purchase was 1 ohm resistors (1%), .1 ohm resistors (1%) and .005 ohm shunts (1%).  Gonna build me an ammeter!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Ufoguy on Jun 28, 2013, 07:56 am
I bought a hc sr04 just a few days ago.
Don't know what to do with it though.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 01, 2013, 04:03 am
I bought a bunch of things from dx.com, ebay and futurlec.com. Have a few project ideas and lashed out for components for all of them. In the next 2-3 weeks I am going to be inundated with a treasure trove of components, sensors, microcontrollers and what not.

Regrettably, my sparkfun.com order didn't go through. :-/ No error message on the order screen, just a red span (sans error message) indicating something wasn't right, as well as a debit+credit for the order amount from my account. Have emailed support to see if we can work out what's up.

The most interesting (for me) things I have bought include:

- rf transceivers ($5.60 a pair from dx.com!?)
- high powered rf transceivers
- wireless rf remote control + receiver
- (water) flow, CO2, PIR, relative humidity & temp, ultrasonic, 6DOF accelerometer + gyro and GPS sensors
- bluetooth transceivers
- slipring
- Atmel 328, 84 & 85 microcontrollers + IC sockets
- strip and proto-board
- SD & micro SD modules

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 01, 2013, 04:05 am

Got a new Makerbot Replicator off Ebay for around 2/3 the price from the official website. 

Replicator Article - https://www.inventables.com/technologies/makerbot-replicator-3d-printer

I have printing non-stop for about a month now.  Just had to purchase my first set of filament.  This thing is amazing, especially if you're designing something that needs prototyping and don't like waiting.


Nice! Would like to see some pics of what you've printed?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: codlink on Jul 07, 2013, 09:20 pm

Nice! Would like to see some pics of what you've printed?


Haven't printed anything worth a Nobel prize..  I am in the process of teaching myself 3D design and tried a number of CAD programs.  I think I found one that suits me, Solidworks.

Here is a clevis that costs around $12 and made it for pennies
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=48075;image)

Other things include a hood for my camera and some upgrade parts for the 3D printer.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jul 07, 2013, 09:58 pm
just ordered one of these power supplies

http://www.circuitspecialists.com/i-181791.html
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jul 10, 2013, 07:16 am
A 0.001 ohm resistor.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399x.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jul 10, 2013, 07:18 am
what are you using that to measure current on?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jul 10, 2013, 07:27 am
I had used it to measure the draw from a 12V battery as part of a UPS system. Never got it quite working perfectly.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wizdum on Jul 10, 2013, 07:49 am
(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-WejwEf8GI8Q/Udz1Qx32jTI/AAAAAAAAEBw/fZeHw3HPZ6s/w401-h534-no/IMG_20130709_205106.jpg)

Finally got everything dusted off and started testing. No idea what i'm going to do with it yet. Will probably make an arduino environmental monitor for it. The little 8+1 port switch is just for testing purposes, I need to rewire all the jacks into that room before I move my 24 port gigabit switch in there. The orange on the top is about 300 feet of fiber optic cable, with six media converters.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jul 10, 2013, 09:00 am

A 0.001 ohm resistor.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399x.jpg)



How do you even test that?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wizdum on Jul 10, 2013, 04:07 pm

A 0.001 ohm resistor.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399x.jpg)


1/4w or 1/2w?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jul 10, 2013, 04:39 pm


A 0.001 ohm resistor.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399x.jpg)


1/4w or 1/2w?

It's rating would be 10 watts. 100 amps X .1 volts drop.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wizdum on Jul 10, 2013, 09:38 pm



A 0.001 ohm resistor.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399x.jpg)


1/4w or 1/2w?

It's rating would be 10 watts. 100 amps X .1 volts drop.

Lefty


And another joke ruined by proper labeling, darn.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jul 11, 2013, 12:24 am

How do you even test that?


Not that easily. :)

Various measurements have given somewhat different results. I think the lugs have probably got a bit of resistance in them.

I tried passing 5 amps through it, but measure about 75 mV between the terminals, which doesn't sound right.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 11, 2013, 05:01 am
Maybe the time to fill a big R-C circuit both without and with that resistor would show something? But that would depend on how steady the power going in would be.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jul 11, 2013, 06:31 am
I tried again with a firmer connection to the resistor and doing a Kelvin measurement. Still got 8.8 mV with 4A going through it, so out by a factor of 2 as far as I can see.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 11, 2013, 11:10 am
A quick appraisal of my online electronics purchasing experience to date:

sparkfun.com: good product descriptions, reliable stock levels, quick feedback due to credit card processing being broken, but then fixed a day or so later. Good notification and delivered in a week. Sparkfun's packing department are incredible.
futurlec.com: order still not shipped after 2 weeks. replied to email enquiry within a day to say 7 items from my order are out of stock and will not be in stock for 1-2 weeks, when my order will be dispatched. website currently lists all 7 items as in stock.
dx.com: charged my credit card twice for the order. has apparently dispatched 3 shipments making up the complete order, but so far nothing has arrived (10 days since first shipment notification).

2 x ebay sellers (1 China, 1 Aussie) have shipped products asap and received them within a week.
Another ebay seller has shipped but via cheap shipping (US), so still waiting for the order to arrive (10 days and counting).

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 11, 2013, 12:05 pm
I remember a place in Australia called Dontronics that had a scheme called Simstick. I liked the idea of putting chips on like-memory cards in a small bus.
I did get a dev board for AVR 90Sxxxx chips from them but RL stepped in and next thing I knew Arduino was available.

Does anyone Down Under know Dontronics? I do wonder how many places like that there are in Australia and how good a country it is to run a small to medium business out of?

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 11, 2013, 12:54 pm
Never heard of them, so checked them out. Interesting site. Can't really tell what they're selling though. Layout is not the easiest to follow after sparkfun spoiling me with pics and descriptions.

Electronics SME in Australia not that great, imo. Market is tiny, international postage costs are steep, shipping components in can be expensive. If I had a good idea that would sell, I'd probably go to the US to do it first.

Love the place though, wouldn't trade it for anywhere else.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 13, 2013, 06:02 am
Got another order in with Yourduino.
Note that the chips and thermistors are package of 5 for from 75 cents to $1.50.


Order Summary:
Product    
Qty    Price    Subtotal
========================================
2.4GHz Transceiver Low Power nRF24L01+
2    $2.75    $5.50

AC Line Power Supply: 9V 1A
2    $3.00    $6.00

AC Line Power Supply: 3.3VDC 2.5A
1    $4.50    $4.50

5.5mm x 2.1mm Plug for Arduino External Power Connector
4    $0.35    $1.40

LM324 4x opamp (single supply) (Pkg of 5)
2    $0.75    $1.50

LM386 Audio amp low-voltage (Pkg of 5)
2    $0.75    $1.50

NE5532 Low Noise Dual Op Amp (Pkg of 5)
1    $1.50    $1.50

74HC165 8x Parallel-In Serial-Out Shift Register (Pkg of 5)
1    $1.50    $1.50

Thermistor 10K (5ea)
1    $1.25    $1.25

AC Line Power Supply: 5V 1A
1    $2.50    $2.50

Subtotal:    $27.15
Shipping:    $15.00
Tax:    $0.00
Total:    $42.15
========================================================
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 13, 2013, 08:47 am

Got another order in with Yourduino.


What's their stock level / shipping time like?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 13, 2013, 02:39 pm
Last time it was about 2 weeks when I expected 3.
I paid $3 extra for Fedex and figure less than 2 weeks.
What I don't know is about parts in stock.
DX hung me up twice out of 5 orders on stock. Both times there were big holidays in China.

For me the wait is not a big deal. Getting my parts is and so far I've always gotten my parts. Next down the list is parts being what I thought and for 3 particular parts out of many I ordered too quick from DX where the lack of info can equal or exceed the clear info.

Last of all, I did buy cheap ($2) hand-crank cell phone chargers from DX that are jokes. They have a wondrously inefficient set of plastic gears to drive a tiny motor/generator that does a great job of lighting the power led with moderate effort but 5V requires major effort. I might try one if it was an emergency and I was stuck. Caveat Emptor! I could probably do better putting a crank on a stepper motor or something.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 13, 2013, 06:23 pm
3 old purchases just gave me 6 good size super magnets.  :D  They make the super field that the voice coil moves across strong and precise enough for the HD to work back when it did. That's one kick@$$ field, it's got an arc shaped magnet above and one below. Want to build a strong generator or motor? These are worth a few bucks each.

These are bad HD's from back in the 90's. It takes a bit of work and a set of small torx drivers but hmmmm-ha these are IMO worth it.

One thing; case labels and warranty stickers usually cover a couple of screws that if you find them and get them off then you won't need a pry bar or claw hammer to get the damn lid off!

The platters are nice too. They'd make nice Tesla Turbine disks.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Osgeld on Jul 14, 2013, 12:10 am
A medium sized cardboard box stuffed with new old stock archer / radio shack parts for 5 bucks at the thrift store!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Jul 16, 2013, 07:36 pm

The platters are nice too. They'd make nice Tesla Turbine disks.


Or frisbees. In high school we had a Vax 750/11 with a RL02 removable hard disk drive, among other, refrigerator-sized attachments. These RL02 discs crashed often, and we'd scavenge the insides of the carrier for the platters and play frisbee with them. At about 14" across and heavy, good palm protection was a must, as was good aim. Otherwise, you'd be at risk of a 'oddjob' re-enactment.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Jul 16, 2013, 11:42 pm
In terms of disk platters, Richard Stallman (the guy who created the Free Software Foundation, Emacs, and GCC) came to last year's Gnu Cauldren in Prague for the 25th anniversary of the creation of GCC), and after talking about serious issues in terms of keeping software free, he donned his robes as Saint IGNUcius, and his halo in a former life was a disk platter:
(http://www.the-meissners.org/2012-small-albums/2012-prague/thumb/2012-07-09-10-35-005-fsfcauldron.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wizdum on Jul 17, 2013, 12:00 am



The platters are nice too. They'd make nice Tesla Turbine disks.



Just make sure you don't get one of the ones that use coated glass/ceramic platters!
http://youtu.be/YIfb972epFU?t=30s
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Jul 17, 2013, 10:42 am
"Weird Stuff Warehouse" recently acquired a load 12inch laser-disks, and I bought one ($1 each!) just to add to my "collection of obsolete media."

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: eddiea6987 on Jul 19, 2013, 06:44 am
Atmel Capacitive Touch Sensors , these are the one channel , i also purchased a couple 7 Channel .

(http://i44.tinypic.com/2uswmyc.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 20, 2013, 09:18 pm


Got another order in with Yourduino.


What's their stock level / shipping time like?


Box got in after spending time playing tag with Fedex. From order to arrival worked out to 4 days on a 3 to 6 day shipping method.

Everything arrived in good shape in a sealed & bubble-padded package.

I'm set for a while except maybe I want more of those 5/$1 RGB leds and shift registers to drive them with, or maybe I want analog led drivers.....

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 22, 2013, 07:57 am
Thanks for the follow up, GoForSmoke.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 22, 2013, 08:15 am
Ordered a bunch more stuff from dx.com and sparkfun.com. futurlec.com might be less-dodgy looking than dx, but dx.com deliver quicker and have good prices, their kit works, and they refunded the second debit they put on my card within the week they estimated it would take to do so. Been three weeks since I placed my futurlec.com order and it still has not been sent. All the items they listed in their email as out of stock when I queried them were still listed as IN STOCK on the site. Meh.

DX have shipped a large order in 3 separate lots in the same time. Sparkfun will have shipped 2 orders separated by 3 weeks before the futurelec.com order arrives. It's been a good lesson for me if I ever manage to come up with a product people want to buy and I want to sell. New SFE order was for some headers and what not but more importantly, a Makerbeam kit. Gotta love free shipping - that's $140 cheaper than it was the week before.

Managed to interface most things from my last dx/SFE orders last week, which has been a good learning experience: GPS, bluetooth, USB port, RF remote control and RF transceivers, as well as some other bits and pieces like LED units. My new DX order was essentially some more of the above, as well as some headers and other bits and pieces.

Pointers are my Achilles heel in C, so I bought the kindle version of this last night:

(http://imageshack.us/a/img835/1134/vkrb.jpg)

I have been researching FPGA devices, and decided on VHDL as the language I want to learn. Very few of the FPGA books are available electronically, so was pleased to find the kindle version of this last night, after reading some good reviews on amazon:

(http://imageshack.us/a/img29/3305/uot8.jpg)

And to help me learn VHDL, I lashed out and got one of these off Ebay ($182 with free postage):

(http://imageshack.us/a/img571/5497/g8ed.jpg)

(http://imageshack.us/a/img826/9941/srft.jpg)

I'll turn to the FPGA book and board when my Arduino projects start bogging down or I need a break.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jul 22, 2013, 09:02 am

And to help me learn VHDL, I lashed out and got one of these off Ebay ($182 with free postage):

I'll turn to the FPGA book and board when my Arduino projects start bogging down or I need a break.


Last summer I got this board from Terasic, using an oldish student card:

http://www.terasic.com.tw/cgi-bin/page/archive.pl?Language=English&CategoryNo=139&No=502

Very good deal.  It's been fun to mess with and throw Verilog against to try stuff out.  The chip is HUGE.  I see your board is this one after a little bit of searching:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ALTERA-FPGA-NIOS-CYCLONE-IV-EP4CE15-USB-BLASTER-Power-Adapter-Many-Gift-E082-/261058354313

If you have a student card, the Terasic board is a great deal, 115K LEs as opposed to 15K LEs, but I suppose that doesn't matter until you need them.  Even 15K is a lot compared to CPLDs.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 22, 2013, 09:07 am


And to help me learn VHDL, I lashed out and got one of these off Ebay ($182 with free postage):

I'll turn to the FPGA book and board when my Arduino projects start bogging down or I need a break.

Last summer I got this board from Terasic, using an oldish student card:

http://www.terasic.com.tw/cgi-bin/page/archive.pl?Language=English&CategoryNo=139&No=502

Very good deal.  I guess it is similar to yours.  It's been fun to mess with and throw Verilog against to try stuff out.  The chip is HUGE.


I spent some time working out if I could get a uni friend to get one for me - given I have not been a uni student for a while, and in the end decided The cheaper board was less hassle. Those DE2-115s look unreal though. If I had a student card it would have been a no brainer.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 23, 2013, 03:03 pm
So um.

After installing Android Studio and mucking about for a day, I managed to develop something.

A headache.

A few days later, I discovered Basic 4 Android, had a look through some examples, had a quick play with the demo version and watched the Intro video. Then bought it.

This evening, I managed to develop my first ever Android app that connects to a HC06 module connected to an Arduino Mega, and pass information between the Android app running on my phone and Arduino app running on my Mega.

I'm prototyping the system using the serial monitor I wrote, so the workflow gets a bit intense switching between Delphi as I add new monitor functions to make prototyping easier, to Basic to update the Android app, to C/C++ to update the Arduino app. Getting the =, :=, == and the  ', " right takes patience and concentration.

But it works. And it's so straight forward with so many B4A example apps that putting things together is almost a doddle. The example app code is uglier than sin, but it's still a doddle...

Best $69 I have spent in a long while.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: robtillaart on Jul 23, 2013, 07:37 pm
Can you post some sample Android Basic Code to show how it looks like?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 23, 2013, 10:46 pm
Think Microsoft VB / VBA and you are there 100% for both code and UI.

Code: [Select]

Sub Activity_Create(FirstTime As Boolean)
Activity.LoadLayout("2")
If AStream.IsInitialized = False Then
AStream.InitializePrefix(Main.BTSerial.InputStream, True, Main.BTSerial.OutputStream, "AStream")
End If
txtLog.Width = 100%x
End Sub
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jul 24, 2013, 03:16 am



And to help me learn VHDL, I lashed out and got one of these off Ebay ($182 with free postage):

I'll turn to the FPGA book and board when my Arduino projects start bogging down or I need a break.

Last summer I got this board from Terasic, using an oldish student card:

http://www.terasic.com.tw/cgi-bin/page/archive.pl?Language=English&CategoryNo=139&No=502

Very good deal.  I guess it is similar to yours.  It's been fun to mess with and throw Verilog against to try stuff out.  The chip is HUGE.


I spent some time working out if I could get a uni friend to get one for me - given I have not been a uni student for a while, and in the end decided The cheaper board was less hassle. Those DE2-115s look unreal though. If I had a student card it would have been a no brainer.




My student card doesn't have an issue date on the front so I tried it and it worked fine, probably 6 years since I took my last class. :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Jul 24, 2013, 03:22 am
I don't know what a 15,000 LE processor allows me to develop - have you done much with yours?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jul 24, 2013, 04:01 am

I don't know what a 15,000 LE processor allows me to develop - have you done much with yours?


Well, no.  Mostly just the provided sample configurations.   I think they call them programs, but I can't bring myself to call it that, it's really a hardware configuration.  I did make a stupid little pushbutton calculator out of a much smaller CPLD (EPM7256 208 pin I got cheap on eBay - 5V operation but small by current standards) and ran it out of room before I could implement all the features I wanted it to have, and it was all simple integer stuff working on 12 BCD digits with the CPLD reading the keypad, storing it into a register, and decoding to 3 4x7 segment displays in a multiplexed scanned fashion - that part works.  Maybe I should go back and use a EPM1270 instead.  But as an obvious one, you need pretty large FPGAs to create soft processors with larger feature sets, especially if you are going to integrate some additional hardware onto it.  I haven't tried a soft processor yet because I haven't figured out where it would be preferable to have instead of a normal hard processor.  This is probably just a failure of imagination on my part.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 08, 2013, 11:50 pm
I bought one of these from Amazon/STAHL for $20 to replace my Radio Shack 30W pen.
Quote
Soldering Station Features Continuously Variable Power Between 5-40W, a 1.5mm Pointed Tip

http://www.amazon.com/Soldering-Station-Features-Continuously-Variable/dp/B0029N70WM/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1375992087&sr=8-1&keywords=soldering+station

I know you pros are shaking your heads at this toy. It doesn't work right out of the box.

First thing I had to do was fix it and that took a Y-shape security tip to get the handle open after rolling & sliding the grip off. Then lift the wires and push inside until the heating element made contact with what it should have been with a nice click. Did that back and forth a few times to be sure then hot glued the wires halfway down the handle to keep it there. They should stay, they're thick, stiff wires in heat shrink.
Put back together, it works now as far as melts solder even turned down though it does take a while to heat up.

I'll see how it goes and probably get my $20 worth.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Aug 09, 2013, 01:41 am
I have a very similar looking one (probably the same)
It did work out of the box. Indeed slow to heat but once working it works good enough for Arduino style soldering  ;)
Best regards
jantje
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: robtillaart on Aug 09, 2013, 08:34 am
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51nFUwk4liL._SY450_.jpg)

OBD was on my wishlist for a long time, just played with some existing android apps and showed to some friends. There was a high "me too" reaction ;)
Torque is a nice app - dials and gauges - with a heads up mode.


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Aug 09, 2013, 11:29 am
I bought an AED.  Two,actually, one to gift to another household with a lot of high risk traffic.
Sigh.  Talk about gifts that you HOPE will NOT Be used.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Aug 09, 2013, 12:41 pm
Servos, push rods, universal joint, MPU-6050, pro mini clone.

Going to build a model-sized motion simulator.

I cancelled my futurlec order. More than 2 weeks after they said it would be 1-2 weeks before the remainder of my items were in stock. dx.com have been far more responsive in customer service and item delivery.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Ufoguy on Aug 11, 2013, 08:43 am
Purchased an SD Card module and an ADXL345 accelerometer.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: K5CZ on Aug 15, 2013, 12:09 pm

OBD was on my wishlist for a long time...

Not so long ago, when I wanted BT OBD too, but my car is full of other crap, so I finally decided that actually I do not need it ;-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 17, 2013, 02:31 am
About 2 lbs of heavy stranded power wire from my scrapper neighbors for $3, salvage price. I haven't tried to measure the lengths (2 hanks) but I'd need some good size spools to wind it on.

A building got taken down and it had a lot of aluminum flex-conduit with wire, junction boxes and switches. This not being Detroit, I know where it came from and that it wasn't stolen but sold off cheap to scrappers to spend the time a destruction crew doesn't have at proper pay to separate materials and parts.

Look around, you might find such a deal. You won't get it from a recycler at that price, it's what they pay!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Aug 17, 2013, 08:25 am
The best is when you find a place getting all the old 25 or 50 pair copper telephone cable being pulled out. Get yourself a 6 or 8 foot length of that stuff, and never worry about breadboard jumpers for the rest of your life!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 17, 2013, 10:52 am
I made my first electric motor out of a hank of that stuff cut off in new construction. That was 1970 or 71. Didn't have heat shrink, just electric tape. It was a bit bulky but it spun.

This stuff is 3-phase power line. But if I can remember to ask the scrappers to look for phone line bundles, I will.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Aug 23, 2013, 01:59 am
For the first time I wanted a slide pot for a project and didn't have them.  Have all sorts of pots, but they are not convenient as a UI control, more of an adjust and forget control.  They ended up being cheaper than I expected.  Got real nice ones for about 70 cents each.  VERY NICE quality, actually.  10K, one is linear, the other is log.

http://www.newark.com/bourns/pta6043-2010cib103/potentiometer-slide-10kohm-250mw/dp/43K0706?Ntt=PTA6043-2010CIB103
http://www.newark.com/bourns/pta4543-2015dpa103/potentiometer-slide-10kohm-125mw/dp/05R8044?Ntt=PTA4543-2015DPA103

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=52046;image)

Also got some mercury switches from a Chinese vendor.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=52048;image)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Aug 23, 2013, 03:42 pm
Hmmm, this thread is still going on.  I was trolling through etsy a few days ago, when I saw an Australian selling wooden momentary contact buttons, and I thought cool.  So I just ordered it, but I haven't gotten it yet.  I ordered 6 buttons, and the price with upgraded shipping was about $35 US.  http://www.etsy.com/listing/160141860/qty-6-custom-order-michael-meissner?ref=col_view (http://www.etsy.com/listing/160141860/qty-6-custom-order-michael-meissner?ref=col_view)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Aug 23, 2013, 07:45 pm

Is it even legal to send mercury through the post?


I started a thread about that subject in General Electronics when I ordered these.  There are several international and domestic sellers of these switches on eBay.  No one seems to be getting busted.  The consensus is that it is legal but you have to declare it as hazardous, which was not done in this case.  Even very reactive chemicals can be shipped if they are declared and the hazardous shipment is paid for, check what this guy wants to ship alkali metals:

http://elementsales.com/pl_element.htm#rb
Policy:  http://www.elementsales.com/hazmatshipping.htm

I have gotten metallic sodium from eBay vendors for far less than him.  I don't think everyone declares hazardous materials properly.  This guy has reasonable shipping:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sodium-Metal-Element-Sample-1oz-Ingot-In-Sealed-Foil-Pack-99-8-Pure-/221260753471

I got a chunk of about a pound or 500 grams for this price years ago.  
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Aug 23, 2013, 08:11 pm

Is it even legal to send mercury through the post?


In the U.S., no...

http://about.usps.com/posters/pos138/pos138_hazard_009.htm

Quote
Mercury, mercury-containing items (thermometer, etc.) ... Mercury and items containing mercury are always prohibited.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Aug 23, 2013, 08:49 pm


Is it even legal to send mercury through the post?


In the U.S., no...

http://about.usps.com/posters/pos138/pos138_hazard_009.htm

Quote
Mercury, mercury-containing items (thermometer, etc.) ... Mercury and items containing mercury are always prohibited.



Just to be clear, it can be sent by UPS and FedEx, they just charge through the nose for the hazardous materials tag.

This memo makes it extraordinarily clear that the shipment I received was actually illegal.  It came China Post / USPS.  Thank you.

When I read the original question I read "the post" as being any major delivery service.  Reading it as the USPS only (when in the United States) is probably the more proper way to read that word.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Aug 23, 2013, 09:45 pm

I have gotten metallic sodium from eBay vendors for far less than him.  I don't think everyone declares hazardous materials properly.  This guy has reasonable shipping:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sodium-Metal-Element-Sample-1oz-Ingot-In-Sealed-Foil-Pack-99-8-Pure-/221260753471

I got a chunk of about a pound or 500 grams for this price years ago.  

I read the listing, and I saw the line, great for the collector or lab.  Lab I can understand, and I would expect to be them to be the primary buyers of Sodium.  Assuming I remember what sodium does from high school chemistry, I can people wanting to see what kind of trouble they can get into with reactive metals.  Chemistry teachers I can see.  I just didn't think that there were people who collected each of the elements, and didn't actually intend to use them.  Must be interesting by the time you get to the transuranic elements.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 24, 2013, 12:37 am
There is at least one reactor that uses molten sodium as the fluid in the heat exchanger. That's a LOT of sodium BTW.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Aug 24, 2013, 12:48 am

There is at least one reactor that uses molten sodium as the fluid in the heat exchanger. That's a LOT of sodium BTW.




It will be a bad day when a new reactor operator tries to top the reactor off with water.   :smiley-yell:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 24, 2013, 01:20 am
The sodium is inside sealed pipes. IIRC the reactor is or was at CERN. They're smart people, not like the cost-cutting for profit and fix-later-forever job security GE management and engineers that built nuke plants in east central USA.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Aug 24, 2013, 10:04 am

Quote
Must be interesting by the time you get to the transuranic elements.

Just hope the delivery time is shorter than the half-life!


Yeah, the last time I ordered a gram of astatine the guy swore it was there when he mailed it.  I guess he had a point. :(
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Aug 24, 2013, 02:00 pm


Quote
Must be interesting by the time you get to the transuranic elements.

Just hope the delivery time is shorter than the half-life!


Yeah, the last time I ordered a gram of astatine the guy swore it was there when he mailed it.  I guess he had a point. :(


It'd make a great base for a "holistic medicine" being self-diluting as it is. That stuff would get more "valuable" with time.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CyberBob on Aug 26, 2013, 02:18 pm
Latest purchase:

Mega 2560 (chinese clone)
W5100 Ethernet shield
2 x Dual H Bridge motor driver boards
50 x RGB common anode LEDs
20 x Infrared universal receivers

All for different projects, though I'll have a go at putting them all in a project together
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Aug 29, 2013, 02:05 am
Can't find the post in this thread, but am appreciative of the Tayda suggestion. Order arrived in 8 days, very well packed. Highly recommended.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: aarondc on Aug 29, 2013, 03:04 am
Switches, with blue leds in them. Toggle, rocker and push button latching. And some with a faux carbon cover - the missile launcher ones. I am a sucker for a switch with a blue led in it. And carbon fiber. Also got some ON/OFF/ON temporary rocker switches.

For anyone who didn't know: Tayda's Facebook page has bi-monthly discount codes netting you 15% off. I didn't know about it for my recent order with them, but will be using it for my next order with them. Well worth checking their page.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Sep 01, 2013, 05:51 am
Radio Shack seems to be having a "Closeout" sale of some of the less popular (?) Arduino/Sparkfun/etc boards.
I picked up a MEGA ADK ($20) and a motor shield ($5)
I am running out of excuses for not diving into the USB host world :-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Sep 01, 2013, 09:59 am

Radio Shack seems to be having a "Closeout" sale of some of the less popular (?) Arduino/Sparkfun/etc boards.
I picked up a MEGA ADK ($20) and a motor shield ($5)
I am running out of excuses for not diving into the USB host world :-)



Questions:
1) does it have to hook up to an Android?
2) can it support a 4-port hub?
3) can you hang a quadram board on it?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Sep 02, 2013, 05:51 am

Can't find the post in this thread, but am appreciative of the Tayda suggestion. Order arrived in 8 days, very well packed. Highly recommended.


I've placed more than a dozen orders with them now and never had a problem.  They quote fairly long shipping times but most of my shipments have come from Colorado and take no more than a week, max.  They are a good company to buy from.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Sep 03, 2013, 08:24 am
Also, my own personal AED
(http://images.costco.com/image/media/oos350-359854-847__2.jpg)
Too many people in my circles have been dropping dead, and since an acquaintance pointed out that anyone can buy these now, it became untenable to perhaps not have one when it was needed.  Sigh.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Sep 03, 2013, 09:44 am

Also, my own personal AED
(http://images.costco.com/image/media/oos350-359854-847__2.jpg)
Too many people in my circles have been dropping dead, and since an acquaintance pointed out that anyone can buy these now, it became untenable to perhaps not have one when it was needed.  Sigh.



Why post a marketing pic and not a pic of your actual unit?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Sep 06, 2013, 02:45 am
I ordered a Rugged Circuits QuadRam board for $25 + ship, $28-something.
http://ruggedcircuits.com/html/quadram.html

That board is on deep discount and when they sell the last in stock, the price goes up.

I gave them a wish list item though. I want banks of memory-mapped I/O and the SRAM if it can work, that would be pin multipliers!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Sep 06, 2013, 08:45 pm
Very useful small DC to DC step-up switching regulator with usb connector. perfect to power an arduino board with a single cell li-po battery via it's usb connector. At this price I ordered 5!

http://www.ebay.com/itm/330819030307?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Sep 10, 2013, 08:52 am
First set of PCBs from iTead.  Nothing exciting; just some DB9 rs232 breakout/analyzers:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cece99 on Sep 10, 2013, 08:54 am
I bought a Samsung 840 EVO 250gb for my pc :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 10, 2013, 09:12 am
Coin acceptor:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399af.jpg)

Unfortunately, you can put a larger coin in than can come out of the reject slot (a design bug, surely?).

See the plastic lip, barely visible, (circled) which prevents a coin that you inserted being retrieved. In this case, an Australian 50c piece, which people here are quite likely to use.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 10, 2013, 09:17 am

I just bought a new kitchen from crapkitchensRus.co.uk


I think I know them. Didn't we get about 1000 spam messages about them? And you know what the annoying thing is? (well, one of them). I don't even live in the UK!

It's like getting a message from "your" bank telling you to log on and "reconfirm" your account details. Except you don't bank with them.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Sep 10, 2013, 09:35 am

Coin acceptor:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399af.jpg)

Unfortunately, you can put a larger coin in than can come out of the reject slot (a design bug, surely?).

See the plastic lip, barely visible, (circled) which prevents a coin that you inserted being retrieved. In this case, an Australian 50c piece, which people here are quite likely to use.


Dremel tool to the rescue!  Add a millimeter!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Sep 11, 2013, 12:09 am
A bunch ($60 worth) of slightly out-of-spec schmartboards (not "schmart enough" they say, the grooves are too shallow).  These boards still solder very well with drag-soldering, I've used them before.

http://www.schmartboard.com/index.asp?page=products_clearance

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=53848)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Sep 14, 2013, 12:06 pm

Also, my own personal AED
(http://images.costco.com/image/media/oos350-359854-847__2.jpg)
Too many people in my circles have been dropping dead, and since an acquaintance pointed out that anyone can buy these now, it became untenable to perhaps not have one when it was needed.  Sigh.



Fantastic idea.... my son learned to use one a couple of years back on his BLS medic training, and now he's an ILS he can use a manual one too. Every home should have one.

But, did you rather not consider that you move in the wrong circles?   :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Oct 15, 2013, 10:30 pm
(reviving this thread from the 3rd page)
Just received my shipment of AbneyPark CDs (http://www.abneypark.com/). Connection to Arduino? Well, it is Steampunk music, and whilst Steampunk is not electronic (or electric) , one sometimes hides (Arduino) electronics inside to make the attraption work. And I found the music by going the reverse of what I just wrote.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Oct 29, 2013, 07:52 am
A few of these:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ag.jpg)

See if you can guess what they are. :)


That was part of an order for:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ah.jpg)

Adapter-things.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Oct 29, 2013, 08:39 am
See if you can guess what they are. :)


Crimper?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 29, 2013, 08:45 am
Quote

See if you can guess what they are. smiley


Some kind of cable clip?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Oct 29, 2013, 11:41 am

See if you can guess what they are. :)


Clip to hold a book open?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: fungus on Oct 29, 2013, 11:48 am
Looks like it clips onto a table and you pass a cable through it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Oct 29, 2013, 11:50 am
"Table" is close.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Oct 29, 2013, 11:51 am
To be honest it is absolutely nothing to do with electronics. More like a party.

This vendor just happened to have them. :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Oct 29, 2013, 11:58 am
For picnics, keeps the tablecloth from blowing away?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: fungus on Oct 29, 2013, 01:57 pm

For picnics, keeps the tablecloth from blowing away?


That was my first thought - tablecloth clips, but I assumed it had to be electrical.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Oct 29, 2013, 08:30 pm
Quote

For picnics, keeps the tablecloth from blowing away?


That was it.

I ordered the BNC adapter and was looking for other related items, and found these instead.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Oct 29, 2013, 11:32 pm
I was thinking the hole could be driven by a servo of some sort, though I was struggling to imagine the kind of arrangement where this would be applied.

I have never heard of Steampunk music, but I am intrigued.  I really like the Myst soundtracks.  If it's anything similar, I think I found a knew genre to heart on Internet radio stations.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Oct 30, 2013, 12:10 am

I have never heard of Steampunk music, but I am intrigued.  I really like the Myst soundtracks.  If it's anything similar, I think I found a knew genre to heart on Internet radio stations.

I tend to not follow most music (except the stuff done at renaissance faires, which is mostly irish inspired), but many of my steampunk friends think Abney Park (http://www.abneypark.com/ (http://www.abneypark.com/)) is one of the main steampunk bands.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Paul__B on Oct 30, 2013, 12:57 pm

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ag.jpg)


I used to use the spring metal version of those in tech drawing.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Oct 30, 2013, 09:14 pm

I tend to not follow most music (except the stuff done at renaissance faires, which is mostly irish inspired), but many of my steampunk friends think Abney Park (http://www.abneypark.com/ (http://www.abneypark.com/)) is one of the main steampunk bands.


I had a listen to them.  Definitely nothing like the Myst soundtrack, which honestly, I only correlated based on the website art.  (sigh -- judging music by the album cover)  Ren Faire is definitely a better description.  Interesting stuff.  Not quite my cup of tea though.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 31, 2013, 03:35 am
That latest Rush album, Clockwork Angels, is strongly influenced by steampunk. It's pretty good.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Oct 31, 2013, 05:30 am
A lupe (or loupe) for magnifying:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ak.jpg)

The clear sides let light in, and keep the target the correct distance away. This shows the detail on a LM358 chip:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399al.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Oct 31, 2013, 09:42 am
Tiny.

THIS is a real Loupe   8)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Oct 31, 2013, 08:53 pm
A lupe (or loupe) for magnifying:


I need one of those!  Those 0.1" ceramic caps and SMT parts can be hard to read.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Oct 31, 2013, 09:06 pm
Let me try it for you:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399am.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Oct 31, 2013, 09:53 pm
This is a perfect add
Best regards
Jantje
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Nov 01, 2013, 04:29 am
I had a loupe prior to getting into electronics.  They used to be very useful for slides and negatives when used with a light box.  Haven't had to use it for that purpose for 10 years so it's now in the electronics lab.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Nov 01, 2013, 09:40 pm
I was shopping for solid-state disk drives online. What do you think of this one?

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399an.png)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Nov 01, 2013, 09:46 pm

Given the picture of the internals I'd be a bit nervous making a purchase.  They seem to have a misunderstanding regarding the word "solid-state".
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Nov 01, 2013, 10:51 pm
There are no jelly wobbly bits .... that makes it solid, see!

:)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Nov 01, 2013, 11:06 pm
Hybrid:  http://www.seagate.com/internal-hard-drives/laptop-hard-drives/laptop-solid-state-hybrid-drive/?sku=ST1000LM014
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 01, 2013, 11:07 pm

I was shopping for solid-state disk drives online. What do you think of this one?

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399an.png)



Check warranty terms. See if they have a factory warranty. What they had last time I bought was a dealer warranty. Once of that was enough for me. The company won't back their own $#!+3 directly.


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Nov 02, 2013, 12:02 am
Hybrid:  http://www.seagate.com/internal-hard-drives/laptop-hard-drives/laptop-solid-state-hybrid-drive/?sku=ST1000LM014


My experience with Seagate laptop drives that have a platter: they are noisy; they run hot.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Nov 12, 2013, 07:06 am
A 555 educational board, you can see the works!

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399aq.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Nov 12, 2013, 07:11 am
Ethernet shield and LM35.... I can now see the house temp from work. Very cool.

Also recently bought 2x Wixels, wireless usb control of robot, quite nifty and dead simple.

And got a distance sensor and Sparkfun line follower sensors, not deployed yet.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 12, 2013, 03:29 pm

A 555 educational board, you can see the works!


And still not have a clue!  XD
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: K5CZ on Nov 14, 2013, 11:03 pm
New power switch for older AC adapter

(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/wpthFdnvM8x04MSNgptUSUsIpcEmboTUnl6B9WugVM0=w276-h207-p-no) (https://plus.google.com/photos/102015928680497864414/albums/5946227769681439473?authkey=COyw6-Dz8p3ytwE)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Nov 15, 2013, 06:31 am
Voltage reference box from eBay:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399ar.jpg)

Supplies 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10V from internal battery. Comes with calibration "certificate".
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Paul__B on Nov 16, 2013, 01:30 pm
Very nice - love the  laser-cut box and it really looks the modern-day part to the old laboratory boxen - but I don't think I could justify the price for the infrequent times I would use it and the battery would run flat for the same reason, which is not good for Li-Polys as I understand.

Given that most digital multimeters have ranges based on "2", it seems only the 10V output is really useful.  (OK, I suppose you use the 2.5V for calibrating Arduinos, eh?)  I note its integral power converter.

Thus provoked, I could consider building one with a different reference and calibrating it from someone's reference - as that one is in the descriptions.  Of course you can say it's not worth the trouble - just buy it!

Interestingly - your photo shows 5 mm LEDs and I thought the pictures on eBay showed SMD.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Nov 16, 2013, 08:42 pm
Good point, it's not identical to the one in the photo on the page I bought it. And I must admit I wondered about the power jack, now I see it is for recharging. Assuming they designed it with low consumption in mind that battery should last a long time.

You have to hold down the only button for a few seconds to "start" it, after which a brief click changes the output level.

I don't know how you know if it needs charging, all the documentation I received is visible in the photo.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Nov 28, 2013, 11:45 pm
I don't know about "much more" complicated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/555_timer_IC

Quote

Depending on the manufacturer, the standard 555 package includes 25 transistors, 2 diodes and 15 resistors ...


This kit has 26 transistors, no diodes and 16 resistors. So about the same complexity.

http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/652-555kit

Datasheet available at that link.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Nov 29, 2013, 12:50 am

I don't know about "much more" complicated.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/555_timer_IC

Quote

Depending on the manufacturer, the standard 555 package includes 25 transistors, 2 diodes and 15 resistors ...


This kit has 26 transistors, no diodes and 16 resistors. So about the same complexity.

http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/652-555kit

Datasheet available at that link.


Hmmm...  Thirty cents or thirty dollars... :smiley-eek-blue:

Still, it looks kinda fun.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Dec 03, 2013, 04:13 pm
I was very naughty and finally bought a standalone oscilloscope, the Owen SDS7102 (http://"http://www.saelig.com/MFR00062/PSBE100008.htm") for $365 with a free case over at Saelig. Still looking for a reasonably-priced signal generator whose output frequencies do not have to exceed 60Hz. All the stuff they have there is either way over spec or not standalone.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Dec 03, 2013, 04:28 pm
Quote
Still looking for a reasonably-priced signal generator whose output frequencies do not have to exceed 60Hz

You can buy AD9850-based devices for about $5 each, with roughly 10mHz resolution up to 40MHz.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Dec 03, 2013, 11:44 pm
Quote
it is not a signal generator,

I'm sorry - you're saying a sinusoid isn't a signal?
Did you mean to say it isn't a function generator?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: waterlubber on Dec 03, 2013, 11:49 pm
Some miscillanious relays for my rocket launcher controller. You've heard of it. Cmon. Goto errors and the lot...:333
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Dec 04, 2013, 03:50 am
Mr and Mrs Crossroads' book... I'm still a teen at heart. Local supplier hopes it's in next weeks consignment.

Another local supplier is waiting for some protoplastic, and I hope they'll remember I want some of it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Dec 04, 2013, 06:12 am
Yes I got my copy a few days ago:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399as.jpg)

It is written by Bob and Kathleen Patterson (CrossRoads and wife).

Saying it is "for teens" is probably an understatement. There is a lot of reference material in this book, including stuff like how to read a datasheet, confronting installation problems, interrupts, watchdog timer, interpreting part numbers, choosing types for C programs, EEPROM, SPI, I2C, and quite a lot more.

There are example circuits, example code, and a lot of other detail.

Let me put it this way: a great number of questions you might have about designing circuits, and writing code, are explained in this book. And if you are unfamiliar with electronics fundamentals, a lot of that is covered as well.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Pedro147 on Dec 04, 2013, 08:34 am
A glowing recommendation Nick. You should do all Crossroads PR - Nice critique  XD

Edit - Nick, you did such a good job that I just put my order in at fishpond.com.au. That's what I call global infiltration
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Dec 04, 2013, 05:14 pm

Quote
Still looking for a reasonably-priced signal generator whose output frequencies do not have to exceed 60Hz

You can buy AD9850-based devices for about $5 each, with roughly 10mHz resolution up to 40MHz.


Thank you, AWOL for the suggestion. There is a plethora out there, next step will be finding one that can handle up to +/-10Vpp and so on. Some seem to offer on-board amplifiers for that. Thanks again.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: microcat on Dec 06, 2013, 01:02 pm
Got one of these puppies a while back.
https://www.olimex.com/Products/AVR/Development/AVR-CAN/ (https://www.olimex.com/Products/AVR/Development/AVR-CAN/)

It is being used as a prototyping board for a work project, made necessary because I exhausted the capabilities of an ATMega328P/MCP2515 combination.  While the board is an excellent design and well-made, I should caution that it is not very "Arduino friendly".    If you are good with microcontrollers, and are looking for a challenge, this would be a candidate worth considering.  On the other hand, if you are new to uC's and Arduino, this cat would probably not be the best choice.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Dec 11, 2013, 04:23 am
Diavolino:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Arduino_forum_91399at.jpg)

It has a similar form factor to the Uno / Duemilanove, but since it doesn't have the USB chip it is cheaper than a Uno (around $US 12).

http://shop.evilmadscientist.com/productsmenu/tinykitlist/180-diavolino

You program via FTDI cable (or the ICSP header). The ICSP header and the chip socket were not part of the kit. Since it doesn't have the USB chip or a power LED it would be suitable for low-power applications.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Dec 11, 2013, 07:20 am
I order crossroad's book and another book on wireless network stuff to learn xbee.
Also ordered a dell computer from MS online store for my new year of contract work. Nice, ah?
One display corner has splitting open seam and the entire screen is warped (not flat). Supposed to be new.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: liuzengqiang on Dec 11, 2013, 07:23 am
Well, when I last time learned interrupts, I was actually a teen and I read a book, not web pages. I'll surely learn it again on paper!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Dec 19, 2013, 01:26 am
(This topic has slid off page 1  :smiley-eek-blue: ! Putting it back now.)

Purchased and received: FPGA Development board https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11953 and/or http://embeddedmicro.com/development-boards/mojo-v3.html 

No plans for it - except to look at FPGA programming. (note the Sparkfun logo: Expert programming skills required ;) ) Theory is fine, but what does it feel like  :smiley-yell: ? ;) But with it the Blinky-LED programs can run incredibly faster. :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Dec 20, 2013, 08:12 am

(This topic has slid off page 1  :smiley-eek-blue: ! Putting it back now.)

Purchased and received: FPGA Development board https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11953 and/or http://embeddedmicro.com/development-boards/mojo-v3.html  

No plans for it - except to look at FPGA programming. (note the Sparkfun logo: Expert programming skills required ;) ) Theory is fine, but what does it feel like  :smiley-yell: ? ;) But with it the Blinky-LED programs can run incredibly faster. :D


Interesting, I got one of these recently:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/261136644066

I have a more substantial FPGA development board but its hard to integrate into a project.  CPLDs are easy to integrate, but they only take small designs.  This is easy to design in and takes the same sort of VHDL or Verilog.  Yours has a more recent chip, but its probably not more powerful for most purposes and is more expensive.  I like these relatively cheap solutions.  FPGA/CPLDs are fun.  If what you are trying to do is just logic, they are so much faster than microcontrollers.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Dec 27, 2013, 01:44 pm
Robin Nixon on PHP etc (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1449319262/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1449319262&linkCode=as2&tag=startielectr-20)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Dec 28, 2013, 04:19 am
How about Christmas, for those who celebrate?  Anything interesting?

I made out like a bandit..  BeagleBone Black from one of my brothers (who doesn't "do this sort of thing", so it was quite a surprise!), another older sibling gave me a nifty solar panel with Li-Ion pack for... whatever I want to do with it.  (I immediately connected it to the BBB.  His wife asks, "don't you use anything as intended?" referring to the cell-phone charging commentary on the box.  "Following directions suggests a lack of imagination," I replied.  XD)

But my better half really took the cake.  Out of nowhere, she risked her life and limbs to enter the spare room I sometimes refer to as my evil genius laboratory, dug through piles of stuff to find my tools, then looked online through maker guides to see what I was missing.  The result: a set of Klein wire strippers (one for 30! to 20 AWG, the other for 18 and up), a big pair of auto-adjusting strippers -- which is a lot of strippers, but seriously, I had been using those cheap crimper/stripper/bolt cutter things from the box stores, or a pair of scissors, or my teeth -- also, a set of Wiha precision screwdrivers and SMD tweezers, a 90-deg angle drill adapter (I had been complaining about tight corners on a subwoofer box I was building), and a Porter Cable oscillating multi-tool.  I was seriously impressed!  I had tool envy for my own tools.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 28, 2013, 11:16 am
Quote
"Following directions suggests a lack of imagination," I replied.


I'll have to remember that when next time the wife asks why I won't stop to ask for directions.  ;)

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Peter_I on Dec 28, 2013, 02:51 pm

How about Christmas......


Lady Nickity bought you, not one, but several strippers for X-mas?

I'm envious!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Dec 28, 2013, 07:53 pm

How about Christmas, for those who celebrate?  Anything interesting?
A new graphics card for the computer. So what to do with the old one (which had started to reset at random times - and couldn't cope with the requirements of SimCity's newest extensions)? Probably can reuse the fan - but with highperformance electronics parts are too specialised for much reuse.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Pedro147 on Dec 30, 2013, 08:57 am
Kathleen and Roberts book arrived today. Looks good, well done :-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: K5CZ on Dec 30, 2013, 09:09 pm
After a really very long time  of deliberation, I finally decided to buy a powerful regulated power supply (thus powerful for my modest needs).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 30, 2013, 09:19 pm
Very nice. Having an adjustable current limit on a bench PS can be a aid in troubleshooting equipment and new circuitry. Helps keep the magic smoke inside the components.  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Dec 30, 2013, 09:24 pm
is it me or ....
The cover says 18V and the LCD says 19.0V  :smiley-eek-blue:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 30, 2013, 09:39 pm

is it me or ....
The cover says 18V and the LCD says 19.0V  :smiley-eek-blue:


Well the LCD says 19.0 vdc, that attached DMM seems to read 19.05 vdc. The panel says it's a 0 to 18vdc voltage range. Sounds all good to me. Keep in mind that there is no current being drawn from the supply at that time.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Dec 30, 2013, 09:51 pm
But it's regulated!   :|  There shouldn't be an unloaded voltage.

That's nice though -- I've been thinking more and more about getting building a programmable bench supply.  In the meantime, I usually put in the smallest fuse that should do the job, plug something in to a power strip, and hide behind the cat as I power it up.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Dec 30, 2013, 09:52 pm
I like that because of the fixed 5 and 12, over and above whatever you choose on the main output.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 30, 2013, 09:57 pm

But it's regulated!   :|  There shouldn't be an unloaded voltage.

That's nice though -- I've been thinking more and more about getting building a programmable bench supply.  In the meantime, I usually put in the smallest fuse that should do the job, plug something in to a power strip, and hide behind the cat as I power it up.


But doesn't that only work up to nine times? How many cats have you used up?

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Dec 30, 2013, 10:32 pm
I try to wear-level between the two, and thankfully their sacrifices have been minimal.  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: K5CZ on Dec 30, 2013, 10:59 pm

is it me or ....
The cover says 18V and the LCD says 19.0V  :smiley-eek-blue:

It must be (probably) a small reserve, the power supply was photographed without a load. With the load will show probably less than 19V. But a little more than 18V is no harm.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: K5CZ on Dec 30, 2013, 11:01 pm

I like that because of the fixed 5 and 12, over and above whatever you choose on the main output.

I like too. But only 0.5A for branch. 5V/0.5 A is usually enough, but 12V/0.5A is insufficient, for example, for LED strips testing.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 31, 2013, 01:03 am


I like that because of the fixed 5 and 12, over and above whatever you choose on the main output.

I like too. But only 0.5A for branch. 5V/0.5 A is usually enough, but 12V/0.5A is insufficient, for example, for LED strips testing.


Well that's when you dial in the 0-18vdc @ 5 Amps. Bet that dog barks.  ;)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Paul__B on Dec 31, 2013, 06:02 am

It must be (probably) a small reserve, the power supply was photographed without a load. With the load will show probably less than 19V. But a little more than 18V is no harm.



But it's regulated!   :|  There shouldn't be an unloaded voltage.


So we have a dispute here.   One says it it s a regulated power supply, the other says it is not.   :smiley-eek:

(Hint: If it is regulated and able to supply full load at full voltage - implies switchmode - then the ability to somewhat exceed the nominal rated voltage is not at all dependent on load.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Dec 31, 2013, 06:50 am
Sorted
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Paul__B on Dec 31, 2013, 11:26 am
Subtle!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: K5CZ on Dec 31, 2013, 04:25 pm
Trolling... as small kids :)

So, here is the factory page:
http://www.manson.com.hk/products/detail/18 (http://www.manson.com.hk/products/detail/18)

And chapter IX. Specification says:
Over Voltage Protection (Main Output): 18~22% at tracking 10.1V <Vout ?19V

I have no idea what this mean, but there is an undeniable existence of value "19V" and maybe it's a relationship.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Dec 31, 2013, 05:20 pm
One thing to know about bench supplies like this is that they can't always supply max amps especially when using outputs as low as for example 1 vdc. A linear regulator can exceed it's maximum heat dissipation before reaching it's maximum output current rating due to the extremely large voltage drop across the regulator when set to lower output voltages.
I've seen some complex designs that lowers the unregulated voltage input to the linear regulator as one lowers the desired output voltage to keep within heat dissipation rating. Only a schematic drawing would tell if there is anything like that used in this unit, but perhaps the owners manual covers the issue?

Back in the 80s we used H.P. bench supplies like this (except metered not digital displays) that would cost around $1,500 or better depending on options. They were bullet proof quality and were hard for even a beginner to damage.

Lefty

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Dec 31, 2013, 09:05 pm
A 5A linear supply?  Wow, I wouldn't have guessed that.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Dec 31, 2013, 09:27 pm
5A linear, aka boat anchor as the EE's who taught me "go for smoke" called them at fests.

I've been wondering if something would work. I have 9V supplies that if I put a 7.5V zener and a good bit of resistor across +9 and GND, would I get 7.5V to a 5V regulator without wasting much power? I am guessing that the resistor would share the heat of 9V down to 5V with the regulator but how to figure the resistor value?

Does that even make sense?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Dec 31, 2013, 10:03 pm
Using a resistor in series with a Zener is a common way to get a voltage reference, but it's of limited value as a regulator.  Basically the current draw has to be exceedingly small, because as you pull variable current from the supply, there will be a corresponding voltage drop.  If you follow this with a traditional linear regulator, sourced from the junction between R1 and D1, the regulator will drop the remaining voltage.  This could be anywhere from the entire voltage difference (at no load) to being already well below the desired regulated voltage (at heavy loads).  If you calculate the max allowable current draw and size the resistor so this load corresponds to the point where its voltage drop results in a perfect Vin for the linear regulator, you can probably make it work, but it's a kludge.

In addition to being dependent on current, using a resistor is not at all an efficient way to drop voltage -- it becomes wasted heat.  However, it's essentially how all linear regulators work (except the resistance is variable depending on the load) and also what makes linear regulators inherently inefficient.

None of that really takes the Zener into much consideration.  For that, you have competing goals:  Keep the resistance high to avoid dumping tons of current through the Zener, which would overheat it and burn it out; and keep the resistance low so you can draw current from the PSU without simultaneously dropping all available voltage through the resistor.  There's a fairly small window where you can satisfy both criteria.

Your line of thinking is how to reduce the heat load on one regulator, correct?.  The simple solution to this is to spread that load among other devices.  One such way is to use a regulator as a controller, and have the load pass through a heftier transistor (and/or parallel transistors).  You can also pre-regulate the voltage so the drop is shared between two or more regulators.  This works, but it's usually not the best approach.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Dec 31, 2013, 10:26 pm
Would an LM317 get around all that? I think I have however many a dollar or two cost from where I fleshed out an order with cheap, interesting-looking parts to justify shipping... in one of my past purchases (back OT?).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Jan 01, 2014, 12:03 am
No, an LM317 is still a linear regulator -- it's just designed to output an adjustable voltage.  You can force a 78xx or 79xx to change their regulated voltage too, if you step outside the typical application design in the data sheet.

Many of the linear regulator datasheets do include schematics for using external transistors though.  Then you're designing a linear regulator that has much in common with a Class B power amplifier, with the same flaws... namely, that Class D amps and switching regulators can be much more efficient for high-current loads, at the expense of being more complicated and not as well behaved if poorly designed or poorly matched to the load.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: waterlubber on Jan 01, 2014, 04:45 am
Air, and some RGB LEDs for my Mood Light (look meh up on Instructables)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jan 01, 2014, 11:43 am
A 99 cent, 12vdc @ 2 amp switching regulated wall transformer with 10 foot cable with standard arduino like connector at a local charity store. Can't have too many of these.

Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nightcrawler218 on Jan 01, 2014, 12:20 pm
2mm & 5mm heat shrink cable.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jan 06, 2014, 03:06 pm
Hi, just used my work bonus to goto Bunnings (DIY) to get materials to build proper shelving to sit on work bench.
Hope to get LED string under lower shelf to light bench area and hooks and bars on side to fasten clip leads, gluegun and heatgun.
Also want to run leads from LAB supply to a series of terminals along front of shelf, sick and tired of banana plug on banana plug on banana plug etc etc..to get juice from supply and provide gnd ref for  test gear.
Have made design so as little timber cutting as possible.
Will let you know how I go.

Tom..... :)  (damn forgot to check if drill is charged..) Have circular saw will attempt carpentry.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Peter_I on Jan 06, 2014, 08:14 pm
A bunch of LEDs in jolly colors from evilbay.

I'm a sucker for LEDs.......they are just so pretty! They shine, they smile to me, they illuminate me!

(or maybe it is just the memories of the anemic green and red LEDs of the late seventies and eighties?)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Jan 06, 2014, 10:58 pm
Quote from: TomGeorge

..to build proper shelving to sit on work bench.


You know this calls for a picture after completing this, don't you ?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Jan 08, 2014, 12:40 am
I was thinking the same thing.  Maybe someone should start a "show off your cool work bench" thread.  I could use some inspiration.

(My work bench is the shield plate from an old LCD monitor, sitting on one of the three unoccupied square feet of floor in my spare room.  But some day...)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jan 08, 2014, 03:45 am
Ordered the laser cut parts for the uFactory robot arm....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jan 08, 2014, 10:03 am
Quote
"show off your cool work bench" thread.

Good idea, it would show the hideous, depressing, uplifting, inspiring places that our ideas and projects have to take form and succeed.

Tom.... :) (Got it together, just a bit of white paint, fit the LEDs, 10 packs of Ibrufen to fix the back) :smiley-sweat:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Jan 18, 2014, 08:36 pm
Hello all!

Okay, my Arduino activity has been zero for a while. Other stuff taking up too much room in my head. Just got my ham technician's license, and bought a Yaesu FT-60R. But what I dropped in to share with you is this, purchased for $45 at the NCARC (http://ncarc.net/) ham fest today. I have yet to plug it in. Didn't come with probes. I think you can see in the pic that the "B (DLY'D) Trigger Slope" pot stem is bent and the collar is broken. It does turn, so maybe the pot is still OK. Seems to not quite have a full range of motion. Seller said the the pots all need cleaning. So, I have a project.  :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 18, 2014, 10:47 pm
Congrats on the tech license!
Good to know that ham fests still live. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Jan 18, 2014, 11:11 pm
Thanks!

Yes, ham fests live. We have 3 more this year that I can think of off the top of my head, here in Colorado.

Landlord came down and gave me a quick intro to scope usage. Seems this one is working fine, other than dirt in the pots and switches. W00T! He also gave me a 10x probe passed along from a friend of his who was at the show when I bought the scope.

The part that really tickles me, now that I'm looking into this? It's apparently worth a lot more than I paid (http://www.testequipmentdepot.com/usedequipment/tektronix/oscilloscopes/475.htm).  ]:) Okay,mine hasn't been refurbed. Do I care? No.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jan 19, 2014, 01:11 am
It's apparently worth a lot more than I paid (http://www.testequipmentdepot.com/usedequipment/tektronix/oscilloscopes/475.htm).  ]:) Okay,mine hasn't been refurbed. Do I care? No.


Professional sellers selling from their own website and directly to their customer base are almost always going to be more than eBay or a hamfest.  At least that is what I have always seen.  In this case, they give a very decent warranty and almost certainly have the expertise to fix it and recalibrate it if something fails.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jan 19, 2014, 07:47 am
Hi, Congratulations on the Tech License, nice CRO, good popular brand.
Excellent price, there will be lots of know-how around if any problems with the unit.

Tom..... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Jan 19, 2014, 04:05 pm

Hi, Congratulations on the Tech License, nice CRO, good popular brand.
Excellent price, there will be lots of know-how around if any problems with the unit.

Tom..... :)


Thanks. Well, if anyone has a 311-1192-00 10K pot w/switch in their back pocket, I'd be interested in that. and the 2 knobs that go on it. It works, at least as far as I can tell just turning it, but the center stem is bent, so there's a catch, where turning the switch stem moves the pot, and vice versa.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on Jan 20, 2014, 01:30 am

Thanks. Well, if anyone has a 311-1192-00 10K pot w/switch in their back pocket, I'd be interested in that. and the 2 knobs that go on it. It works, at least as far as I can tell just turning it, but the center stem is bent, so there's a catch, where turning the switch stem moves the pot, and vice versa.


That may or may not be an easy pot to find; old tek equipment can be hit and miss finding parts. Here's the manual for it, anyhow:

http://bama.edebris.com/manuals/tek/475adm44/

You might be able to find something here:

http://www.qservice.tv/vpasp/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=59&cat=TEKTRONIX+Potentiometers+-+Switches+-+Connectors

I had to order an implosion shield for my Tek 2213 scope (the one that came with the scope was blurred by somebody having sprayed something on it); I think the shield I got came from Eastern Europe or something, but it was the part I needed.

See if you can find the part - or if you can't, email them - maybe they can find you the part you need?

Good luck!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: justjed on Jan 20, 2014, 01:58 am

You might be able to find something here:

http://www.qservice.tv/vpasp/shopdisplayproducts.asp?id=59&cat=TEKTRONIX+Potentiometers+-+Switches+-+Connectors

...

Good luck!


Thanks cr0sh. I actually tried to order from them, but wound up not proceeding, based on the 3 strikes rule:
- required creating an account
- no info on shipping method (I use different addresses for USPS vs. UPS/Fedex)
- Paypal

Too picky? Well, I keep a minimum amount in my Paypal account, and never intended to use it for anything other than incoming. And my CC doesn't work via Paypal -- I guess my carrier just disallows them. I pretty much feel that a real business ought to be able to take cards directly. So, in the short term, I made a wierd face and bent the stem back to straight, but it still catches. Didn't break anything, that I can tell. Might be a function I'll never use anyway. I just like to have things "right".  :smiley-roll:

Sphere Research (http://www.sphere.bc.ca/test/tek-parts/tekpots.html) looks better to me. But they don't have one. :( But I feel more comfortable shooting them an e-mail asking if they can let me know when they find another.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: robtillaart on Feb 08, 2014, 04:04 pm
book - http://www.amazon.com/Arduino-Workshop-Hands-On-Introduction-Projects/dp/1593274483/ -
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51uCx2ShUVL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg)
well written tutorials, projects are build up in complexity. Good book to help explain why Arduino is so much fun.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: John_Smith on Feb 12, 2014, 12:11 am
As an old fart, I had put off buying the FTDI cable ( $ 20 )  to allow in circuit programming, but I had to buy a USB/ttl module at the weekend, for $4, and it has all the pins available, so I fitted a cap for resetting and the project can be reprogrammed via its USB lead.
I bought  spare one at that price, so I saved $16 on the lead for in circuit programing for future projects
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Feb 12, 2014, 01:43 am

As an old fart, I had put off buying the FTDI cable ( $ 20 )  to allow in circuit programming, but I had to buy a USB/ttl module at the weekend, for $4, and it has all the pins available, so I fitted a cap for resetting and the project can be reprogrammed via its USB lead.
I bought  spare one at that price, so I saved $16 on the lead for in circuit programing for future projects


Ever do ICSP sketch uploading using a 'hardware' programmer? It gives one additional options/trade-offs. E-bay has USBasp types for around the same price as the module you bought and often throw in a usb cable.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 13, 2014, 02:24 am
Hi, my workplace had to order 100 12way PCB mount screw terminals.
One of the online suppliers gave us the price we were looking for with 6 day delivery.
On the due day the satchel turned up and out popped the contents in the first picture, a box of 50, a bag of some and a smaller box.
The supplier had to go to, by the looks of it, three different locations in their network to get the required numbers.
Well the bag had 49 items, the small box, I'll let the second picture explain.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Feb 13, 2014, 02:48 am
ha ha.

Sounds like E14, they often fill your order with parts from all over the world. It boggles the mind that they can make money getting one connector from Timbuktu. I guess they don't really but have to be seen to be able to fulfil orders and be a one-stop-shop, or you go elsewhere.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 13, 2014, 05:35 am
Give that man a prize....
Exactly, loose on one and hopefully win a lot on another.

I was in supermarket the other day, major one, got a bag of ice (frozen H2O), got home and found out that it came from interstate, not from local ice maker.
How much energy to make, keep frozen from NSW to VIC, must be some carbon tax in there somewhere, but it was 50cents cheaper than local product.
I usually buy local product but didn't want to get out in heat for just a bag of ice, will think next time.

Tom...... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Feb 13, 2014, 07:04 am
I bought about $25 worth of "old junk" at Goodwill today to tear it down and pull off parts.  I got an Iomega Zip drive with a nice stepper motor, very odd servo (it opens the disc cartridge door, and a few good parts, an XM receiver, two DSL modems/routers with some nice bits, a Walkman CD player (two motors, a bunch of ASICs that I can find datasheets on but are probably useless), a scanner (want to mess with the sensor) and a broken down PS2.  There is an old Atmel controller on one of these, pre-AVR, presumably an 8051, a Renasas controller, several EEPROMs and flash memories, a bunch of crystals and oscillators and regulators, lots of inductors of various types, and one very interesting part I didn't know existed.  It's  apparently 16 transformers inside one surface-mount, approximately quadruple-height chip:

http://www.ic72.com/pdf_file/p/136610.pdf (http://www.ic72.com/pdf_file/p/136610.pdf)  (PN PH406003).

Ever use one of these?  I guess that 1/4 of the chip is used for each Ethernet channel.  There was a separate integrated transformer package for the DSL input.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Paul__B on Feb 13, 2014, 10:14 pm

I got an Iomega Zip drive with a nice stepper motor, very odd servo (it opens the disc cartridge door), and a few good parts,


Arguably more useful as parts than as a reliable data storage medium.   :D


I guess that 1/4 of the chip is used for each Ethernet channel.  There was a separate integrated transformer package for the DSL input.


Well, that makes sense, doesn't it?  Why waste space?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Feb 13, 2014, 10:20 pm
Hi, my workplace had to order 100 12way PCB mount screw terminals.
One of the online suppliers gave us the price we were looking for with 6 day delivery.
On the due day the satchel turned up and out popped the contents in the first picture, a box of 50, a bag of some and a smaller box.
The supplier had to go to, by the looks of it, three different locations in their network to get the required numbers.
Well the bag had 49 items, the small box, I'll let the second picture explain.


That's awesome.  At least it was well-protected!

At an old job, we ordered a NAS (that is, a datacenter NAS with 24 hard drives in a 3U rack shelf) from our typical reseller.  The first thing to arrive was a box about the size of a pair of work boots.  Opened it up, took out the foam supports, and found a smaller box inside.  Opened that, and nestled safely within eggshell padding adhered to the box, was a single sheet of paper:  The software license agreement.

This box was overnighted, BTW.

Since it was a private company bidding on a government contract that required the equipment purchase, that right there is our tax dollars at work.  Makes ya feel all warm and fuzzy inside, don't it?   :smiley-roll:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Feb 13, 2014, 10:23 pm
and one very interesting part I didn't know existed.  It's  apparently 16 transformers inside one surface-mount, approximately quadruple-height chip:  Ever use one of these?  I guess that 1/4 of the chip is used for each Ethernet channel.  There was a separate integrated transformer package for the DSL input.


Isolation transformers.  They're on every Ethernet device, although many of the physical RJ45 jacks have them integrated, so there won't be a separate part on the board.  They provide balanced, differential signaling and remove the likelihood of ground loops and DC offset by having the transceivers electrically isolated from each other.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Paul__B on Feb 17, 2014, 10:22 am
What you can get on eBay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/2004-Acer-AL-1912b-19-LCD-Flat-Panel-Monitor-NOT-Working-/221375541428)!

(Check out the shipping to Australia!)

(No, I'm not bidding against you!   :D)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 17, 2014, 11:55 am
What do you expect it is Worldwide Saver Rate.... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Paul__B on Feb 17, 2014, 01:37 pm

What do you expect it is Worldwide Saver Rate


Marketing?

(Something I do not need - is non-working LCD monitors.  There are at least a dozen monitors sitting on the floor here albeit not necessarily 19", a significant proportion of which are faulty in some way.  The wife is not at all happy.  She would be really happy if I  could flog off any of them for $9.99 plus postage, least of all the non-workers.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Feb 17, 2014, 06:25 pm
I saw a Youtube the other day where a guy built a circuit that allowed him run "dead" CFLs.
Apparently what dies is something in the cheap planned-obsolescence electronics.
If something like that could revive LCD panels then that would be just smiley-dancey wouldn't it?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 17, 2014, 09:36 pm
Hi Paul, some LCD monitors die because of the power supply to the rear light system failing.
You can check by turning the monitor on and with some input that you know should be displayed, look at the monitor surface from the side while shining a torch on it.
If you can see the image then the backlight or its supply is u/s.
And you can get replacements on the tadaaaaa...****internet****  , wow isn't electronics wonderful.

Tom..... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: overkiller on Feb 18, 2014, 09:15 am
Look what beautiful part I bought!

9V Solar Panel, with will charge batteries for me. (Or power up my Attinys), yellow banana plugs, 5 big yellow LEDs and Attiny2313A.


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 18, 2014, 09:30 am
Quote
At an old job, we ordered a NAS (that is, a datacenter NAS with 24 hard drives in a 3U rack shelf) from our typical reseller.  The first thing to arrive was a box about the size of a pair of work boots.  Opened it up, took out the foam supports, and found a smaller box inside.  Opened that, and nestled safely within eggshell padding adhered to the box, was a single sheet of paper:  The software license agreement.

This box was overnighted, BTW.


My aunt, deceased now, when she came to Australia for holiday said that when she worked at Slough Poly, she was a secretary, all software updates at the time was delivered by Sercuricor Deliveries in a similar way.
Big box, inside a very small box, loaded with floppies. This was back in the 70's so they would have been BIG floppies.( 8inch??)

Tom.... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Feb 18, 2014, 10:38 am

Quote
At an old job, we ordered a NAS (that is, a datacenter NAS with 24 hard drives in a 3U rack shelf) from our typical reseller.  The first thing to arrive was a box about the size of a pair of work boots.  Opened it up, took out the foam supports, and found a smaller box inside.  Opened that, and nestled safely within eggshell padding adhered to the box, was a single sheet of paper:  The software license agreement.

This box was overnighted, BTW.


My aunt, deceased now, when she came to Australia for holiday said that when she worked at Slough Poly, she was a secretary, all software updates at the time was delivered by Sercuricor Deliveries in a similar way.
Big box, inside a very small box, loaded with floppies. This was back in the 70's so they would have been BIG floppies.( 8inch??)

Tom.... :)


Most likely 8's. And low capacity at that.

Of course the alternative may have been punched tape.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Paul__B on Feb 18, 2014, 10:11 pm

Hi Paul, some LCD monitors die because of the power supply to the rear light system failing.
You can check by turning the monitor on and with some input that you know should be displayed, look at the monitor surface from the side while shining a torch on it.


I know.   :D

There is a firm in Sydney who actually repairs monitors, strange thought that be.  The fellow turns up to the North Rocks markets, perhaps less regularly than he used to.  Some years ago, I bought a second-hand monitor from him (I mostly buy second-hand monitors - and computers - much cheaper that way) which failed - the backlight - with a bad smell.  I took it back to the markets and he said "no trouble - we will fix it"!  I was somewhat shocked - who repairs monitors these days?  Nevertheless, my son picked it up later from them in the backblocks round Auburn and it proceeded to work just fine.  (Replaced the inverter.)  I forget now just which one it was of course.


If you can see the image then the backlight or its supply is u/s.
And you can get replacements on the tadaaaaa...****internet****  , wow isn't electronics wonderful.


One monitor here - of the said many - is documented on the 'net to simply require replacement of the electrolytics - perhaps $10 from Jaycar.  The problem is - I pick up monitors at garage sales for less than that though the 24" I am presently using did cost all of that.  So that's the situation, I am just a little reluctant to trash the older ones until I have spent the time to conclusively determine they are BER (in the "experimenter" sense).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Feb 19, 2014, 03:59 am
Silicon Labs Si7020 I2C humidity and temperature sensor (see writeup in sensor section for longer description (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=219055.0)). Looks like a nifty replacement for the SHT21, and HTU21D series of DFN6-sized sensors (i.e. 3x3mm) at a great price point ($4 ea with dust shield!). I hope they stick around, and stay at this price point unlike their competitors (the HTU21D is in and out of stock constantly, and the price at Digikey raised 50% to $12.50 ea, a real headache!)

So I bought 5 with the dust shield.  :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Feb 21, 2014, 12:50 pm
Hi everybody, after the last packaging issue I posted the other week, we used the same people to purchase a particular SMPS 5 pin chip to repair a PLC.
Say the number was  yyy-2yyy, we had to wait 6-7 days cos it was not in stock in Australia, fair enough, we were repairing a batch of 15 of these PLC and only one needed this IC. So it was not urgent, ordered 10 units to keep in stock.
6 days later delivery turns up, plastic bag says  yyy-2yyy, but did not contain IC, contained SIM card socket.
Looked up SIM socket, part yyy-4yyy, okay picked up out of wrong bin, phoned supplier, told them situation, fine will send correct part.
4 days later (today) delivery, plastic bag, yyy-2yyy, contents  yyy-4yyy.
Phoned supplier, told story, very sorry, will ring back.
Rang back, sorry cannot supply IC out of stock not able to restock.

Now question, are they really out of stock, could be, or is the IC in some other bin, not yyy-2yyy or conveniently yyy-4yyy and they can't find it?

They are  supposed to have 180 units in stock ,somewhere but can't find them.
It seems this IC is located in one warehouse only ,so that narrows it true location down.

The value of ten of these ICs is $25, so not even worth sending a work experience kid into the warehouse with a cut lunch and a pith helmet, he/she would probably turn feral before  finding it.

They will, when new stock eventually arrives just put, them in the correct bin, (we hope).

There will at sometime out there be some poor sod like us, ordered a part and gets SMPS IC, hopefully not twice.

Tom... :)


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Feb 23, 2014, 07:27 am
Whoo hoo!  Used a charity auction as an excuse to buy the Android tablet I've been thinking of getting, justified by the Android Programming classes I'm taking (or trying to take.)  Tegra "Note 7."  More than I was planning to spend, but the cheap tablets don't seem to have Bluetooth, and it was for a good cause.

Also my first order from DipMicro (random parts including some tiny85s), and "Analysis of Algorithms" (Sedgewick and Flajolet) (which I think I despair of ever actually understanding.  Sigh.)  (Sedgewick's MOOC on (just) Algorithms is very good, though!)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Feb 23, 2014, 09:38 am
Sounds scarey. They use examples? Have student exercises?
That's what got me through advanced maths. When I HAD to do the homework, it really helped!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Feb 23, 2014, 10:06 am
Yikes Tom, the perils of purchasing eh?

______
Rob


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Mar 08, 2014, 02:19 pm
My latest purchase, another 20-foot container (the blue one, that's 3 now, I love shipping containers). This will be the GRAYnomad's man cave from which many exciting Arduino projects will emerge once I line the inside, cut some windows, make some benches and wire up 240 volts.

This was two days ago, I've since levelled it up.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 08, 2014, 02:34 pm

My latest purchase, another 20-foot container (the blue one, that's 3 now, I love shipping containers). This will be the GRAYnomad's man cave from which many exciting Arduino projects will emerge once I line the inside, cut some windows, make some benches and wire up 240 volts.

This was two days ago, I've since levelled it up.


Does this mean the 'nomad has put down roots? Doesn't look like something you can easily tow...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Mar 08, 2014, 02:41 pm
Sort of, we are not planning to go anywhere for a couple of years at least. Still living in the truck but it's parked on our land. We are buying a lot of "stuff" that normal people do, heck we even got a washing machine recently, so much for my minimalist approach to life :)

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Mar 08, 2014, 05:18 pm
Some of you will find this hard to believe.  I have a neighbor (roughly 3/4 mile south and 1/4 mile west) that built a huge garage.  What was interesting, besides being jealous of the garage) was that he had the foundation poured, inspected then he brought in 7 containers.  He then had a backhoe dig out the center of the foundation about 30 feet deep, and a crane lift 5 of the containers and put them in the hole.  Then he covered them all with plastic sheets, and buried them.  After running some equipment over the loose dirt to compact it, he poured the floor inside the foundation, and had the inspectors come out to inspect.

So, the garage is all finished now and looks pretty cool.  All of us are wondering what he is going to do with the containers buried under it.  The left over two containers are setting on the lot along with a few huge rolls of plastic.

So Nomad isn't the only one that love containers.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MichaelMeissner on Mar 08, 2014, 08:21 pm
In terms of standard shipping containers, the US Discovery channel show Mythbusters, seems to go through containers on a regular basis.

Quite a few years back, in Massachusetts, USA there was a retailer (Anthony "Spag" Borgatti) who sold all sorts of things in odd lots at his store Spaggs.  He evidently discovered a loophole in the law, that if he had all of merchandise that wasn't stocked on the shelves in a normal warehouse, he would have to pay taxes on it, but if the stuff was in containers, it theoretically was in transit, so he didn't have to pay taxes on it.  So in the back lot, he had various shipping containers and old trailer trucks holding the excess merchandise. http://wheelockshstoricalblog.blogspot.com/2012/11/worcester-massachusetts_13.html (http://wheelockshstoricalblog.blogspot.com/2012/11/worcester-massachusetts_13.html)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 09, 2014, 12:50 am
It's worse in California, or was. They checked twice a year.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Mar 09, 2014, 03:02 am
So, the garage is all finished now and looks pretty cool.  All of us are wondering what he is going to do with the containers buried under it. 


I bet he's a prepper… trying to get it all in w/o anyone noticing. Same thing happened all over the US in the 60's… many folk started installing nuclear shelters on the sly, hoping that none of their neighbors would notice and come knocking in case of a nuclear attack. Your neighbor evidently didn't want anyone to know about the storage underneath the garage… especially the planning department in town, since every muni employee would then also know where to go in an emergency...

Your neighbors approach sounds hallways workable assuming the soil drains very well and the water table is pretty low. Shipping containers are pretty tough and cheap… but metal only goes so far in terms of resisting water, regardless of how many layers of plastic diapers your neighbor applied. A better approach is spraying an foundation-sealing elastomer on the outside of said containers and then applying several inches of XPS, which won't absorb water and insulates well.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Mar 09, 2014, 04:26 am
5 containers 30' deep, that's one hell of a hole.

Yeah he's probably a prepper, but just in case he's not I wouldn't ask too many questions :)

I'm not a prepper as such but we're mostly off grid and I do like to be as independent of the official infrastructure as possible. Our stocks are low at present but normally we should be able to last for 3 months, no fresh fruit and veggies of course, but overall we'd be pretty comfortable.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Mar 09, 2014, 06:26 am
Yes, it was one big hole.  I'd post the location using google maps, but he might get pissed.

https://maps.google.com/?ll=33.885104,-112.045438&spn=0.001597,0.00327&t=h&z=19

This is after the fill and before the garage went up.  The four containers are off to the right (I messed up counting them).  The plastic is near the house. There are five containers under that garage with one of them sticking past the foundation on the bottom side where the dirt has been disturbed.  The house has been torn down.  There is an 8' block wall around the entire property with steel gates at the front. You can see where they started the wall at the front of the plot.  We all think he's a prepper.  Actually most of us in this area are to some degree.  With the price of gas and distance to a grocery store, we have to be.  I have about two months of staples, a well, a couple of hundred gallons of gasoline, fifty gallons of diesel (tractor), couple of generators, etc.  You know, the basic necessities.

And, this is Arizona, everyone has a gun.  Most of them are wearing a gun most of the time.  A couple of folk out here regularly walk their dog with a gun strapped to their side.  Makes for a very polite neighborhood.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Mar 09, 2014, 07:31 am
Hi, we get our share of extreme paytv shows here, and preppers is one of many.
However you have to say in some respect, who knows what is going to happen in our future.
With environmental extremes (no not going greenhouse soapbox) it may be of value to do some sort of preping, we have become too used to the local supermarket being so close and don't realize they work to minimum inventory maximum product flow.
Turn off the tap and they have no reserves.

Tom......I love living in this part of the world.... :)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 09, 2014, 07:34 am
I bet he's a prepper…


The other possibility is that he is trying to avoid an onerous local taxing authority.  My neighbor built a modest deck.  One day he found two uninvited strangers carefully measuring his new deck.  After a brief confrontation he was informed they had the right and authority to cross a no trespassing sign in order to investigate the un-permitted improvement to his property.  As expected, his property tax was soon increased.

Where I live every square inch of enclosed space and most non-enclosed space is taxable.  A county highway cuts a corner of my property.  In an especially cruel twist, I pay property tax on the easement despite the fact that I cannot touch it in any way.

By burying (hiding) the containers he may hope to avoid a similar fate.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 09, 2014, 10:40 am

I bet he's a prepper…


In a previous life, I worked in aerial reconnaissance, specializing in identifying nuclear missile installations.

I'd say that's no fallout shelter. It's a missile silo.

Compare it with the attached photo taken in Cuba in the early 1960s.


Same thing happened all over the US in the 60's…


More like what was happening all over Cuba in the 1960s. I would suggest this guy isn't seeking to hide from a nuclear attack. He's looking to retaliate.

If pesky local town planning officials come knocking, he can always swat them down with the Second Amendment. And common sense suggests don't annoy the guy with the nukes in his backyard.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Constantin on Mar 09, 2014, 10:20 pm
We all think he's a prepper.  Actually most of us in this area are to some degree.


What a silly rabbit. A real prepper never builds near other people. Makes it too obvious what you're up to. :) Given the quality of gas these days, I hope you cycle through your stuff quickly enough before it decomposes. :D But the location certainly explains the use of plastic sheathing for diapering the containers.

I guess I'm a bit of an optimist or like living like the proverbial grasshopper in a urban environment without nuclear self defense weapons or secret underground vaults. That said, it later occurred to me that there might be perfectly legitimate reasons for the underground containers - such as growing mushrooms, wine storage, or similar purposes. Of course, there could be more 'recreational' things growing down there also. The electrical bill will tell the story...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Chagrin on Mar 10, 2014, 03:21 am
He then had a backhoe dig out the center of the foundation about 30 feet deep, and a crane lift 5 of the containers and put them in the hole.  Then he covered them all with plastic sheets, and buried them.  After running some equipment over the loose dirt to compact it, he poured the floor inside the foundation, and had the inspectors come out to inspect.


The reason why you put plastic under a concrete slab is to prevent moisture from moving upward through the slab. If he draped plastic over the top that's going to have the effect of keeping the moisture in -- not out.

For a nuclear war the best place to be is in one of the old L-carrier vaults (description (http://www.coldwarcomms.org/), example (http://www.coldwarcomms.org/l5/laurelton/DSC00003.JPG)). Doesn't look like much, right? The above-ground buildings are all expected to be lost and the actual vault is underground, encased in "a lot" of concrete with mesh to act as a Faraday cage. One near me is about the size of a basketball court, underground.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: draythomp on Mar 10, 2014, 03:36 am
I don't think he was at all concerned about water.  With the water table at over 400 feet and the rainfall as low as it is, I'll bet he covered them with plastic to keep dirt from messing up the contents, or building up inside them.  I didn't get to see when they filled it, but was told that he actually wrapped it over the top and sides of each container. 

You're right about preppers, he wouldn't want to be this close to anyone else.  So, grow house (there is a big generator on site), storage for something valuable that he wants to protect especially well, extra bedroom?  I drove by it today and he has mounted cameras on the walls, looking at the gate and has no trespassing signs all over the place.

Oh well, he keeps to himself.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Mar 10, 2014, 07:00 am
Hi, probably got a REALLY GOOD WINE CELLAR.........

Or have you seen a TV crew form A&E or Discovery around, new series of Moonshiners, copper pipe and cylinders turned up yet?

Tom......... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: VALERiOSPQR on Mar 10, 2014, 01:37 pm
Hi guys, just bought:
-Arduino Duemilanove
-Arduino UNO R3

Hope to make something cool!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Mar 10, 2014, 01:39 pm
Can you still buy a Duemilanove? Well I suppose you can as you just did :)

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 10, 2014, 03:22 pm

Can you still buy a Duemilanove? Well I suppose you can as you just did :)


Plenty of clones still bring made, it would seem. Not sure why exactly...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 10, 2014, 04:53 pm


Can you still buy a Duemilanove? Well I suppose you can as you just did :)


Plenty of clones still bring made, it would seem. Not sure why exactly...


Because it's still a proven design. The replacement Uno only improved the bootloader somewhat (smaller footprint, faster upload, proper WDT handling) but otherwise nothing lost using the Duem... design.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dannable on Mar 10, 2014, 11:03 pm
I think some of the branded development kits you can buy actually have an even older board inside, the one where you have to select the power source. I suspect that they bought a load but they didn't sell as quickly as they would have hoped?

And on another, unrelated topic, http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-derbyshire-26495922 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-derbyshire-26495922)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Mar 10, 2014, 11:09 pm
I believe you can buy old missile silos in the US as well.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 10, 2014, 11:42 pm

I believe you can buy old missile silos in the US as well.

______
Rob


Minus the missile of course.  ;)

I served at a SAC missile base in the 60s. I didn't work on them, rather I worked teletype/crypto on base, but I did get to tag along with a maintenance crew once to help service some equipment in a LCC (launch control facility) which was  70 feet underground behind a bank like vault door where two officers had control of 10 missiles. Pretty impressive setup to say the least at least to a 19 year old.

They seem to still be operational at that same base today, having read of personal problems lately with the launch control officers cheating of review tests. SAC was a very serious place to be in and work at in those days, I'm sure the thawing of the cold war and the many reorganizations that eliminated the SAC command helped to take the shine off such duty these days. Still impressive that a weapons system designed in the late 50s is still operational to this day.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Mar 11, 2014, 12:24 am
Quote
system designed in the late 50s is still operational to this day.

Yeah, I can't see my Arduino-based sprinkler controller still being used in the 2070s :)

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 11, 2014, 12:30 am
I believe you can buy old missile silos in the US as well.


In some cases ownership of the silo is passed to the current landowner.  A friend of mine was quite pleased about the deal: included with the silo was an enormous copper grounding strap worth about $40,000.  Took him a few days to get it out of the ground but, at least for a while, he was paid about the same as the President.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 11, 2014, 12:46 am

The replacement Uno only improved the bootloader somewhat (smaller footprint, faster upload, proper WDT handling)


I guess different people value "somewhat" somewhat differently. If the price is the same, design A vs design B is a no-brainer if A has disadvantages compared to B, but no compensating advantages.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 11, 2014, 01:19 pm


The replacement Uno only improved the bootloader somewhat (smaller footprint, faster upload, proper WDT handling)


I guess different people value "somewhat" somewhat differently. If the price is the same, design A vs design B is a no-brainer if A has disadvantages compared to B, but no compensating advantages.



  Assuming they are the same price would certainly be a factor. But if the older board is cheaper, burning the Uno bootloader to any older board is a trivial matter that I have done to most all my 328p based boards.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 11, 2014, 02:28 pm



The replacement Uno only improved the bootloader somewhat (smaller footprint, faster upload, proper WDT handling)


I guess different people value "somewhat" somewhat differently. If the price is the same, design A vs design B is a no-brainer if A has disadvantages compared to B, but no compensating advantages.



  Assuming they are the same price would certainly be a factor. But if the older board is cheaper, burning the Uno bootloader to any older board is a trivial matter that I have done to most all my 328p based boards.


Yes, assuming you have a ISP programmer, of course you can easily burn a new bootloader. I certainly would.

But the Duemilanove being cheaper?

If anything, the older board is more likely to more expensive than the Uno, not cheaper, given that one of the drivers of the design changes for the the Uno was make something that was cheaper to manufacture.

Further, we are really talking clones vs clones here, since you can't buy a Duemilanove from Arduino anymore. And a cheaper Duemilanove clone is then going to be beating a sub $10 price for an Uno clone (shipped). So I'd suggest if they are still making Duemilanoves, it's not because they can make and sell them cheaper than the Uno!

FInally, the Duemilanoves have the older pin header layout. (I don't know if that yet creates a practical problem with any of the newer shields out there, but still, it's a consideration.)

In short, I wouldn't bother buying a Duemilanove, and find it hard to figure out why anyone else would buy (or manufacture) one either!

But clearly they are...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 11, 2014, 07:23 pm
How many did they make and how many sold?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Mar 12, 2014, 10:36 am
Quote
Not sure why [people are selling duemilanove clones.]

Uno presents a problem for clone vendors because the 16u2 (or 8u2) chip used for USB/Serial needs to include a vendor code and serial number provided by the manufacturer.  Forging those might be more "actionable" than merely forging the arduino (USB association being a bigger entity than the Arduino company), and getting them wrong results in non-working boards.  In theory, Uno clone boards from companies OTHER than arduino should need separate driver files.

The change in USB chip theoretically allows emulation of USB devices other than serial ports.  That's a need better served by the Leonardo, and I never understood why it was a good idea for Uno in the first place (I've never seen a lot of interest in non-serial USB devices.)  Some of the duemilanove clones are pretty much using "any USB chip that has drivers"; I've seen CP2102 and PL2303 chips that were NEVER used in any official Arduino boards (but they're pretty significantly cheaper and more widely available (to cloners) than the 16u2 or the FTDI chips, I think.)

Personally, I'd like the clone vendors to go all the way back to ther diecimilla era.  I don't like the auto-power-switching on the later boards; I'd rather have a switch.  (Lower overall power consumption and fewer things to go wrong, too.  (There have been a couple of posts recently about people apparently blowing out the opamp...))
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 12, 2014, 01:05 pm

 In theory, Uno clone boards from companies OTHER than arduino should need separate driver files.


I didn't realize that. That's quite interesting, from a number of different angles.


The change in USB chip theoretically allows emulation of USB devices other than serial ports.  That's a need better served by the Leonardo, and I never understood why it was a good idea for Uno in the first place (I've never seen a lot of interest in non-serial USB devices.)


I always got the impression the emulation of USB devices was a bit of an afterthought with the selection of the 8u2/16u2 chips, the prime driver of the change being manufacturing cost. But this business about the firmware in the chips not being legal to clone is also intriguing...


Some of the duemilanove clones are pretty much using "any USB chip that has drivers"; I've seen CP2102 and PL2303 chips that were NEVER used in any official Arduino boards (but they're pretty significantly cheaper and more widely available (to cloners) than the 16u2 or the FTDI chips, I think.)


A matter of terminology, perhaps, but as soon as you deviate from the "official" pcb layout (except for silkscreening) and parts list, I'd say you are now in the realm of "derivatives" rather than "clones." So a 328 board with CP2102? IS it an Uno or a  Duemilanove? Or neither? Neither, I'd be inclined to say.


Personally, I'd like the clone vendors to go all the way back to ther diecimilla era.  I don't like the auto-power-switching on the later boards; I'd rather have a switch.  (Lower overall power consumption and fewer things to go wrong, too.  (There have been a couple of posts recently about people apparently blowing out the opamp...))


I agree -- the simpler designs hark back to more of the "you really can make your own Arduino" era. There is a kind of honesty in that simplicity. Actually, one of my favorite "derivatives" in that vein is the Diavolino (http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2010/diavolino/) -- I like the flames, too! ;-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 12, 2014, 05:49 pm
You can always breadboard a Duino and use an FTDI cable or like to communicate with it.
I don't suppose that anyone has a serial cable that can do the job?

I have a Dontronics Little rAVR dev board for 90Sxxxx chips. It programmed through parallel.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Mar 12, 2014, 08:58 pm

I always got the impression the emulation of USB devices was a bit of an afterthought with the selection of the 8u2/16u2 chips, the prime driver of the change being manufacturing cost. But this business about the firmware in the chips not being legal to clone is also intriguing...


It was.  It's not "illegal" to clone the u2 firmware, but since it's not a dedicated USB-to-serial IC (it's just a micro with support for USB client mode), the developer is responsible for coming up with a valid USB vendor ID.  The USB Forum assigns these, so you can't just make it up, and it's against USB's terms and conditions to use another vendor's ID.  (This is how they ensure the device IDs are globally unique -- by assigning the vendor ID and delegating the responsibility for the device ID uniqueness to the vendor.  That breaks immediately if multiple vendors get to share vendor IDs.)

Vendors have to pay (I think it's $2000?) for a unique vendor ID, and it's not permitted to sub-let them.  So the clone manufacturer is obligated to buy a vendor ID of their own and program the ATmegaXXu2 with their own IDs.  Doing so makes the device unrecognizable to the official Arduino driver (since its keyed to the vendor + product ID pair by USB's design).  You could always hack the driver to include your own IDs and distribute that, but if you have no ethics, it's easier to just steal Arduino's valid IDs and hope for the best regarding potential ID collisions.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 13, 2014, 08:58 am


I always got the impression the emulation of USB devices was a bit of an afterthought with the selection of the 8u2/16u2 chips, the prime driver of the change being manufacturing cost. But this business about the firmware in the chips not being legal to clone is also intriguing...

You could always hack the driver to include your own IDs and distribute that, but if you have no ethics, it's easier to just steal Arduino's valid IDs and hope for the best regarding potential ID collisions.


Unless I misunderstand, if your device is a true clone, then there should be no *practical* issue using the Arduino vendor IDs (ethical issues are another matter, of course). There no chance of a "collision" of any kind occurring -- you *want* your unit to identify to the system as an Arduino device in order to use that driver. OTOH, if you had lifted the ID of another vendor for your *different* hardware, and required your hardware to use a *different* driver, then there is the prospect of a (driver) collison of some sort.

A bit like reusing MAC addresses (DEADBEEFFEED anyone ;-)

So really it just boils down to the "theft" of the IDs. Has Arduino ever complained or made their position public on this point? Does the vendor (Arduino) even have the option to allow "sharing" of the ID if they so wanted under the terms of their agreement with USB Forum (if that's the licensing body.)

Finally, suppose you've developed clone hardware and you *want* it to run using the device driver written by another manufacturer (e.g., Arduino) as described above. Is there a mechanism to do that, apart from spoofing the Vendor ID on your hardware?

Intriguing stuff, particularly int the context of open hardware designs.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 13, 2014, 09:17 am
Finally, suppose you've developed clone hardware and you *want* it to run using the device driver written by another manufacturer (e.g., Arduino) as described above. Is there a mechanism to do that, apart from spoofing the Vendor ID on your hardware?


Under Windows, the "Arduino driver" is the standard Microsoft serial port driver.  The Arduino folks provide a text file that tells the operating system to bind their VID / PID to that kernel driver.  Just like countless other people have done with hardware that behaves like a USB serial port.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 13, 2014, 09:21 am

Finally, suppose you've developed clone hardware and you *want* it to run using the device driver written by another manufacturer (e.g., Arduino) as described above. Is there a mechanism to do that, apart from spoofing the Vendor ID on your hardware?


Under Windows, the "Arduino driver" is the standard Microsoft serial port driver.  The Arduino folks provide a text file that tells the operating system to bind their VID / PID to that kernel driver.  Just like countless other people have done with hardware that behaves like a USB serial port.



And if you are just using an existing driver as you describe, there is no issue of "signed" versus "unsigned" drivers then?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 13, 2014, 09:28 am
And if you are just using an existing driver as you describe, there is no issue of "signed" versus "unsigned" drivers then?


Yes, there is.  You have to sign the text file (indirectly; the cat file is signed).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Mar 13, 2014, 09:30 am

And if you are just using an existing driver as you describe, there is no issue of "signed" versus "unsigned" drivers then?


Yes, there is.  You have to sign the text file (indirectly; the cat file is signed).



And does that signing require spending extra money a Microsoft? (Sorry for all the questions; learning something here.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Mar 13, 2014, 06:53 pm
And does that signing require spending extra money a Microsoft? (Sorry for all the questions; learning something here.)


As far as I know, no, it does not.  I believe you just need a "code signing certificate" # (or something very similar).  For broad distribution, you will have to purchase it from someone who can digitally sign your certificate with a "root level" certificate (the actually signing is done indirectly and automatically).  In the past we've gotten our certificates from Thawte (who was acquired by Veri$ign which broke my heart), Comodo (which caused problems because their root certificate was not generally distributed), and Go Daddy.  Arduino obtained their signed certificate from GlobalSign (http://www.globalsign.com/) (in Windows go to Properties / Digital Signatures for the arduino.cat file).

If the distribution is "in house", you can generate and "self sign" a certificate.  You are responsible for protecting and distributing the root certificate.

In any case, Microsoft does a reasonable job of documenting the requirements and process on their website.  If you want more details I suggest spending some time with Google in case I'm leading you astray.




# Ah, yes, there it is...
• Ensures software came from software publisher
• Protects software from alteration after publication
Enhanced Key Usage = Code Signing (1.3.6.1.5.5.7.3.3)
...the hallmark of a "code signing certificate".
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Mar 13, 2014, 07:35 pm
Unless I misunderstand, if your device is a true clone, then there should be no *practical* issue using the Arduino vendor IDs (ethical issues are another matter, of course). There no chance of a "collision" of any kind occurring -- you *want* your unit to identify to the system as an Arduino device in order to use that driver.


Yes, technically that would work.  However, it's a little like copying the key for a rental car, then helping yourself to the vehicle whenever it's on the lot.

So really it just boils down to the "theft" of the IDs. Has Arduino ever complained or made their position public on this point? Does the vendor (Arduino) even have the option to allow "sharing" of the ID if they so wanted under the terms of their agreement with USB Forum (if that's the licensing body.)


The way I understand it, no, they don't have this option.  The vendor ID is assigned to you as vendor, and TTBOMK it is not permitted to conspire to allow others to use your vendor ID, or to distribute product IDs to other entities.

Finally, suppose you've developed clone hardware and you *want* it to run using the device driver written by another manufacturer (e.g., Arduino) as described above. Is there a mechanism to do that, apart from spoofing the Vendor ID on your hardware?


No.  If you spoof the vendor + device ID of the original part (which, together, I call the product ID -- that may or may not be officially correct), you're basically stealing that from the licensed vendor.  No one's going to care if you do this on a DIY clone for your own use, but the minute you sell that product, it's likely you'll be reading a cease and desist letter soon.  The original author's driver will not acknowledge your compatible device with a different product ID, so you would have to provide your own driver.  That's not a big deal, but it does mean that it's not an exact clone anymore -- it's essentially a different device that performs the same function.  That's splitting hairs somewhat, but if your users have downloaded and installed the Arduino software, an actual Arduino just works.  Your "clone" would also require its own driver to be sourced from your website or included media (yeah right).

I got a little academic with all that talk about device ID collisions before.  The gist is, every vendor gets their own vendor ID and due to the threat of device ID collisions (and it being a breach of licensing terms), only the licensed vendor is allowed to use that vendor ID.  I should've worded the ending better, since using the same vendor and device ID wouldn't be a "collision" per se if it was meant to emulate the original device, but if a device manufacturer stole the vendor ID and made up device IDs from ones that weren't used by existing devices (for example, using the Uno device ID + 1 or whatever to identify "Brand X Uno Ultimate"...) then you run the risk of collisions.  Sorry for the confusion.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Mar 13, 2014, 08:33 pm
That must be why my Teensies need that extra software.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Mar 14, 2014, 01:02 am
@draythomp

That looks like a nice arid area, just the way I like it.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Mar 17, 2014, 01:14 pm
How cute is this! How handy to quickly determine how much current a arduino USB powered board is drawing. I'll let you know how good it works after if arrives. Nice price also.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/390646012397?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Mar 17, 2014, 01:46 pm
Great idea.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Peter_I on Mar 17, 2014, 03:46 pm
A handful of Pro Minis.
They seem to be working perfectly.
(After a bit of trouble connecting them to the USB-adapter  :smiley-red: )

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: robtillaart on Apr 05, 2014, 10:32 am
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51omWI2JhbL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_SX385_SY500_CR,0,0,385,500_SH20_OU03_.jpg)

- http://www.amazon.de/dp/0071771336 -
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nightcrawler218 on Apr 05, 2014, 09:13 pm
Excellent book. Perhaps the best among its kind.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Apr 06, 2014, 04:11 am
TI Connected Launchpad: http://www.ti.com/tool/ek-tm4c1294xl
Several Cypress PSo4 Things, including some bare chips ($1 each!)
   Pioneer: http://www.cypress.com/?rID=77780
   Prototyping kits: http://www.cypress.com/?rid=92146 (what a great idea, as a "sample" alternative!)
I also scored an ST F4 "Nucleo" at EELive:  http://www.st.com/web/catalog/tools/FM116/SC959/SS1532/LN1847/PF260000
So many eval kits, so little time :-(
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Apr 06, 2014, 04:28 am
Those PSoCs look real nice, I got a CD with the dev software a while back but haven't installed it yet. I'm waiting until I get my workshop up and running so I have some space for tinkering.

Quote
So many eval kits, so little time :-(

It's quite amazing what's available these days and all free or near as dammit to free. I don't know if it's better to play with everything or really get to know one family well. You are obviously going for the first option :)

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Apr 06, 2014, 05:28 am
I really like the whole "comparative microcontroller evaluation" things, but it seems to be really difficult to actually get anything "done." :-(   My poor 8-bit PICs seem to have fallen off the low end...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Apr 06, 2014, 10:08 am
Hi, at last more manufacturers realising if they provide an evaluation kit at a good price, (not 100's of dollars), that designers just might use their product.
The power of open sourcing....

Now if  ABB and Seimens can only get down off their high horses?  Ridiculous prices for software for a start.
I avoid both brands like the plague when they say how much their software is, unforunately its there distributors salesman that looses the sale. I was trained on both brands and got sick and tired of keys and security on their software.
Especially when the key was a so-called uncopyable fragile 3 1/2 floppy.

Tom...... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Apr 07, 2014, 01:40 am
That PLC software is really expensive, around $5k per license I believe although I've never bought it myself.

So in an update on my workshop build here are my latest two purchases. First is a new MIG welder

(http://www.robgray.com/photos/images/140309_9EJ1284.jpg)

I need this to make the window frames etc. But it needs a power source of around 6-7000 watts and we live on solar with a 3300-watt inverter. What to do? I know, buy a nice big generator.

(http://www.robgray.com/photos/images/140320_9EJ1287.jpg)

7.5KVA of pure joy :)

So work on the mancave Arduino R&D facility will begin soon.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Apr 07, 2014, 02:43 am
Not enough spec headroom.  10KW would have been cooler.      ]:D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: rockwallaby on Apr 07, 2014, 02:57 am
TomGeorge wrote:
Quote
Now if  ABB and Seimens can only get down off their high horses?  Ridiculous prices for software for a start.
I avoid both brands like the plague when they say how much their software is, unforunately its there distributors salesman that looses the sale. I was trained on both brands and got sick and tired of keys and security on their software.
Especially when the key was a so-called uncopyable fragile 3 1/2 floppy.

Tom, I'm wondering if you meant to say AB, as in Allen Bradley from Rockwell Automation, which manufacture a range of PLCs and VSDs rather than ABB which make VSDs and other power technologies for industry?

Yes, you are correct Rob, the software licence I purchased for AB PLCs, RS5000 produced by Rockwell Software for use with AB Control Logix range of PLCs cost me around $4k and it is only mono OS platform as well.

Guess which one it is that I need to continually keep a current live version of VirtualBox to run this software?
I bought it a few years back now and is well out of date and would not be looking forward to shelling out more money to have it upto date. To make it a bit safer from being a software only licence I have it in a USB security dongle. That allows me to operate it from more than one computer. I just need to make sure I don't loose the silly thing now  :smiley-eek:

As Tom infers, Open Source, love it, and it seems to be a thriving business model. Many who have worked in the traditional business world find it difficult concept to grasp in terms of making any money from it, I am sure.

Tom, I still have some of those 3½" floppies with the activation codes for the older RS500 software for SLC-500 range. A total PITA, but I was able to get around the complex and tricky copy protection and made a few backups, for myself only of course  :smiley-mr-green:

Hence my desire to utilise the micro-controller these days in my industrial applications when it is appropriate. Did I mention your nice Quub design there Rob?

Like Rob, I am also making mancave, I mean new shiny R&D area for our pursuits. New floor is being laid next week as soon as I finish building this current PLC replacing Arduino project.

I haven't bought anything new for a while, I'm setting some money aside for Quub and looking forward to developing with it. Bugger, I mentioned it again?

Anyhow, Rob, that MIG-150 is looking very attractive in its green and black colour.
____
Paul
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Apr 07, 2014, 03:37 am
Hi, Paul, yes ABradley.
I use a different brand PLC in real life, nice free software, upgrade able, and fitted with a retro gradable facility if PLC and software don't quite match version wise. And  very capable programming help here in Australia.

Bob, nice MIG, do you have plasma cutter to go with it to cut the windows out.

Generator..   noise pollution in the bush..    the possums will do despicable things on your roof for keeping them awake.

Tom....... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: rockwallaby on Apr 07, 2014, 04:05 am
Possums, don't talk to me about possums Tom. Each night I get out to chase them from my small veggie garden here on the mountain.

With a bright LED head torch, I scan the bush and see six eyes out of one tree, four from another tree and a single pair out of another, all waiting for their chance. Some are ringtail, which pretty well keep to themselves. It's the big brush tail possum that has 'no fear'.

Wallabies, they're no problem, even cute and inquisitive  :)

That is what I should buy, or even make, an electric zapper. I'm about fed up with so many possums at this time of the year.
Picking up possum cage trap tonight so I can give some of them a holiday to a new location they have never seen before.

Tom, what sort of PLC and software do you use then, I'd like to have another option for PLC only projects possibly?
____
Paul
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Apr 07, 2014, 04:27 am
Quote
Not enough spec headroom.  10KW would have been cooler.

Probably, but a lot more expensive and this one just turned up on Gumtree at the right time (thank's to Paul/rockwallaby for finding it). I've only done a few test welds but it's working pretty well. Even at 150A the gennie hardly misses a beat, but the breakers trip. They seem happy at 120A and for the things I normally do that's plenty, but I will look into those breakers because at full noise the welder should need around 13A+losses and that's under the breaker size AFAIK.

Quote
do you have plasma cutter to go with it to cut the windows out.

I'm very tempted to buy one, they are about $800, I am having a hard time justifying it though as a grinder can do that job easily, that said I could find I go through $200 in blades :) I am also building a roof and may have some clever counter-weighted lift-up walls, a plasma cutter would be very useful for that. As with most tools they aren't worth the money for a single job but over the years you really do get your money's worth from them.

Quote
Generator..   noise pollution in the bush..   

Can't be helped, and worth it not to be connected to the grid IMO.

Quote
the possums will do despicable things on your roof for keeping them awake.

Not my possums, they are way too cute

(http://www.robgray.com/photos/images/140317QP2O0018.jpg)

This mum and bub live between the truck's cab and the luton peak.

Oh, and did I mention the Quub?

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Apr 07, 2014, 05:11 am
An interesting find for me.  At American Science and Surplus they have an random old IC bin and I picked through it and found about eleven CERDIP/quartz window EPROMs and about a dozen 7800 chips.  They all tested out good.  I have a tester that can test most common 7800s and after I removed stickers, cleaned them up, and straightened pins, I erased the EPROMs and then blank checked them, programmed them with random data, and verified them a few times.  All work.  Thirty cents each, a nice score.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=76322;image)

2x 2716, Intel
1x 27128, AMD
7x 27512, 5x AMD, 1x Intel, 1x TI

An eleventh had a weird plastic base plate to it and in trying to remove it I pulled some pins off so I discarded it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Apr 07, 2014, 06:41 am
Been a few years since I used EPROMs.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Apr 07, 2014, 07:07 am
Hi, pity the space shuttle is no more they could have used those eprom chips.

Tom....... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Apr 07, 2014, 07:49 am

Hi, pity the space shuttle is no more they could have used those eprom chips.

Tom....... :)


Some of the oldest stuff is the most fun to work with.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Apr 07, 2014, 11:52 pm

me too, I've got a few UV-Eproms just to be able to build old fashion boards equipped with Z80 and 68000 CPU  :D

also i've got a pretty USB-UV-Eprom programmer  plus an UV eraser smiley-mr-green:


I believe I read in the old days if you just left them outside in the sunlight for a couple of weeks that would erase them also.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Apr 08, 2014, 12:32 am


me too, I've got a few UV-Eproms just to be able to build old fashion boards equipped with Z80 and 68000 CPU  :D

also i've got a pretty USB-UV-Eprom programmer  plus an UV eraser smiley-mr-green:

I believe I read in the old days if you just left them outside in the sunlight for a couple of weeks that would erase them also.


I think you are right.  UV is UV, the exposure time just gets a lot longer that way because the amount of UV is a lot less.  I bet they can erase them in space in an hour, tops.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Apr 08, 2014, 12:56 am
You could buy special UV erasers but we just bought a UV tube form an electrical store. That said we never used EPROMs when developing code, I made an EPROM emulator that could set break points and do other neat stuff I've forgotten now.

Quote
UV is UV

Yes, in fact on a production device you had to place an opaque sticky label over the glass to stop the chip erasing over time.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Apr 08, 2014, 07:15 am
I have lots of UV EPROMs.  We used to use them 8 per board, and they weren't expensive enough to erase stock when the software upgraded.   (Eventually, we went to OTP EPROMs.  But I have a lifetime supply of EPROMs, a programmer, and an eraser.  (and even a PC with a parallel port for the programmer to connect to.  Yeah!)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Apr 08, 2014, 01:55 pm
My FYP had UV-EPROMs, and for a giggle, for the photos in the documentation, I printed (negatives, photo paper, darkroom, enlarger - remember them?)  a photo of a ring-pull can top to cover the quartz window.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on Apr 08, 2014, 02:08 pm
Quote
ring-pull can top to cover the quartz window.

:)

And all before Photoshop.

Quote
negatives, photo paper, darkroom, enlarger - remember them?

Too right I do, I worked in darkrooms for years, B&W printing was my first real job.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Apr 12, 2014, 11:50 am
Hi, I didn,t actually buy it, I won it as prize at an engineering exhibition, two days ago.
Samsung GALAXY Tab3, 10.1 inch screen.
All you had to do was get a card you were given on entry stamped by at least 16 exhibitors, each had an animal stamp to use.
Tom..... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 12, 2014, 01:58 pm
Got a PJRC Teensy 3.1 from OSH Park for under $20 shipped.
Now I need a USB A to micro-B cable or a micro-B adapter to fit, only have USB mini's.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Apr 13, 2014, 05:57 pm

Now I need a USB A to micro-B cable or a micro-B adapter to fit, only have USB mini's.
Ah, yes, have similar problem. I have a box full of redundant USB A to B cables, a large handfull of USB-A to mini, but only have two USB-A to micro-USB - and got in a real panic yesterday as one of those two seemed to have been lost.

I have sort of been waiting for the last USB-A to USB-micro cables to do the same "spontaneous multiplication" the other cables have done, but this has not occured for a year now. So.... Ebay? Amazon? DealExtreme? ... (No you do NOT have to post the links, I can Google, I am just to mean to spend the money :) )
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 13, 2014, 07:42 pm
A lot of them are sold as phone data and charge cables, and a real pain to find. I found a sweet price on a 3-pack and when I went to find it again later, I didn't.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 20, 2014, 02:27 am
So I got my $17 + $2-something shipping PJRC Teensy 3.1 quick from OSH Park only to find that I don't have a cable for the USB micro-B jack on the Teensy 3.1.

Correction. Didn't have a Cable.
Got a pack of 4 Samsung phone charge and data cables (in different bright colors) for $4-something. They work.
Gave the pink one to my friend who likes pink things. Made a bet that her g-daughter will have it by next week.

The Teensy 3.1 works and programs fine though setup was not decision-free but installing Arduino 1.05 fixed that as the needed latest version of Teensyduino is not supported by 1.03 that I've been using.

It's alive! And you can get USB A to micro-B cables cheap through Amazon if you have or know someone with Prime (free 2-day from when the order is sent shipping). You might match that on eBay or elsewhere. The thing is that I had to look in a USB phone cable type category to find that deal at all.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Apr 20, 2014, 12:17 pm
I've had a lot (relatively speaking) of trouble with microUSB cables.  They seem particularly prone to having the wires break off at their connection points to the connectors :-(  If you have communications or power problems with a device that uses a microUSB connector, "suspect the cable" earlier than you might for full-sized USB.  (Also, the attachment of connectors to PCBs seems to be particularly fragile and dependent on surface mount adhesion and copper adhesion to the board.  Apply a little torque in an unexpected direction (which is easy when you have a cable hanging off the connector on a bare board), and POP - off comes the connector.)  (It's all rather annoying, since other points of microUSB are good.  It's spec'ed at more insertion/removal cycles than other usb connectors, and the "fragile" springy part is in the cheap cable instead of the more expensive (to replace) board-mount connector.  Grr.)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Apr 22, 2014, 10:29 pm
Yep.  MicroUSB is a mess of poor implementation.  It's really no wonder Apple chose to go for their own deal.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 23, 2014, 05:23 am
Looking at these cables, I might add some hot glue strain relief.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: waterlubber on Apr 29, 2014, 12:12 am
Bluetooth Adapter thingermajigger: Converts a standard radio into a BLUETOOTH ONE! So amazing. So simple.

ASCII Art:
|^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^|
|         Bluetooth Thing             |------------<==
|      Name:     JX-4159833       |
|                                                      |
|                                                      |------------<==
|__________________|
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: K5CZ on May 05, 2014, 11:18 pm
(http://k5.webhosting.klfree.net/_kokotiny/USB-B%20Female%20panel%20monut%20to%20USB-B%20Male%2090%20degree%20angled%20extension%20cable%20%28detail%20-%20small%29.png)

Now I can put the Arduino deep inside the enclosure and the USB port can be still easily accessible...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on May 06, 2014, 01:14 am
I can't think of any way to make this Arduino related, but what the heck.

I just bought some blacksmithing tools and I plan to set up a space for them, somewhere I can teach myself more about this craft (I have done some before).

Why? I really need a hobby that has nothing to do with computers or even electricity. I'll always be "into" embedded electronics, but a bloke needs some perspective and I've spent too many years sitting on my arse looking at computer screens.


______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: rockwallaby on May 06, 2014, 01:48 am
No need to be so modest Rob, I know that these 'new' tools are in fact the latest range for PCB and assembly.
I notice you got the funky porpose built SMD set, for very fine work, right?
I know you'll be using them soon on the new Quub boards that are currently being built.

But that first tool in your photo list, I'm unsure what that is used for and can only guess it is for bit banging, I know you like serial protocols, right?  :smiley-mr-green:
____
Paul
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on May 06, 2014, 02:22 am
Yes that first item is for banging a bit, or indeed a lot, according to the protocol requirements.

It may actually be quite useful (in conjunction with a 3-pound ball-peen hammer) for fixing electronic devices that piss me off, my iPad for example.


______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on May 06, 2014, 02:29 am

It may actually be quite useful (in conjunction with a 3-pound ball-peen hammer) for fixing electronic devices that piss me off, my iPad for example.


I was just thinking the same. We call that "percussive maintenance" here.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on May 06, 2014, 03:07 am
Just shows that hardware type people use real hardware tools, not those wimpy virtual tool chains that those wimpy software types talk about.  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on May 06, 2014, 03:37 am
Quote
Just shows that hardware type people use real hardware tools, not those wimpy virtual tool chains...

My sediments exactly, time to man up I think :)

GCC, Going Completely Crazy.

Quote
percussive maintenance

Yes an expression we use as well, it seemed to work better with older equipment though, like CRT TVs etc.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on May 06, 2014, 05:14 am
Hi, Rob, isn't it interesting what they can make with 3D printer, don't leave them in the sun too long.

Nice stuff mate, now do you have a blowtorch and shellite fueled plumbers soldering iron.

And it is Arduino related, blacksmithing will excercise zee litle grey cells, after getting them totally fried on the forum, lol.

Tom....... :)

PS, You could get another anvil and with a bit of gun power and a bit of space, blow one high into the stratosphere, just for fun. Place anvils, one on top of the other, top face to top face with power in the cavity, BOOM, hundreds of feet straight up. One of those obscure PayTv programs.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 06, 2014, 05:52 am
I have 2 x
Quote
Serial SPI 2.8"TFT LCD Module Display 320x240 Optional Touch Screen

ordered and hoping that not buying the adapter/Arduino module was the right choice.

It does say SPI and I did go for the ZIF socket, it should provide some kind of breakout.

Shipping > $6 so I didn't order just 1 but I want to look for gotchas as well as likes before buying more.
On site they have bigger screens with different interfaces and character and graphic displays as well.
2x16 LCD's are on special < $2. But watch the shipping, it defaults to the most expensive.
So for my $6-something I have 10 to 30 days wait.

http://www.buydisplay.com/default/serial-spi-2-8-tft-lcd-module-display-320x240-touch-sceen-arduino

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on May 06, 2014, 07:07 am
Hi, I'm looking for something like this for an instrument simulator/calibrator which it looks like I will have to make.
It will be ideal to make a virtual analog meter and trend indicator.

Tom... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on May 07, 2014, 08:16 am
"One pound" inductor grab-bag.  $13, shipped.  I feel like I got a really good deal on this one, here are the parts sorted out.  I have easily more than 100 of 22uH quality inductors here and almost 100 of 56uH ones that are wrapped, plus lots of other values.  The three prong-devices I don't even know what they are, anyone know?  How about those two 12-prong devices?  It seems to be a signal transformer with multiple taps but I haven't figured it out yet.  (edit:  it is not a multi-tap transformer, it is an array of inductors that can be wired in serial or parallel or both to achieve different inductances or current handling capabilities.  http://www.bourns.com/data/global/pdfs/pm600_610_620_series.pdf)

http://www.ebay.com/itm/111324033645

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=80461)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on May 07, 2014, 09:41 pm
I'm not 100 % sure, but the 3 prong devices look like some LC filter to me, consisting of (ferrite) inductor, capacitor and another (ferrite) inductor.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on May 16, 2014, 02:29 am
Just got my shiny new XMOS Start Kit sample!!!


    xCORE-Analog 8-core device with integrated debugger
    micro-USB connection to host debugger
    PCIe connector for sliceCARD add-on boards
    0.1" header compatible with Raspberry PI
    Two 4-zone cap sense sliders
    3x3 LED matrix
    2 additional LEDs
    Push-button switch
    4 ADC inputs
    256KB SPI Flash
    0.1" header for connecting additional startKITs


(http://i464.photobucket.com/albums/rr3/andrew_t1000/Arduino%20Stuff/IMG_5682.jpg) (http://s464.photobucket.com/user/andrew_t1000/media/Arduino%20Stuff/IMG_5682.jpg.html)

Not sure what I'll do with it yet!

As an aside...

I keep reading vitriolic comments, especially on Hack a Day about how bad the Arduino environment is, so far I think it's pretty good.
The XMOS composer software is nowhere as intuitive as Arduino, me thinks it'll be a steep learning curve!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on May 16, 2014, 06:16 am
I've looked at XMOS a few times over the years, very interesting system.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on May 16, 2014, 08:24 pm
Hey watch out man, it looks like the board you got actually has a SOWX chip on it.   XD
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: graynomad on May 17, 2014, 12:59 am
That's one of the key (and under-appreciated) features of that chip, it's an XMOS one way around but can easily be made into a SOWX simply by turning it 180 degrees. As to the difference in functionality, that's not documented very well though.

______
Rob
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on May 17, 2014, 01:51 am
You got me wondering if it'll execute code in reverse

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on May 17, 2014, 02:12 am

You got me wondering if it'll execute code in reverse


It should be the bomb running a disassembler.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on May 17, 2014, 02:34 am
yep, calculating reverse offsets for relative branches will be tricky

but at least "stack collision with heap" will be harder to make happen

Although the idea of negative address space is hard to get your head around
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 17, 2014, 03:33 am
Just swap power and ground?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: cyberteque on May 17, 2014, 04:56 am
So that's where your handle comes from!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 17, 2014, 08:54 am
Learning hardware from a couple of EE's, when they got marginal boards there was the practice of burning hairline traces while chanting "Go for smoke! Go for smoke!". It's kind of a geek rite.
Later when I was involved it was a phrase to let me know I was doing something wrong, but phrased as a question. I guess they got tired of "Nooooo!" and "That was stupid".
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: E40racer on May 17, 2014, 09:54 am
Bought 20 LM2940 5V TO220 regulators on Aliexpress and got burned... Tried out 2 and they are crap. If I try to draw more then 200mA from them the output voltage drops to 2-3V. The input voltage doesn't seem to matter, tried feeding them 6 to 12V. With currents less then 200mA they seem be fine.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on May 17, 2014, 12:07 pm
I also have a bad experience with Aliexpress.
Ordered 5 motors 12 watt BLDC geared motors at topbrand via Aliexpress (95$ a piece exclusive postage). They were advertised as standard out of stock motors.

Quality of the product
Got only 4 (they keep the money for my next buy  :smiley-eek:) because they only made 5 and killed one.
You have 2 wires for power 24 V, 1 wire for speed (PWM  5V) and 1 wire to connect to ground to change the direction (but not 5V resistant)
on one of the motors the PWM and direction are switched => 5V on direction => another motor dead.
So 5 motors mode only 3 survived the first run.


About quality of service:
I send the money on the 16 th of januari (no paypal or visa)
They confirmed receive of the money on 9 feb (due to chineese new year  :smiley-eek:)
They send the motors on the 4th of april (that is about 2 months to ship the products)
The motors arrived the 14th of april.

So 3 months to send 3 working motors of an order of 5 where I need 4 of them. 600$ down the drain  :smiley-eek:

About service after delivery:
Normally they are very responsive but since I reported the dead motor (with picture of the internals to prove the bad connection): Not a single word.

I have plenty of good experiences with chineese companies but this is way over the top.

Jantje



Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on May 17, 2014, 05:08 pm
Maybe Aliexpress should have a picture of an old style Chinese ship as their logo? You know the type, a Junk.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: keeper63 on May 18, 2014, 07:15 am
My most recent purchase (literally just hours ago) was a bunch of components for a new PC workstation (case, psu, mobo, cpu, ram, hdd, ssd - I already have the video card); my current machine is showing its age (a core2duo w/ 4 gig; running Ubuntu 10.04 LTS) - it was an upgrade in 2009, so I think I got my money out of it. The new machine should be much nicer (and I am moving to crunchbang - lean and mean).

Prior to that was my last "real" purchase:

A guy posted on the r/robotics forum (reddit) that he got a deal on a bunch of old robot arms; among them was an old Rhino Robotics XR arm that needs some TLC:

http://www.embeddedrelated.com/showarticle/591.php  (pictures of the arm near the bottom of the post)

I got the arm and controller on Friday; waiting to receive the teach pendent (he forgot to send it along, should be here by Wednesday).

It's missing the lower base timing cog wheel and belt; I've got an email in to Rhino to see if they can give me anything to go on in order to replace it. If not, I'll have to fabricate something I guess.

The arm is quite heavy and robust (so is the controller/power-supply). It needs some cleaning and such as well, but overall is in great shape. One of the quadrature encoder brackets was bent during shipping (easy enough to repair). The controller may or may not work properly - the guy who sold it to me said that the pendent didn't seem to power up when he connected it, but that the controller seemed to be controlling the motors in some fashion when he applied power.

Some of what he said didn't make sense, though, as the motors are brushed DC gear motors (Pittman - very high quality there) with quad encoders - and he said he couldn't turn them when the power was on (not sure how they could "hold station" with only quad-encoders).

Anyhow, worst case is that I'll have to build my own controller in some fashion (I might do that anyhow, but I want to try to get the original controller running first). My plan is restoration of the robot as part of my "vintage computer and robotics" collection.

If anyone has any good information on the robot (looking for actual manuals if possible), I'm all eyes. I've found the common internet stuff - not much out there, unfortunately...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Jun 05, 2014, 11:01 pm

I also have a bad experience with Aliexpress.
Ordered 5 motors 12 watt BLDC geared motors at topbrand via Aliexpress (95$ a piece exclusive postage). They were advertised as standard out of stock motors.

Quality of the product
Got only 4 (they keep the money for my next buy  :smiley-eek:) because they only made 5 and killed one.
You have 2 wires for power 24 V, 1 wire for speed (PWM  5V) and 1 wire to connect to ground to change the direction (but not 5V resistant)
on one of the motors the PWM and direction are switched => 5V on direction => another motor dead.
So 5 motors mode only 3 survived the first run.


About quality of service:
I send the money on the 16 th of januari (no paypal or visa)
They confirmed receive of the money on 9 feb (due to chineese new year  :smiley-eek:)
They send the motors on the 4th of april (that is about 2 months to ship the products)
The motors arrived the 14th of april.

So 3 months to send 3 working motors of an order of 5 where I need 4 of them. 600$ down the drain  :smiley-eek:

About service after delivery:
Normally they are very responsive but since I reported the dead motor (with picture of the internals to prove the bad connection): Not a single word.

I have plenty of good experiences with chineese companies but this is way over the top.

Jantje

It even got worse.
I attached the 2 motors to my robot and .... nothing happened.
I tested the torque and the torque is 0.5NM where the spec of the motor states 2NM.
I had to make a movie to show that the motor simply can not lift more than 0.7KG with a wheel of 0.2m wheel.
The response op topband is even more baffling than anything else I heard from them. I quote:
Quote
controller engineer told me that this motor is without hall sensor, which means if the motor works with higher loading, it will work bad.
usually, the non- hall sensor brushless motor is loaded with a fan or blower which is not big.

you can't always complain our motor, I think you also should consider other possibilities.

So I give them my specs for a driver motor.
Quote
Technical specs:
Voltage up to 29V (battery fluctuates between 29V and 22V)
Driver can be any voltage. Already available are regulated 5V 12V
Stall torque at the wheels should be minimum 8.9NM
rated torque at the wheels should be minimum 1.5NM
rpm at the wheels should be minimum 61
The output watt at the wheels should be substantial above 15

They propose this motor and now it is all my fault ...... :smiley-eek:

So this 95 USdollar motor has a torque of 0.5NM at a RPM of 61. I seriously got ripped off.

My conclusion: stay away from topband.

Frustratedly yours
Jantje
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jun 06, 2014, 01:05 am

So this 95 USdollar motor is not as advertised.


FIFY.  Contact your credit card company and dispute the transaction as not as advertised.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Jun 06, 2014, 01:19 am


So this 95 USdollar motor is not as advertised.


FIFY.  Contact your credit card company and dispute the transaction as not as advertised.

I have been really stupid on this site.no paypal no visa. Direct bank transfer.
Another 30 euro costs.
....
I know .... hard lesson, won't do it again.

Jantje
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Jun 06, 2014, 03:39 am
The Arduino Zero announcement got me all excited, but the SAM D21s aren't available yet, so I thought this would be a start (Atmel SAM D20 Xplained Pro).

Also some interesting Hall-effect sensors from Honeywell (https://sensing.honeywell.com/nanopower?icid=hp_featured_HMSINS). Digital push-pull output, omnipolar operation (senses N or S pole), interesting high-sensitivity, low power design.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Jun 06, 2014, 03:47 am

I have been really stupid on this site.no paypal no visa. Direct bank transfer.
Another 30 euro costs.
....
I know .... hard lesson, won't do it again.

Jantje


I'm a bit confused by this. Aliexpress certainly offer payment via Visa or Mastercard, among other options. (No Paypal though.) I've always used a Mastercard for payment.

Sounds like you weren't actually buying through Aliexpress, but rather directly from the company (Topband)?

Either that, or perhaps you were going through Alibaba rather than Aliexpress (which is more wholesale/b2b oriented, rather than Aliexpress, which is more ebay-like and retail oriented. Prices and "minimum buy" quantities generally reflect that, too.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Jun 06, 2014, 03:55 am

The Arduino Zero announcement got me all excited,


What aspect(s) in particular?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Jun 06, 2014, 05:22 am


The Arduino Zero announcement got me all excited,


What aspect(s) in particular?


Thought the SAM D20/D21 MCUs were pretty interesting.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Jun 06, 2014, 06:27 am

Thought the SAM D20/D21 MCUs were pretty interesting.


What aspect(s) in particular?

(Sorry, I had a  quick look through the datasheet and didn't actually spot anything particularly stand-out that caught my attention, but perhaps I missed something.)

For M0-class devices I'm quite impressed with the NXP "switch matrix" for IO pin function configuration.Just such a cool and clever (and even useful!) feature. I've been playing with some LPC810 8-pin DIPs, looking at them as alternative to ATtiny85s for some applications.

Unfortunately, NXP only offer one other LPC in a DIP package, the LPC1114, which is nice, but only offers 32KB flash and 4KB ram, so apart from being faster (50MHz), doesn't offer much more than a 328-class device, really. Otherwise I'd be all over it.

The free LPCXpresso programming environment is decent enough, too, although a bit too "Eclipsy" for my taste (which is not surprising since the code base is derived from Eclipse, apparently.)

Moving up the ARM foodchain a bit I'm really impressed with what Paul Stoffregen has done with his latest Teensy 3.1 offering. Even 5V tolerant digital IO pins! Just too much bang for buck. It almost hurts to read the datasheet. :-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jun 06, 2014, 07:30 am
Got my Official PJRC Teensy 3.1 through OSH Park, they're still on sale for $17 ea. Shipping ran me less than $3.
One minor PITA was having to get cables to fit, I got a multi-pack of cellphone cables, the USB plug is tiny.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Jun 06, 2014, 11:19 am

I'm a bit confused by this. Aliexpress certainly offer payment via Visa or Mastercard, among other options. (No Paypal though.) I've always used a Mastercard for payment.

Sounds like you weren't actually buying through Aliexpress, but rather directly from the company (Topband)?

Either that, or perhaps you were going through Alibaba rather than Aliexpress (which is more wholesale/b2b oriented, rather than Aliexpress, which is more ebay-like and retail oriented. Prices and "minimum buy" quantities generally reflect that, too.)


Sorry my bad.
I went through Alibaba and then via mail directly. Therefore Alibaba doesn't even know about this deal. As a result I can't even complain or give negative feedback on Alibaba.
I know
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ViF6JRNjTk&feature=kp
Best regards
Jantje
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Jun 06, 2014, 03:54 pm


Thought the SAM D20/D21 MCUs were pretty interesting.


What aspect(s) in particular?


The SAM Ds also have a switch matrix feature which I thought was cool. As are the multiple SERCOM modules, each of which can be configured as SPI, I2C, serial, etc. Bang-for-the-buck is fairly amazing, the top end SAM D20 is under $5 in single quantities, has 256kB flash and 32kB SRAM, and the smaller versions go for half that. I thought the AVRs were pretty reasonably priced, but a 32-bit 48MHz ARM with more and better peripherals makes them seem relatively expensive!

I've looked at the LPC812 as well, and it is also pretty impressive. I was hoping that with the Atmel MCUs, there might be less of a learning curve given that I was pretty comfortable with the AVRs. Not too sure about that now, I should know better than to believe the marketing hype. I'm just starting to explore the ASF doc, lots to digest there, basically a whole layer of APIs to interface to the hardware. It's either that or digest the entire datasheet, which is formidable, then program down to the bare metal. Of course I didn't learn AVRs in a day either. But the SAM chip is more complex in every way. I was looking at the ports last night, instead of three registers that the AVRs use to control the ports, there are no less than thirteen per port.

So we shall see. I'd be interested to hear what you've done with the LPCs and especially interested in how you got up to speed with them. I see that NXP has LPCOpen which I think might correspond to ASF, at least roughly. I think I've got everything I need for the SAM D20 now, took just a bit to find all the parts and there's a lot of learning ahead still of course. Google has not been my friend, there just does not seem to be a lot of learning resources out there for the SAM Ds.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Jun 06, 2014, 06:03 pm



Thought the SAM D20/D21 MCUs were pretty interesting.


What aspect(s) in particular?


The SAM Ds also have a switch matrix feature which I thought was cool.


There you go, I missed that (and I was actually looking for it.)

I'm actually a bit surprised at what Atmel are doing in their ARM line, and perhaps this prejudices me somewhat. To me, they seem to be a bit left-footed somehow in producing a line of chips which synergize well with their AVR line. For example, everyone seems to offer 5V tolerant IO pins on the ARM uCs-- except Atmel! That strikes me as downright odd.

It's been my feeling since the Due that the only reason to choose the ATmel ARM chips for the next generation Arduinos is because of the business relationship Arduino has with Atmel, rather than the technical merits of their ARM chips.I like AVR and I like ARM -- I'm just not been in love with Atmel ARM (so far, anyway.)


Bang-for-the-buck is fairly amazing, the top end SAM D20 is under $5 in single quantities, has 256kB flash and 32kB SRAM, and the smaller versions go for half that. I thought the AVRs were pretty reasonably priced, but a 32-bit 48MHz ARM with more and better peripherals makes them seem relatively expensive!


I think that's true across the industry for the ARM uCs, just amazing bang for buck, which is why I think they are becoming so dominant.


I've looked at the LPC812 as well, and it is also pretty impressive. I was hoping that with the Atmel MCUs, there might be less of a learning curve given that I was pretty comfortable with the AVRs. Not too sure about that now, I should know better than to believe the marketing hype.


Yeah, I think ARM is ARM to a certain extent; you learn the architecture, not the manufacturer so much. I think what varies from manufacturer to manufacturer is the quality of the tools, though. Speaking of which, Atmel have recently released a new very affordable range of debuggers (the "-ICE" range) that cover both AVR and ARM targets. If I was going to get into Atmel ARM, I'd definitely spring for one.


I'm just starting to explore the ASF doc, lots to digest there, basically a whole layer of APIs to interface to the hardware. It's either that or digest the entire datasheet, which is formidable, then program down to the bare metal. Of course I didn't learn AVRs in a day either. But the SAM chip is more complex in every way. I was looking at the ports last night, instead of three registers that the AVRs use to control the ports, there are no less than thirteen per port.


Yup, which is why I suspect that the old 8-bitters will never die away completely. Sometimes that relative simplicity is a definite plus. Paradoxically though, they may get more and more expensive, relatively speaking!


So we shall see. I'd be interested to hear what you've done with the LPCs and especially interested in how you got up to speed with them. I see that NXP has LPCOpen which I think might correspond to ASF, at least roughly. I think I've got everything I need for the SAM D20 now, took just a bit to find all the parts and there's a lot of learning ahead still of course. Google has not been my friend, there just does not seem to be a lot of learning resources out there for the SAM Ds.


I'm still at the beginner stage myself with the LPCs, but I've been quite pleased with what I've seen so far. My feeling is that everything has been made as simple as possible by NXP with the tools and online documentation they offer, and so it comes down to just putting the time in. Graynomad (Rob) has put much more time into the LPC stuff I think, and he seems to making good progress with it.

I think you are right that LPCOpen is roughly equivalent to ASF, but I haven't really got into that as yet. I should really decide to do a proper project with one of these things. Learning seems to accelerate quickly when things start to get "real". :-)

Definitely check out those new -ICE debuggers if you haven't already. The only thing I prefer about my AVR Dragon is that it can also do HVP, which the new debuggers can't (they can only do serial and JTAG programming, I think.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 06, 2014, 06:16 pm
Quote
they seem to be a bit left-footed


Your choice of such a term to signify a negative action might be offensive of those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate, but I'll forgive you just this one time.  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 06, 2014, 06:21 pm

Quote
they seem to be a bit left-footed


Your choice of such a term to signify a negative action might be offensive of those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate, but I'll forgive you just this one time.  ;)


Not for nothing is the Latin for "left", "sinister".....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 06, 2014, 06:30 pm


Quote
they seem to be a bit left-footed


Your choice of such a term to signify a negative action might be offensive of those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate, but I'll forgive you just this one time.  ;)


Not for nothing is the Latin for "left", "sinister".....


Not for nothing is Latin said to be a dead language.  :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Jun 06, 2014, 06:36 pm

those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate


I hope you meant "dominant", but in case you really did mean "dominate", it just reinforces my strong suspicions that the lefties among us really need to be kept under the strictest surveillance and control.

Otherwise, things might get "out of hand" quickly, so to speak. ;-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Jun 06, 2014, 06:37 pm

Not for nothing is the Latin for "left", "sinister".....


Karma bump for the Latinist. :-)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 06, 2014, 06:42 pm


those of us that are left-foot and hand dominate


I hope you meant "dominant", but in case you really did mean "dominate", it just reinforces my strong suspicions that the lefties among us really need to be kept under the strictest surveillance and control.

Otherwise, things might get "out of hand" quickly, so to speak. ;-)



Well you might be one to something.

Quote

As of 2012, three out of the last seven presidents have been left-handed. Counting as far back as Truman, the number is five (or six) out of twelve. In the 1992 election, all three major candidates - George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Ross Perot - were left-handed.[3] The 1996 election also involved three left-handed candidates: Clinton, Perot, and Bob Dole, who learned to use his left hand after his right hand was paralyzed by a World War II injury. In the 2000 election, democratic candidate Al Gore was also left-handed.[9] Both major-party candidates in the 2008 presidential election - Barack Obama and John McCain - were left-handed.[10] The percentage of the population who are left-handed is about 10%.[4] While some write this trend off as a coincidence, others have tried to come up with scientific explanations. According to Daniel Geschwind, a professor of human genetics at UCLA, in 2008: "Six out of the past 12 presidents is statistically significant and probably means something".[4]
Amar Klar, a scientist who has worked on handedness, says that left-handed people "have a wider scope of thinking", and points to the disproportionately high number of Nobel Prize winners, writers, and painters who are left-handed.[6] Michael Peters, a neuropsychologist at the University of Guelph, points out that left-handed people have to get by in a world adapted to right-handers, something which can give them extra mental resilience.[1] The pattern, however, is not replicated in other countries; only two British post-war prime ministers have been left-handed (David Cameron[11] and James Callaghan).[4] Winston Churchill has often been credited with being a left-hander, although he was not.[12]


Lefty
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Jun 06, 2014, 10:07 pm
I've looked at the LPC812 as well, and it is also pretty impressive. I was hoping that with the Atmel MCUs, there might be less of a learning curve given that I was pretty comfortable with the AVRs. Not too sure about that now, I should know better than to believe the marketing hype.


I looked through some of the SAM data sheets hoping for the same thing.  There is a formidable amount of info there, but it is well written and organized -- which incidentally I believe is one of the principle strengths of the AVR line as well.  Graynomad turned me on to LPC, and their data sheets are.... eh..  not as approachable.

In terms of hardware, the Atmel implementations just don't stack up as well.  At least for my purposes.  The flexible serial ports are nice, and they have a dual-core M4 which is pretty sweet.  NXP has a three-core, but it's M4 + M0 + M0.  You lose the second M4 core, which has a substantially improved instruction set, however it can also clock nearly twice as fast (204MHz vs. Atmel's 120MHz.)  And it's like $10 from Digikey.  Yikes that's a lot of power for ten bucks.


Google has not been my friend, there just does not seem to be a lot of learning resources out there for the SAM Ds.


This has been the song of my people in the last few weeks.  Man, it's tough to get started with these things.  At least, it seems that way compared to the AVR world.  There's soooo much documentation, and so many libraries, and plenty of "here's how you open an example project in Eclipse" videos, but not nearly enough of the meat-and-potatoes stuff that I've been looking for.  Conceptual intros (not marketing slides!), toolchain dissection, etc etc.  I managed to upload a demo project to my Xpresso, but I haven't the foggiest notion what actually occurred.   :~


I should really decide to do a proper project with one of these things. Learning seems to accelerate quickly when things start to get "real". :-)


This is how I'm trying to learn, although I probably shouldn't be starting out with such an ambitious project.  Graynomad suggested the LPCs based on some complaints I had trying to accomplish my goals with the ATmega2560, and if I don't crash and burn, it really is a much, MUCH more elegant solution.  So I ended up with an LPC4078 main controller and a pack of LPC812s (with those awesome assignable I/O pins!) as my "Hello World".  Sheesh.  Here's a screen grab of the PCB-in-progress that shall be my development board.  I'm well in over my head, but hey.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Jun 06, 2014, 10:22 pm

This has been the song of my people in the last few weeks.  Man, it's tough to get started with these things.  At least, it seems that way compared to the AVR world.  There's soooo much documentation, and so many libraries, and plenty of "here's how you open an example project in Eclipse" videos, but not nearly enough of the meat-and-potatoes stuff that I've been looking for.  Conceptual intros (not marketing slides!), toolchain dissection, etc etc.  I managed to upload a demo project to my Xpresso, but I haven't the foggiest notion what actually occurred.   :~


You're in good company. Glad to hear it's not just me. I can be fairly thick at times, but... :smiley-eek:  Here (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=245310.0) is a well-timed relevant thread. Describes the feeling pretty well.

Quote

This is how I'm trying to learn, although I probably shouldn't be starting out with such an ambitious project.  Graynomad suggested the LPCs based on some complaints I had trying to accomplish my goals with the ATmega2560, and if I don't crash and burn, it really is a much, MUCH more elegant solution.  So I ended up with an LPC4078 main controller and a pack of LPC812s (with those awesome assignable I/O pins!) as my "Hello World".  Sheesh.  Here's a screen grab of the PCB-in-progress that shall be my development board.  I'm well in over my head, but hey.


Wow, that is ambitious. My immediate goals are along the lines of blink an LED, send "Hello world" to a terminal program, connect something using I2C, something using SPI, etc.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: pico on Jun 07, 2014, 03:16 pm

Wow, that is ambitious.


Agreed. Very impressive. But what does it *do*, exactly? It's an 8 channel... what?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jun 07, 2014, 06:33 pm

My immediate goals are along the lines of blink an LED, send "Hello world" to a terminal program, connect something using I2C, something using SPI, etc.


You're kidding right? At least I got the impression that you're good at things that I'm not.

Have you made an SD card adapter? Do you even have one?






 




Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Jun 07, 2014, 08:04 pm


My immediate goals are along the lines of blink an LED, send "Hello world" to a terminal program, connect something using I2C, something using SPI, etc.


You're kidding right? At least I got the impression that you're good at things that I'm not.


Dead serious, starting out with the basics. Gotta walk before running.

Quote

Have you made an SD card adapter? Do you even have one?


Have a few kicking around, not of my own design, why do you ask?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jun 07, 2014, 11:00 pm
Making an SD card adapter is pne kind of project you described.

Quote

My immediate goals are along the lines of blink an LED, send "Hello world" to a terminal program, connect something using I2C, something using SPI, etc.


According to ATMEL AVR docs I've seen, the hardware serial ports are capable of master-mode-SPI at SPI speed.
Okay so the port has to be the bus master, the MEGA2560 has 3 hardware serial ports to spare.
SD access will run quicker on a dedicated bus to MCU, not having to restart after re-select on a shared bus.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Jun 07, 2014, 11:24 pm

According to ATMEL AVR docs I've seen, the hardware serial ports are capable of master-mode-SPI at SPI speed.
Okay so the port has to be the bus master, the MEGA2560 has 3 hardware serial ports to spare.
SD access will run quicker on a dedicated bus to MCU, not having to restart after re-select on a shared bus.


Ah, the discussion was about ARM, specifically the Atmel SAM D20 chips. Just got the eval board, so just taking first steps with that. Fairly comfortable with the AVRs at this point, at least the ones I've used.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 10, 2014, 03:20 pm
Well to get this thread back on subject, here is a very cool thing I picked up on E-bay a couple of weeks ago. It's a 328P based component tester that really is a useful piece of test equipment. It uses a simple 9 volt batter for power with auto turn-off for long battery life.

So while a decent DMM is still the first peice of test equipment a begineer should get, this could very well be the second best thing to get. If you have any questions let me know.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/291041497713?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Chagrin on Jun 10, 2014, 04:45 pm

Well to get this thread back on subject, here is a very cool thing I picked up on E-bay a couple of weeks ago. It's a 328P based component tester that really is a useful piece of test equipment.


Looks like an Ardutester (http://www.pighixxx.com/lavori/ardutester/). Pighixx' site appears to have fallen off the 'net but you can find schematics/etc. for it from other sites.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 10, 2014, 05:05 pm


Well to get this thread back on subject, here is a very cool thing I picked up on E-bay a couple of weeks ago. It's a 328P based component tester that really is a useful piece of test equipment.


Looks like an Ardutester (http://www.pighixxx.com/lavori/ardutester/). Pighixx' site appears to have fallen off the 'net but you can find schematics/etc. for it from other sites.


Maybe an adaptation. The original source is a German person. Here is a link and if you have goggle translate it you can see some details. It isn't an arduino project but may be adaptable.

http://www.mikrocontroller.net/articles/AVR_Transistortester
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jun 10, 2014, 11:12 pm

Well to get this thread back on subject, here is a very cool thing I picked up on E-bay a couple of weeks ago. It's a 328P based component tester that really is a useful piece of test equipment. It uses a simple 9 volt batter for power with auto turn-off for long battery life.

So while a decent DMM is still the first peice of test equipment a begineer should get, this could very well be the second best thing to get. If you have any questions let me know.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/291041497713?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


For cheap testers I went with these guys.  Frankly, I trust them a lot more than an anonymous Chinese seller:

http://www.peakelec.co.uk/acatalog/jz_dca55.html
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 10, 2014, 11:41 pm


Well to get this thread back on subject, here is a very cool thing I picked up on E-bay a couple of weeks ago. It's a 328P based component tester that really is a useful piece of test equipment. It uses a simple 9 volt batter for power with auto turn-off for long battery life.

So while a decent DMM is still the first peice of test equipment a begineer should get, this could very well be the second best thing to get. If you have any questions let me know.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/291041497713?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


For cheap testers I went with these guys.  Frankly, I trust them a lot more than an anonymous Chinese seller:

http://www.peakelec.co.uk/acatalog/jz_dca55.html


An opinion shared by many. I can only report on my first hand experience with dozens and dozens of E-bay Asian sellers. Never had a problem that they didn't resolve to my complete satisfaction. Only down side is the 10-12 day shipping time but I tend to buy on impulse rather then something I need right now. I also buy stuff from Adafruit and Sparkfun and like their stuff also.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Jantje on Jun 11, 2014, 12:43 am

An opinion shared by many. I can only report on my first hand experience with dozens and dozens of E-bay Asian sellers. Never had a problem that they didn't resolve to my complete satisfaction. Only down side is the 10-12 day shipping time but I tend to buy on impulse rather then something I need right now. I also buy stuff from Adafruit and Sparkfun and like their stuff also.

I would share your opinion .... if it wasn't for my last experience which I shared in this thread.
I'm still talking to them, trying to convince something is wrong. The fact they are talking back confirms that they want to resolve the issue to satisfaction. But this has been going on for months now. Very tiring and in the meanwhile I don't have the stuff.

Jantje

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Jun 11, 2014, 03:51 am
Agreed. Very impressive. But what does it *do*, exactly? It's an 8 channel... what?


8-channel serial console.  Stick it in a rack of network equipment and use the front-panel DB9 to manage them.  If your laptop doesn't have a serial port, use the USB interface.  Or Ethernet to remotely telnet to the ports directly, assuming you (still / already) have network access.  If you don't, the front-panel DB9 supports modem signalling (RI, CD) for out-of-band management.

Like I said.  A good beginner's project, right?   :smiley-roll-sweat:

(Sorry for the derail.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jun 21, 2014, 04:50 pm
Tickets to "MYTHBUSTERS"  stage show here in Australia in August.

Anyone been to one before?

Tom.... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jun 21, 2014, 10:31 pm
You might want to check online if you'll need ear plugs, safety glasses, a hard hat and a vest.
Even if you don't, maybe they'll see you (different than everybody else) and drag you up on stage for something.
Just don't blame me if you lose any fingers or other body parts.

No, really, I love the show and keep asking myself why I didn't do that... for money.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 22, 2014, 06:12 am
Quote
You might want to check online if you'll need ear plugs, safety glasses, a hard hat and a vest.


Not to mention gloves, boots and scba.

And a paramedic...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jun 22, 2014, 06:54 am
Hi, thanks guys, I've just checked my ambulance subscription is all up to date.

http://www.scienceweek.net.au/mythbusters-behind-the-myths-tour-melbourne/

Tom...... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 22, 2014, 07:02 am

Hi, thanks guys, I've just checked my ambulance subscription is all up to date.

http://www.scienceweek.net.au/mythbusters-behind-the-myths-tour-melbourne/

Tom...... :)


You have a Batman Park?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jun 22, 2014, 07:19 am
Hi, yes, unfortunately its not the caped crusader.
John Batman, bought some land of our indigenous people and called it Melbourne.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Melbourne

Tom... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jun 23, 2014, 04:03 pm
Hi, just got a XDRduino MEGA 2560 R3, that I bidded for on ebay, $15.00 Australian, the controller board, nice stack of jumpers for  protobaorad and a 64 x 10 protoboard (with isolated bit in middle of power bus down each side) and a 5V/3.3V power board the mounts on the end of the protoboard.

Got to find time to play with it now.....

Tom..... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 25, 2014, 02:25 pm
Digital calipers.... which interestingly shows on the invoice as a vernier. Seems folk think the measuring instrument itself is called the vernier, whereas those of us in the know know that the vernier is the two-sided misaligning sliding scale thingy that gives us the decimals.

Also a pack of atTinies: no real use for them but just want to make a device which isn't actually wired to my Uno, just for the heck of it.

(I wonder if the adafruit oled library will fit in there....)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jun 25, 2014, 02:31 pm
Hi

Quote
Also a pack of atTinies: no real use for them but just want to make a device which isn't actually wired to my Uno, just for the heck of it.


Same reason I got a few nano and bareduino kits.

Tom.... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Peter_I on Jun 25, 2014, 03:29 pm

Well to get this thread back on subject, here is a very cool thing I picked up on E-bay a couple of weeks ago. It's a 328P based component tester that really is a useful piece of test equipment. It uses a simple 9 volt batter for power with auto turn-off for long battery life.

So while a decent DMM is still the first peice of test equipment a begineer should get, this could very well be the second best thing to get. If you have any questions let me know.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/291041497713?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


That is a cool gizmo!
How well do the measured results fit the expected values?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 25, 2014, 04:41 pm
And a kick-ass bag of random caps for R20... 1.90USD, 1.40EUR, 1.10GBP

Edit: Heaven knows how old and leaky these must be, not one so far has measured at the marked value. Some use the old "MFD" measure for the current "µF" style, so I wonder how old they are?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 25, 2014, 07:06 pm


Well to get this thread back on subject, here is a very cool thing I picked up on E-bay a couple of weeks ago. It's a 328P based component tester that really is a useful piece of test equipment. It uses a simple 9 volt batter for power with auto turn-off for long battery life.

So while a decent DMM is still the first peice of test equipment a begineer should get, this could very well be the second best thing to get. If you have any questions let me know.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/291041497713?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT


That is a cool gizmo!
How well do the measured results fit the expected values?


I only had a precision resistor to check accuracy with at the moment. My 0.05% 250 ohm precision resistor measured 250.5 ohms on the unit, so pretty good. I need to find a precision cap to check that function.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jun 27, 2014, 02:32 pm
Hi, I have a version of that meter and at my workplace we have two. Bought as an assembled PCB and we had to put them in a case.
They have to be one of the most used bits of gear we have, second only to DMM.
Accuracy is about 3 to 5% in most cases, but I like its semiconductor features, identifying devices, BJT, FET, Dual Diode, Diode, measuring Resistor, Inductance and Capacitance, and the main reason we bought them, ESR.
Also the ones that we have tell you the 9V battery voltage on start up.

SMPS capacitor testing is no problem, and cheaper than the PEAK devices.

Tom...... :)

Here it is.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEW-TRANSISTOR-TESTER-CAPACITOR-ESR-INDUCTANCE-NPN-PNP-MOSFET-RESISTOR-METER-/160943358553
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Jun 27, 2014, 05:46 pm
Below is the one I bought. The use of a ZIF socket for attaching components or extension leads is really user friendly. I think any hobbyist should jump on these devices. Most bang for the buck I've seen in years.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/291041497713?_trksid=p2059210.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 28, 2014, 02:20 pm
Nikon DSLR for my daughter's 18th.

(I can't see where the film goes in.....  8) )
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JChristensen on Jun 28, 2014, 02:53 pm

Nikon DSLR


Nice, I keep meaning to do that. Which model?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 28, 2014, 02:57 pm


Nikon DSLR


Nice, I keep meaning to do that. Which model?


Their entry level, D3100
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Jul 01, 2014, 10:50 pm
I got a Panasonic GH3 last year.  Nice little camera, but turns out the body is actually the cheap part.  Figured I could use another hobby that demands lots of money.  Haven't enough of those yet, y'know.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 02, 2014, 02:19 am
Adopt a special needs child.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Jul 02, 2014, 04:12 am
Ah, good idea.  That would take care of all the surplus time and living space I have, too.  :smiley-sweat:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 02, 2014, 11:40 am
You can even die worried about who is going to care for your dependent adult when he/she grows up.
See how I nice I am to think of that?
Next week, how to clean a loaded rifle.  :smiley-eek: j/k!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jul 04, 2014, 02:35 pm
Hi, just bought an ice maker, in WInter.
The wife has been in hospital for 4 weeks due to a fluid retention problem, put on 30kgs in 6 months, one morning woke up looked like she had gone ten rounds with Joe Frasier. Eyes almost closed due to fluid, all the while her doc had been treating her for dietary problems.
Off to hospital in ambulance, they treated her, lost 30 kgs in 4 1/2 weeks, fluid tablets, lot of fluid tablets.
They found she has bad heart, been bad since she gave up smoking 20years ago. So she has to give up Diet Coke, she will only drink ice water, hence the need for an ice maker.
Had to hunt for it, local shops didn't have any, one shop did try for me, to see if any in warehouse.
Ended up getting one on ebay, from local state supplier, $239.00 down to $105.00, included courier delivery.
Nice unit, works well, just got to get used to the clatter of ice cubes into the storage tray ever so often.

Tom... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: mrburnette on Jul 05, 2014, 03:12 am
Playing around with PSoC... Just got a couple in and working through the learning curve.  So far, impressed... Completed the UART & LCD tutorials and will be trying out some of the analog modules.  GNU compiler is C++ capable but default GUI is configured for C.

Ray

http://www.cypress.com/?rid=92146 (http://www.cypress.com/?rid=92146)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jul 06, 2014, 07:28 am
I am a total plonker sometimes. Most of the time probably.

I bought 3 of these (http://www.mantech.co.za/ProductInfo.aspx?Item=72M3994) opto-interrupt thingies yesterday. You can see in the pic there's a plastic locating pin in one corner- I thought that was a moulding error so I snipped it off.

But unfortunately in the process of that snipping I also cut one of the connection legs off, perfectly flush with the housing.  =(

Well, they do say you should buy spares....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jul 06, 2014, 08:22 am

I am a total plonker sometimes. Most of the time probably.

I bought 3 of these (http://www.mantech.co.za/ProductInfo.aspx?Item=72M3994) opto-interrupt thingies yesterday. You can see in the pic there's a plastic locating pin in one corner- I thought that was a moulding error so I snipped it off.

But unfortunately in the process of that snipping I also cut one of the connection legs off, perfectly flush with the housing.  =(

Well, they do say you should buy spares....


For that price, I'd roll my own.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Peter_I on Jul 07, 2014, 02:47 pm


I am a total plonker sometimes. Most of the time probably.
.....
Well, they do say you should buy spares....


For that price, I'd roll my own.



I have a small bag of those. They are everywhere in printers.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: SirNickity on Jul 09, 2014, 12:34 am
But unfortunately in the process of that snipping I also cut one of the connection legs off, perfectly flush with the housing.  =(

Well, they do say you should buy spares....


Yes, you should.  You'll use them eventually anyway!  But, in the meantime, surface-mount that puppy!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: mrburnette on Jul 14, 2014, 07:22 pm

TI Connected Launchpad: http://www.ti.com/tool/ek-tm4c1294xl
Several Cypress PSo4 Things, including some bare chips ($1 each!)
   Pioneer: http://www.cypress.com/?rID=77780
   Prototyping kits: http://www.cypress.com/?rid=92146 (what a great idea, as a "sample" alternative!)
I also scored an ST F4 "Nucleo" at EELive:  http://www.st.com/web/catalog/tools/FM116/SC959/SS1532/LN1847/PF260000
So many eval kits, so little time :-(



I ordered the $4 Cypress 4200 prototyping board.  It worked nicely, but no debug without the $99 dongle.  But, the 4200 Cypress Pioneer board w/ the Arduino-compatible headers is only $25.  I received mine last week and had some quality time with it this weekend.  I'm very impressed.  The 4200 has the 32-bit Cortex M0 core, 4K of SRAM, 32K of flash no eeprom but flash can be substituted easily... yes, user software can write flash!  Code can execute from flash or SRAM!

The PSoC Creator GUI, Compiler (GCC), debugger, and kitchen sink are all in the one package - free.  The debugger works great on the 4200 Pioneer board thanks to the PSoC 5 which is acting as the USB-serial bridge and the debug interface.  Code seems to compile well for speed and small code size.  The compiler and linker can have user-supplied runline parameters set in the GUI as well as lots of customization.  A++ on the effort.  The learning curve is a bit steep, but it may be just me, too.

For $25, the Pioneer board is a must have if you want to do some mixed signal work on a single chip for cheap.  The code developed on the Pioneer can be loaded on the $4 PSoC 4200 prototype board via the serial-USB bootloader - Caveat, the bootloader does take flash and SRAM, so if you want to avoid that, the 4200 'chip' is $1 each any quantity or you can purchase the Programmer for $99 and do anything.

I compiled a simple PSoC 4200 program with an implementation of the ILI9340/9341 TFT SPI library and the stats were:
Quote
Flash used: 14142 of 32768 bytes (43.2 %).
SRAM used: 1688 of 4096 bytes (41.2 %).


The above included the TFT driver library with 20 screen functions, one font, and the main() startup and initialization for the 2.2 inch display with a few lines of graphics.

Oh, the 4200 has a 48MHz system clock!  Sweet for the price.  In my book, this is a buy if you have the patience to read and watch a large number of training videos to jump-start your activities. 
http://www.cypress.com/psoc4200/ (http://www.cypress.com/psoc4200/)


Ray
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: ODwyerPW on Jul 22, 2014, 08:14 pm
I just received my Tiva C-Series TM4C1294XL evaluation board from Texas Instruments. It's the Connected Launchpad version.
See how it goes.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jul 30, 2014, 09:09 pm

I just received my Tiva C-Series TM4C1294XL evaluation board from Texas Instruments. It's the Connected Launchpad version.
See how it goes.
Too bad TI doesn't sample that part (TM4C1294NCPDT).  I don't see why, it's only a $8 part.  I'd rather build my own board.  Using theirs seems like cheating... 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nelsonmilum on Aug 01, 2014, 09:09 am
I recently purchased a new BeagleBoard Black, and a little pile of transistors for a project I'm working on.

I haven't fully wrapped my head around the Beagle yet, but it's a neat little gadget!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Aug 01, 2014, 09:24 pm

I recently purchased a new BeagleBoard Black, and a little pile of transistors for a project I'm working on.

I haven't fully wrapped my head around the Beagle yet, but it's a neat little gadget!


I don't know what you paid for those transistors, but as a word of advice, stay away from NTE anything.  They are overpriced relabeled generics.  NTE261 is an NPN power darlington.  TIP142s would be a generic common replacement.  You can get these very cheaply on eBay:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/20pcs-TIP142-NPN-Transistor-Darlington-100V-10A-/370723688357
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Aug 01, 2014, 09:32 pm
I just got one of these (https://www.robotics.org.za/index.php?route=product/product&path=64&product_id=747) HP LED displays, for no reason other than I think they're cool and remind me of my HP-35 that I got as an undergrad in '74....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nelsonmilum on Aug 02, 2014, 03:25 pm

I don't know what you paid for those transistors, but as a word of advice, stay away from NTE anything.  They are overpriced relabeled generics.  NTE261 is an NPN power darlington.  TIP142s would be a generic common replacement.  You can get these very cheaply on eBay:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/20pcs-TIP142-NPN-Transistor-Darlington-100V-10A-/370723688357


Thanks for the advice! I'm quite sure i overpaid for the transistors, but that's my own fault for not doing any research.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Sep 09, 2014, 05:22 am
Splashed out on a scope. (http://www.citek.co.za/buy/ads-2102b-digital-storage-oscilloscope-100mhz-1gsa-s-2-channel-871763)

EFT'd yesterday, collecting collected it this morning.

(4000ZAR is ~370USD, 290EUR, 230GBP.)

Edit.... great stuff, this 'scope.

Nice automatic setting, so easy to get going. Been looking at Blink doing its thing on pin 13. Setting PWM output according to a pot, nice to see the duty cycle and 'scope automatically gives the mean voltage. Also see the different PWM freq on the 2 odd pins. Noise on a bouncy switch.... It has a one-shot setting so a switch opening or closing freezes on the screen.

So all in all a good buy. Justified due to my daughter starting her BSc in engineering next year.....

edit... it came with EasyScope for my laptop, so just testing to see what the output looks like when attached here as abmp
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Sep 09, 2014, 06:27 am
ARM Cortex-M3 STM32F103C8T6 STM32 Minimum System Development Board
I'm having an interesting discussion off in another forum, on how you can start working with ARM chips for about $1 worth of hardware and 1 minute of tool download time.  (In assembler.  Ouch.)  Using this particular chip (which you can get bare at about 10/$10 and protoPCBs for about 10/$7) (and numerous pre-built boards on eBay for about $7.)  So I ordered this one to see how it works.  (Even though I have other ARM development boards.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Sep 09, 2014, 10:20 am
I'm having an interesting discussion off in another forum


http://www.eevblog.com/forum/microcontrollers/one-dollar-one-minute-arm-development/

My latest is to order a couple of INA125Ps from DigiKey to attempt a project similar to this one:

http://www.instructables.com/id/Arduino-Load-Cell-Scale/
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: mrburnette on Sep 12, 2014, 04:42 pm
A few months ago, I posted about my PSoC Pioneer 4200 board. I was impressed then and I still am; but I am now ready to reveal the however...
Entire post here: http://www.hackster.io/rayburne/psoc-4-the-arduino-killer (http://www.hackster.io/rayburne/psoc-4-the-arduino-killer)

Summary of my 90 days at the current time:

Quote
UPDATE: My view after 90 days...

I am a hobbyist; I am not presently working on any commercial projects.  Essentially, I am retired and just playing with the PSoC.  I have a couple of years of PIC experience and 3 years of Arduino experience and the following summary must be cast in that light.

After 3 months, I am still impressed with the PSoC 4200.  The Cypress Creator 3 programming tool is excellent for a no-cost development environment.  However, even after exploring many parts of the environment over the past months, there are still areas in which I have not ventured. The tool is massive and for a hobbyist spending only a few hours a week, it may be too daunting. Unfortunately, I do not know of much that Cypress can trim because a good portion of the tool is required to utilize the PSoC. Also, the tool integration into the back-end store of component PDF files is necessary. Way too much time must be dedicated initially in reading the various PDF files. The sheer volume of documentation is a two-edged sword; the information is available, but the datasheets on the component configurations can be heavy reading. As I stated earlier, this is a professional development environment and the documentation is professional, too.

Note to anyone following my footsteps: spend the $25 and get the PSoC 4200 Pioneer Kit. You cannot use the internal breakpoint debugger on the $4 Prototype boards. I nearly drove myself crazy trying to use the Arduino serial debugging philosophy; it is simply too crude for the PSoC capabilities. The Pioneer evaluation board shines and the integrated debugging capabilities will return your $25 investment many times over. Additionally, and I consider this important, the Pioneer board is jumper selectable between 3.3 Volts and 5.0 Volts. The $4 Prototype board is always 5V when used with USB and can only be 3.3V when used with an external power supply. If you have 3.3V sensors connected to the Prototype board, you MUST disconnect all 3.3V components before using USB to reprogram the PSoC. The Pioneer board jumper settings for V+ is an efficiency tool and may well save a few 3.3V sensors from cremation.

I am not a professional C/C++ programmer although I have attended professional classes back during the days I was working for 'the man'. Using the Arduino, I never had many issues but the SoC is going to drive a stake into your heart. By default, the PSoC is C-code. There are a few internet articles on how to use C++ with the PSoC but this should not be taken to assume that you can use Arduino libraries... you cannot, unless you rewrite them in C or unless you rewrite a significant amount of Arduino code to interface with the PSoC. I found the Internet articles to be of little value. Most of the time, sections of Arduino libraries (Example: Adafruit GPS) can be extracted and used directly in your own C inline or put into a simple function. For the most part, the Types between the two environments translate at the 16-bit level but the ARM has extended Types to manage the 32-bit variables. So, be forewarned that you will spend some time dealing with type casting.

Praise be to the Arduino team for making things easy for novice programmers and hiding complexity. PSoC will hide nothing from you, so be prepared for a shock. Hardware Pins in the Arduino world are all converted for our convenience to aliases such as D1 and A0. PSoC uses route-able physical pin technology where signals are (for the most part) simply assigned to an arbitrary external pin number and then the whole collection is given a cute name (alias) for code use. This is ultimately flexible but does not automatically transcend from project to project. As your knowledge grows with PSoC you will find yourself evolving your usage of external pins. Unfortunately, few of us actually take the time to return to past projects to bring them in-line with our current knowledge level.

Getting a handle on all of the PSoC configurable hardware, such as Universal Digital Blocks (UDB), can be overwhelming. Everything has a separate datasheet but the TRM (Technical Reference Manual) is the king-book. For the PSoC 4200 series, this document is a 16M Byte PDF file... 678 Pages. Many Arduino users have never opened the Atmega328P reference manual but you will open the PSoC TRM.

The single item that impacts programmer productivity (or ability to just complete a project) is the lack of library support from the community. Remember, libraries are C-centric and not C++, so some of the everyday magic used in Arduino does not translate into PSoC. Critical libraries for Nokia GLCD and TFT Color SPI displays exist and Cypress has an embedded software component for 2x16 Hitacahi LCD but I have found nothing as complete as the Adafruit or Henning Karlsen software. With enough research, you can likely find pieces of the puzzle, but you will likely need to work diligently to complete or perfect the code.

In my opinion, the Cypress PSoC 4 users forum is nothing to write home about - I'm not sure it has reached critical mass and should even be called a forum. The active members are few and because of the nature of the PSoC product, most inquiries generally require uploading a complete ZIP of your project for inspection by others. There are no 'code tags' for the forum and the overall feel is "rough' in my opinion: no edit and no delete at present: to Cypress's defense, I have spoken with one of the EVP and have been informed that improvements are forthcoming. Cypress is a professional company and have a staff of engineers that answer questions relating to product; technical or otherwise, but these inquiries are managed through "case numbers" submission. Cypress sell PSoC in huge quantities to large corporations that demand no-nonsense support. This is not a hobbyist market. If you venture into this world, know that there is no hand-holding like the Arduino forum.

So, my overall summary is mixed: fantastic technology, free development tools, reasonably priced development products, reasonably priced IC's. I am delighted that I have spent a few months in this environment and I have created a few projects but I did cheat somewhat and followed work that I had previously done on the Arduino AVR platform. GPS Clock & Calendar, TFT Color Terminal, Nokia B/W SPI Terminal, 6 channel A/D, etc. I used very little of the overall capability of the PSoC 4200 in the area of configurable hardware; for example, I did not use a single OpAmp. But, I have gotten a taste of the hardware resource editor, the schematic project template, the bootloader, the UART, and the UDB. I really like the concept of PSoC and I have assembled enough of the PSoC 4200 prototype boards ($4) to continue to experiment. I have my 4200 Pioneer board for real-time debugging of my C code and examining the internal workings of the PSoC. (I really, really like this board.) I expect to continue my learning, but I am ready to go back to Arduino for my everyday playtime. Remember, I am a hobbyist and I am not working on commercial "stuff", so I can play with the Arduino and accomplish something in a short matter of time. At $3 each, the Atmega328P-PU are affordable and I have a tube of chips here on the workbench for my own designs. I also like to play with the Attiny85 chips. And then there is the 1284P-PU that I also love in my Bobduino board. Oh, that 8-bit vs 32-bit stuff is way overrated: only a few mathematical functions actually benefit from the 32-bit architecture. Mostly, I found myself having to cast variables to uint8_t in the PSoC. The 48MHz clock is very nice, but it takes more manipulation in many cases. When working with GPS or serial at 19200 BAUD, I saw no differences in human perception between the PSoC and the 8-bit 16MHz Arduino. In the case of the GPS, all of the character gathering from the GPS, the string parsing, the display arrangements, the display output were all accomplished and the Arduino was waiting on the next NEMA sentence to come in from the GPS. Hurry-up and wait in the Arduino translated to hurry-up and wait longer in the PSoC.


Ray


Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Sep 14, 2014, 10:03 am
PSoC 4200:  I bought a 10 of the chips at $1 from Cypress and also bought 3 of their $4 CY8CKIT-049 development USB sticks.  One thing that pisses me off is that the "programmer" on the USB sticks cannot be used to program bare chips.  The bare chips have to be flashed with a bootloader first which requires a "real" programmer.  The cheapest programmer is the MiniProg3 which is $90 and it doesn't look like there are cheap clones on eBay (as there are for so many architectures).  That really irritates me.  I thought I was going to be able to get away with using the  CY8CKIT-049 as a programmer (not as a debugger or emulator though) and I didn't understand the whole bootloader B.S.  Honestly, I thought bootloaders more of an Arduino thing than a normal professional strategy and frankly I have used real programmers/debuggers for everything else other than Arduino.  It's just that I have always been able to get super cheap programmers before.  I don't want to pay $90 just to evaluate a chip.  Not happy.  Did get it to change the blinkenlights speed, though (i.e. the IDE works for me fine with the  CY8CKIT-049).  Still, I would rather work off the board I built out of these now useless bare ICs.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: mrburnette on Sep 14, 2014, 04:26 pm

One thing that pisses me off is that the "programmer" on the USB sticks cannot be used to program bare chips.  The bare chips have to be flashed with a bootloader first which requires a "real" programmer.  .


Now, now...http://www.cypress.com/?id=4&rID=98796 (http://www.cypress.com/?id=4&rID=98796)

Disclaimer... Have not tried it!

Ray
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Sep 15, 2014, 08:11 am


One thing that pisses me off is that the "programmer" on the USB sticks cannot be used to program bare chips.  The bare chips have to be flashed with a bootloader first which requires a "real" programmer.  .


Now, now...http://www.cypress.com/?id=4&rID=98796 (http://www.cypress.com/?id=4&rID=98796)

Disclaimer... Have not tried it!

Ray


Thanks.  I will give this a shot tomorrow to program a dev board that I made via these pins and I will get back to you all on if it worked or not.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Nov 03, 2014, 09:47 am
Some cheap (from China) USB/Serial converters of new types (for debugging/etc) (2102, CH340), and one of the pro-mini clones.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 07, 2014, 11:20 pm
An EL wire "Party Pack" from Amazon for $14-some. It's got 4 9 ft. EL wires with battery pack controllers. Think real thin high efficiency neon. The controller has 1 button to make steady glow, slow flashing, faster flashing. This Party Pack comes in 4 colors.

I read the wire can be cut and spliced. It's a solid copper core coated in phosphors with a real thin wire spiral wrapped around that then clear plastic sheathed and finally a color filter outer layer. AC (IIRC 10KHz) applied makes it glow, and it does look good.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Nov 10, 2014, 12:04 pm
An OEM copy of Windows 8.1
The kids have moved on to 7 or 8.1 quite a while back, but my VMs are still running XP.
I'm not really looking forward to increasing all the VM disk sizes; are there any instructions people have successfully used for minimizing the disk consumption of W8?  (I want to run Atmel Studio, or CCS, or Keil, or PSoC designer.  I don't need a bunch of consumer-oriented apps with "live tiles.")
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Nov 22, 2014, 10:30 pm
I recently received my Saleae Logic Pro 16.

https://www.saleae.com/ (https://www.saleae.com/)

This has support for analog channels. For example, on a 8 MHz clock signal:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Saleae_Logic_Pro_16_a.png)

At 50 MHz capture on the analog channel it is struggling slightly with getting the timing right (it saw 60 nS when it should be 62.5 nS).

The second screenshot shows it measuring a 125 kHz signal:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Saleae_Logic_Pro_16_b.png)




It still supports protocols like SPI:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Saleae_Logic_Pro_16_c.png)

And now you can search for a particular piece of data, like where in my capture there is MOSI signal with the (ASCII) letter "b" in it:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/Saleae_Logic_Pro_16_d.png)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Nov 23, 2014, 05:45 am
Nick, bought a Saleae logic 16 a year ago on your recommendation.
I very much like the new beta software that has been released for it.

Got a DSO for analog stuff as this Saleae version has limitations you alluded to.
Not sure the analog venture is a good one.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Nov 23, 2014, 07:54 am
Should be NA
A slight problem with 768.6 Gs  ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Nov 29, 2014, 07:27 am
Just for the hell of it I got an RFID kit (https://www.robotics.org.za/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=236&search=rfid).

Also a Trinket (Tiny 85 on a board), a DHT11 module and (at last) a DS1307RTC module to save messing around with the loose chip, loose battery and tiny crystal.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 30, 2014, 02:20 am
1/4W Resistance Metal Film Resistors (400-Piece Pack)                US$ 3.38    
Jtron 20050299 MP3 Decoder Board w/ TF / USB - Green                US$ 2.99    
22mm x 3mm Piezo Buzzers - Black (DC 9V / 5-Pack)                    US$ 1.84    
12mm 5mW Red Laser Diode Modules - Black (DC 4.5V / 10)        US$ 3.26    
Jtron 16P Integrated Circuit Socket / Socket MCU - Black (10 PCS)    US$ 1.98
Super Loud USB Powered 2 x 3W Digital Power Amplifier Board - Green (2.5~5V)    US$ 1.88
10pin 2.54mm Female Pin Headers - Black (5PCS)                          US$ 2.20
ENC28J60 PCB Ethernet Module w/ SD Card Module - Blue            US$ 5.51
ADXL345 Digital 3-Axis Gravity Acceleration Sensor Module - Blue    US$ 2.92

The order and free shipping took so long that I forgot all that I had ordered!

I might be able to handle the Ethernet learning curve. I think my PC Ethernet has 2 connectors and 1 is used by my HDSL modem. It's going to take an expedition under the PC table to verify that. And I just had a thought... a cable might cost as much or more than the module itself.
This may be a good use for my Mega2560 with 512K board.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Nov 30, 2014, 05:20 pm
The DHT11 and DS1307 are now incorporated in my Arduino server here (http://jimboza.gotdns.com:8085/).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 30, 2014, 05:29 pm
The DHT11 and DS1307 are now incorporated in my Arduino server here (http://jimboza.gotdns.com:8085/).
That is just the kind of project I need to try somehow. I bet it is not BWD simple though!

Is the ethernet connect through your PC or direct through web modem?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Nov 30, 2014, 05:47 pm
It's not difficult if you steal zoomkat's code, and he and SurferTim helped with explaining how to get visible to the outside world.

The Ethernet is cabled to my router; port 8085 is forwarded, and from dyn.com I got a url which is linked to my router's wan side ip address so the url always works even though my isp changes the ip all the time.

Here's the code although it needs tidying up; PaulS will shit himself when he sees my indents. If you want to discuss further we can do that in a thread in the main forum. That way you'll get help from those who know tons more than I do.


Code: [Select]
// based on zoomkat 4-1-12

//jim 7 dec 2013 with my details- ip address etc
// ST's socket fix thingy added 22 nov 2014
// added temp and rh with dht11 30 nov 2014
// added ds1307 30 nov 2014

#include <SPI.h>
#include <Ethernet.h>
#include <utility/w5100.h> // st fix
#include <utility/socket.h> //stb fix
#include <dht11.h>
#include <Wire.h>
#include <Time.h>
#include <DS1307RTC.h>


dht11 DHT;
#define DHT11_PIN 5 //ethernet shield uses 4



unsigned long connectTime[MAX_SOCK_NUM]; //st fix

byte socketStat[MAX_SOCK_NUM]; //st fix


byte mac[] = {
  0xDE, 0xAD, 0xBE, 0xEF, 0xFE, 0xED }; //physical mac address
byte ip[] = {
  10, 0, 0, 200}; // ip in lan
byte gateway[] = {
  10, 0, 0, 2 }; // internet access via router
byte subnet[] = {
  255, 255, 255, 0 }; //subnet mask
EthernetServer server(8085); //server port

String readString;

const int chipSelect = 4;
//////////////////////

void setup(){
  Serial.begin(9600);

  // to be safe, disabling SD explicitly
  pinMode(4, OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite(4, HIGH);


  //start Ethernet
  Ethernet.begin(mac, ip, gateway, gateway, subnet);
  server.begin();


  Serial.println("Server page test"); // so I can keep track of what is loaded
  Serial.print("Server is at lan ip ");
  Serial.println(Ethernet.localIP());
  Serial.println(millis());
  Serial.print("Setup finished");
}

void loop(){
  //read dht
  //int chk;
  //chk = DHT.read(DHT11_PIN);
  DHT.read(DHT11_PIN);
  
    tmElements_t tm;
    
    
  // Create a client connection
  EthernetClient client = server.available();
  if (client) {
    while (client.connected()) {
      if (client.available()) {
        char c = client.read();

        //read char by char HTTP request
        if (readString.length() < 100) {

          //store characters to string
          readString += c;
          Serial.print(c);
        }

        //if HTTP request has ended
        if (c == '\n') {

          ///////////////
          Serial.println(readString); //print to serial monitor for debuging
          

          client.println("HTTP/1.1 200 OK"); //send new page
          client.println("Content-Type: text/html");
          client.println("Connection: close");  // the connection will be closed after completion of the response
          client.println("Refresh: 600");  // refresh the page automatically every 10 mins
          client.println();

          client.println("<HTML>");
          client.println("<HEAD>");
          //client.println("<TITLE>ArduinoMation test page</TITLE>");
          //display temp in browser tab
          client.print("<title>");
          client.print("JimboZA");
          client.println("</title>");
          //client.println("<link href=\"jimza.ico\" rel=\"icon\" type=\"image/x-icon\" />");
          client.println("</HEAD>");
          client.println("<BODY>");

          client.println("<H1>JimboZA's Arduino web server</H1>");

          client.println("<H3>Thanks to Arduino forum guys for help</H1>");
          client.println("<br />");
          client.print("Especially zk for the underlying code and ST for the socket problem fix");

          client.println("<br />");
          client.println("<br />");
          client.print("Refreshes every 10 mins, or hit browser's refresh");

          client.println("<br />");
          client.println("<br />");

          client.print(millis());
          client.print(" milliseconds since reset or power up");
          client.println("<br />");
          
          client.print("Temperature ");
          //client.print(analogRead(5)/2);
          client.print(DHT.temperature,1);
          client.print("C");
          client.println("<br />");
          
          client.print("Relative Humidity  ");
          //client.print(analogRead(5)/2);
          client.print(DHT.humidity,1);
          client.print("%");
          client.println("<br />");
          
           if (RTC.read(tm)) {
           client.print("Time SAST and Date DMY ");
           client.print(tm.Hour);
           //client.println("<br />");
           client.write(':');
    client.print(tm.Minute);
    //client.print(':');
    //client.print(tm.Second);
    //Serial.print(", Date (D/M/Y) = ");
    client.write('   ');
    client.print(tm.Day);
    client.print('/');
    client.print(tm.Month);
    client.print('/');
    client.print(tmYearToCalendar(tm.Year));
        //client.write(' DMY');
           }
          

          client.println("<H4>Hardware:</H4>");
          //client.println("<br />");  
          //client.print("<a href=\"http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardUnoArduino\">Arduino UNO</a>");
          client.println("Arduino UNO");
          client.println("<br />");
          client.println("Ethernet shield (includes SD card slot)");
          client.println("<br />");
          client.println("DHT11 temerature and humidity sensor (DFR0067)");
          client.println("<br />");
          client.println("DS1307 RTC (Sparkfun BOB-00099)");



          client.println("</BODY>");
          client.println("</HTML>");

          delay(1);
          //stopping client
          client.stop();


        }
      }
    }
  }
  
  checkSockStatus();
}

void checkSockStatus()
{
  unsigned long thisTime = millis();

  for (int i = 0; i < MAX_SOCK_NUM; i++) {
    uint8_t s = W5100.readSnSR(i);

    if(s == 0x17) {
      if(socketStat[i] == 0x14) {
        connectTime[i] = thisTime;
      }
      else if(socketStat[i] == 0x17) {
        if(thisTime - connectTime[i] > 30000UL) {
          Serial.print(F("\r\nSocket frozen: "));
          Serial.println(i);
          close(i);
        }
      }
    }
    else connectTime[i] = thisTime;

    socketStat[i] = W5100.readSnSR(i);
  }
}
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 30, 2014, 06:57 pm
So I need a router or have to run through my PC which has my only open Ethernet port.
No problem, I have other toys I haven't played with for now.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Henry_Best on Dec 01, 2014, 06:17 am
Tried accessing your URL from work and got (xxx replaces company name to protect the innocent)...This could be an over active filter or maybe something else...
Accessed OK by Chrome with Avast! AV.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Dec 03, 2014, 07:16 pm
Adafruit Trinket from a few posts above, installed and tested. Bit of a mission to sort, but followed their instructions here (https://learn.adafruit.com/introducing-trinket) and all good. Also tested Uno again afterwards to make sure the new avrdude.conf and the ld file didn't break anything.

It as a tiny red led onboard which I suspect is visible from the Moon, it's so bright. Def going to need a tiny piece of paper stuck on top. Or paint. Blinding.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Henry_Best on Dec 05, 2014, 05:45 am
Adafruit Trinket from a few posts above, installed and tested. Bit of a mission to sort, but followed their instructions here (https://learn.adafruit.com/introducing-trinket) and all good. Also tested Uno again afterwards to make sure the new avrdude.conf and the ld file didn't break anything.

It as a tiny red led onboard which I suspect is visible from the Moon, it's so bright. Def going to need a tiny piece of paper stuck on top. Or paint. Blinding.
You could lend it to the military, to use as a searchlight.  :) 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Dec 06, 2014, 11:37 am
One of these (http://www.adafruit.com/product/1096) wireless receivers from Adafruit, with a 4-button keyfob.

edit: and a 5V 400mA solar panel. Got it hooked up to the above receiver as its supply, couple of leds, transmitter gets the leds on-ing and off-ing as advertised.

Next is to get the transmitter pins hooked up to my recently purchased Trinket, have the Trinket doing summat based on the pins. I'm thinking the solar panel should be able to drive the Trinket and the receiver and a couple of leds.

All good fun on a nice sunny Southern Hemisphere summer's afternoon.

(You can see Johannesburg daytime sky in almost real-time (60 sec delay max) here (http://www.henleyair.co.za/henleycam_north.htm).)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Mar 28, 2015, 02:03 am
Received my Rigol DS1054Z oscilloscope this week, after waiting about 3 months for it (it's the absolute best seller at the moment because of it's hackability and low price).
New toy to spend a lot of time, learning how to use all the possibilities of it.

Also just ordered a capacitance / ESR tester to find failing capacitors (or ones that are about to fail) before they actually pop.
Don't know how good that one will be, it's a cheap looking Chinese device which has started its journey across the world today.

About time to reshuffle the workbench before more stuff comes in.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 28, 2015, 04:43 am
Got a shipment of SMD LEDs from eBay.

Also some SMD resistors.

Tiny little things (compare to a grain of uncooked long-grain rice):

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/P1080927.JPG)

Made up a little "LED board" to use when you just want to light an LED when testing something. Underneath, between the pins and the LEDs are 300 ohm SMD resistors, same size as in the photo above.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/P1080929.JPG)

There are five colours, twice. (white, red, green, blue, yellow). The label above the pins indicates which colours are which.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Mar 28, 2015, 11:19 am
Watch the power dissipation in those tiny resistors.   20mA for an LED through a 300 ohm resistor is about 1/8W, but a standard 0603 resistor is only 1/10W.  (although 20mA for an SMT LED is "a lot" these days.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Mar 28, 2015, 11:19 am
I ordered some of the new TI MSP432 LaunchPads.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Mar 28, 2015, 10:07 pm
I ordered one of these for my old eyes
Supposed to have 420 mm focal length
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Dental-Surgical-Medical-3-5X-Binocular-Loupes-Glasses-Magnifier-420mm-Dentist-/310621490996?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item48527bcf34 (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Dental-Surgical-Medical-3-5X-Binocular-Loupes-Glasses-Magnifier-420mm-Dentist-/310621490996?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item48527bcf34)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 29, 2015, 04:01 am
Watch the power dissipation in those tiny resistors.   20mA for an LED through a 300 ohm resistor is about 1/8W, but a standard 0603 resistor is only 1/10W.  (although 20mA for an SMT LED is "a lot" these days.)

I measured a forward voltage of 1.8V, so therefore the current would be:

Code: [Select]

 (5 - 1.8) / 300 = 0.011 A


Dropping 3.2V with 0.011 A would use:

Code: [Select]

 0.011 * 3.2 = 0.0352 W


Since 1/10 of a watt is 0.1 W then that would be well in spec.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Mar 29, 2015, 07:15 am
I ordered one of these for my old eyes
Supposed to have 420 mm focal length
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Dental-Surgical-Medical-3-5X-Binocular-Loupes-Glasses-Magnifier-420mm-Dentist-/310621490996?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item48527bcf34 (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Dental-Surgical-Medical-3-5X-Binocular-Loupes-Glasses-Magnifier-420mm-Dentist-/310621490996?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_2&hash=item48527bcf34)
I've been wanting something like that for ages. But does it come attached to glasses? I wear them, but would need to have the loupé on my glasses, not some supplied ones.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Mar 29, 2015, 04:12 pm
Loupes:
As soon as I get back from a trip I'll let you know how they attach, and will show pictures.
These also come with a lithium battery and a detachable head LED lamp assembly.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Apr 06, 2015, 02:32 am
I've been wanting something like that for ages. But does it come attached to glasses? I wear them, but would need to have the loupé on my glasses, not some supplied ones.
Just came across this (http://www.dx.com/p/glasses-type-20x-magnifier-with-white-led-light-2-x-cr1620-116296#.VSHRx5OM5aQ), and thought about this thread.
How about those ?
They clip on a frame, i suppose they could be clipped on your existing glasses (i'm not sure about that, but hey for that price..).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Apr 06, 2015, 02:40 am
I believe the focal length of those magnifiers are quite short.

The ones I have ordered are supposed to be 420mm.
Hope they arrive soon.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Apr 06, 2015, 02:52 am
Quote from: Customer Review
The focus point is about 10 mm from the lenses
That customer also stated "In useful product".
If you have a look at the pictures, you see that these guys are putting the objects to view almost in their eyes.

So i guess you are right about that, LarryD.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Apr 06, 2015, 03:21 am
I ordered some of the new TI MSP432 LaunchPads.
They arrived (and seem to work.)  I'm a bit disappointed that the msp432 Energia support is ONLY via the TI-RTOS kernel.  I'm a bit disappointed the the Energia ARM support (which I haven't looked at extensively) seems to use newlib rather than newlib-nano (though, perhaps not the 432, since it uses TI-RTOS?  More research needed.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wzaggle on Apr 07, 2015, 05:11 pm
Pinoccio and Lead Scout just to play around with.   https://pinocc.io/
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Apr 11, 2015, 11:08 am
Treated myself to a decent Bosch cordless toy um, I mean power drill (http://www.bosch-professional.com/za/en/gsb-18-2-li-33639-ocs-p/).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 11, 2015, 09:53 pm
4 x PL2303HX USB-TTL converters, work with Win 7 and probably Linux.

20 x 74HC4050 Logic Hex Buffers -- multiple protected voltage levelers in each one.

50 x 2N7000 Logic Level N-Channel 60V/200mA MOSFETs -- cheap at that quantity.

And some hardware bits, heatsink grease and soldering iron wipe off sponges.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Apr 12, 2015, 02:33 am
I got my magnifying loupes.
You get everything seen in the first image.
It feels like you are looking down a tunnel but, the 400mm focal length and 3.5X is not too bad.
Nice high intensity LED head lamp.
A bit heavy on the nose.
You could reattach to a prescription pair of glasses but I don't think you would reap any benefits in doing so.

(http://i.imgur.com/TGxzjud.jpg]http://i.imgur.com/TGxzjud.jpg)


I WILL NOT be throwing out my $5.00 3.5X visor that I use for soldering.
They give you more peripheral view.

(http://i.imgur.com/OMYK4DU.jpg]http://i.imgur.com/OMYK4DU.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Apr 12, 2015, 02:53 am
So if you wear glasses, like I do, you are saying you would just adjust the loupe to compensate?

Can you re-post the link to where you got it please?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Apr 12, 2015, 03:50 am
Here is where I ordered the loupe magnifiers from:

http://www.ebay.ca/itm/190777047568?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649 (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/190777047568?ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1439.l2649)

The charger for the battery has the same plug we use in Canada.

(http://images.meredith.com/diy/images/2009/03/p_SCW_105_06.jpg)

The only adjustment you can make is eye piece rotation (silver knobs) and eye distance (center white knob).
No focusing, moving your hands does that.
I wear glasses for astigmatism and don't seem to have problems not wear my glasses with these loupes.
I would say these are similar to look through binoculars.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Apr 12, 2015, 04:29 am
Thanks!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Apr 24, 2015, 11:02 pm
Latest is an Azpen 7" tablet that I'm just learning to use.
Never had a tablet before. 
The touchkeys ... made for smaller fingers.
And this post is from it.

PS -- from a real PC with real keyboard :o)

Also in from Yourduino; a $6 Nano, 10 555's, 10 RS485 chips and 5 IR receivers.
The shipping does come to a good fraction of the cost but IMO the support pages make up for it.
Really, like Sparkfun and LadyAda, Yourduino has good professional support.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wzaggle on May 08, 2015, 07:34 pm
This one sounded too good to pass up. 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1598272670/chip-the-worlds-first-9-computer (https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/1598272670/chip-the-worlds-first-9-computer)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on May 08, 2015, 08:23 pm
Not so close to $9 when you add in enough extra to make it really usable it seems.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: wzaggle on May 08, 2015, 08:39 pm
Yes, $10 more for a VGA port, $15 more for a BT keyboard/pad and then PS, Case, etc.  But still looked like fun just to see if they can actually complete the project by this time next year.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 08, 2015, 11:19 pm
Sounds like a cheaper version of the Raspberry Pi.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Isaac96 on May 12, 2015, 04:01 pm
2 ATTINY 4313
1 ATMEGA 328-PU
1 LM2576
1 inductor
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 13, 2015, 06:46 am
Some 8x8 dot-matrix LED displays pre-assembled with 4 LED modules per board for $US 8.50 each, from eBay.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/P1090031.JPG)

I wrote a library to simplify outputting to these gadgets, details at Interfacing LED displays with the MAX7219 driver (http://www.gammon.com.au/forum/?id=11516)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on May 15, 2015, 04:20 pm
Hi,

Bought one of these on ebay auction, $6.00

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/MAX31855-Module-K-Type-Thermocouple-Thermocouple-Sensor-for-Arduino-UNO-Mega-/351214688957?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_3&hash=item51c606dabd

Going to play with it, and check calibration on a calibrator

Just connecting it up and running some code it was unstable and way out in cal. 

Will post a thread when I've got some time on the weekend.

Tom..... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Isaac96 on May 16, 2015, 12:38 am
My stuff arrived! :D  :D  :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on May 16, 2015, 01:11 am
Lots of fun with your stuff then.

I just ordered some assistance:
(https://cdn-reichelt.de/bilder/web/artikel_ws/D300/LLZD6015-8LED.jpg)

Magnifying glass with 90 LEDs.
I know it helps, because i've got one at work already.
A bit sad because i need it, but will be happy when it arrives hopefully sometime next week.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on May 16, 2015, 01:20 am
Hi,
MAS3 I have one at work too, nice and light and good magnification.
Does that one have the small extra magnifier in it so our poor eyes can read the ever decreasing size of laser written part numbers?
The old unit we had at work was heavy and used the donut flouro tube, I grabbed it cos the mechanics is still good, going to strip the old electrics out and fit LEDs.

Tom.... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on May 16, 2015, 02:06 am
No, this one doesn't have that extra.
I'm afraid that would always be in a spot where it is unwanted.
So if i would need some extra magnification, i have a set of lenses for my camera within an arms length.
I can always hold an extra one in front of this one.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on May 19, 2015, 05:51 am
I bought a few of these.  I highly recommend them and downloading u8glib which works with this display really well.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/181325476747 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/181325476747)
https://code.google.com/p/u8glib/ (https://code.google.com/p/u8glib/)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=126453)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on May 19, 2015, 06:02 am
I bought a few of these.
Confusing description though: "OLED LCD"
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on May 19, 2015, 06:15 am
@JoeN

Do you have a example sketch for the OLED?
And maybe some images of displays you have come up with?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on May 19, 2015, 06:20 am
Confusing description though: "OLED LCD"
It's worse than that on the eBay page:

Quote
OLED LCD LED Display Module for Arduino
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on May 20, 2015, 06:03 am
@JoeN

Do you have a example sketch for the OLED?
And maybe some images of displays you have come up with?
1.  Download u8glib into Libraries of your Arduino software.
2.  Restart Arduino.
3.  Open sketch u8glib>GraphicsTest.ino

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=126612)

4.  Uncomment line //U8GLIB_SH1106_128X64 u8g(U8G_I2C_OPT_DEV_0|U8G_I2C_OPT_FAST); to instantiate the library to communicate to this specific display.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=126614)

5.  Put display on I2C lines.  Only two lines are needed.  The board already has pullup resistors on both lines so you don't need to add those yourself.
6.  Program Arduino.

Note, this is not an Arduino but it is compatible, obviously, as far as this sketch goes.  I used an ISP programmer.  Results:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=126608)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=126610)

This sketch about a half dozen or so test screens, some are animated, all look great.  The other example sketches included with u8glib work also.

I'm running it on 3.3V here because I needed to verify it works well with 3.3V because I am going to use it on a different 3.3V project. They say it works on 5V fine also.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on May 20, 2015, 06:33 am
@JoeN
Your board kinda looks like an UNO rev 0.1

Thanks.
I will have to get a few of those displays.

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on May 20, 2015, 06:44 am
I can't help but wonder why that display is 1/4 of the price of adafruit's (https://www.adafruit.com/products/931)...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on May 20, 2015, 07:29 am
I can't help but wonder why that display is 1/4 of the price of adafruit's (https://www.adafruit.com/products/931)...
This is the comparable product display:

https://www.adafruit.com/products/326 (https://www.adafruit.com/products/326)

This one has the SPI pins broken out.  Apparently, the underlying driver IC can either be I2C or SPI, it all depends on which pins the board maker routes onto the board.

Well, for one thing it seems to me that it is based on the SH1106, not the SSD1306 as the Adafruit says it is based on.  These are similar but not identical driver ICs.  I don't know if this would affect the price.  I tried it with the Adafruit libraries at first and had trouble so that is why I went with the u8glib, it specifically supports SH1106 as well as SSD1306, as well as a huge number of other driver ICs.  I bought three displays and they all work and all work equally as well, no difference of brightness or anything.  They seem reasonably well assembled.

Overall, the question can be asked about a lot of things:

http://www.adafruit.com/products/302 (http://www.adafruit.com/products/302)
http://www.ebay.com/itm/100PCS-Tri-Color-5mm-4-pin-RGB-Diffused-Common-Anode-Light-Emitting-Diode-LEDs-/111427884493 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/100PCS-Tri-Color-5mm-4-pin-RGB-Diffused-Common-Anode-Light-Emitting-Diode-LEDs-/111427884493)

Adafruit is great, but I wouldn't say they have the greatest prices.  The rent in NYC is too damn high!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on May 20, 2015, 07:35 am
The rent in NYC is too damn high!
Not that I know the USA at all, I have actually wondered why they need prime positioning for an online business. Maybe there's a good coffee shop on the corner.... I'm sure Pololu pays a lot less here (https://www.pololu.com/blog/28/ten-years-in-las-vegas).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on May 20, 2015, 08:12 am
Not that I know the USA at all, I have actually wondered why they need prime positioning for an online business. Maybe there's a good coffee shop on the corner.... I'm sure Pololu pays a lot less here (https://www.pololu.com/blog/28/ten-years-in-las-vegas).
I know the US very well and I have wondered myself.  It's great to have access to talent, but high tech talent is available in less expensive places than downtown Manhattan.  I wonder what the commute is for most of their workers.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on May 20, 2015, 08:58 am
I wonder what the commute is for most of their workers.
Well lit...

(https://learn.adafruit.com/system/guides/images/000/000/654/medium800/skate-loop.gif?1405443464)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on May 20, 2015, 09:05 am
I thought everyone lived in Manhattan anyway, or is that just what I see on Friends and HIMYM?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on May 20, 2015, 02:53 pm
Skate boarding at night is a good thing to do?   :smiley-slim:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jun 01, 2015, 07:23 am
Scientific Calculator:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/P1090055.JPG)

And ... get this! It's portable!

Cost: $1.99 (Australian dollars).

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Jun 01, 2015, 07:40 am
Had to sample what Ebay had to offer.

(http://i.imgur.com/foWG0uE.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jun 01, 2015, 03:25 pm
Hi,

Quote
Cost: $1.99 (Australian dollars).
Nick, lucky we don't have carbon tax, it isn't solar powered, would have cost you more than 1.99.

Buy a new one when the batteries run out.

Tom.... :)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 10, 2015, 08:20 am
Just ordered H&H's TAoE v3....

(Ostensibly for my daughter....)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Jun 10, 2015, 09:37 am
I've ordered a bunch of ATtinys...
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jun 10, 2015, 01:21 pm
Hi,
Just got delivered 10 of the nRF24L01 tx/rx units, been having a good time setting them up, going to try and get a network of them running on the weekend.


Also got the sparkfun ODB canbus board earlier this week, have it setup as a monitor at the moment. 


https://www.sparkfun.com/products/10039



Works well, just deciding on a decent display.
Of all the LCD 16x2 and 16x4, I don't have an I2C type. Must look on good old ebay.

Tom.... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Jun 11, 2015, 04:07 am
(Oh yeah.  Also some of DrAzzy's PCBs (https://www.tindie.com/stores/DrAzzy/) to put the Attiny chips on.)
(and some NCP LPCXpresso boards, so as to qualify for cheap shipping.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jun 12, 2015, 08:26 am
DigiSpark board: $US 2.30.

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/P1090058.JPG)

This uses the "virtual USB" concept to make a USB interface out of a simple ATtiny85 chip, hence the cheap price.

So, you only have 8kB of program memory, some of which is dedicated to the bootloader, however there seems to be 6000 bytes over for your code. A simple keyboard emulator shows that it uses almost half the available memory.

Code: [Select]

Sketch uses 2,828 bytes (47%) of program storage space. Maximum is 6,012 bytes.


Still, could be useful for a cheap keyboard dongle or something like that.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jun 27, 2015, 06:11 am
Just ordered H&H's TAoE v3....
Hopefully not too long to wait now.... they said by the end of the month
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JimboZA on Jul 02, 2015, 05:43 pm
And TAoEv3 arrived today.... some light reading....
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Jul 12, 2015, 05:44 am
I am thinking of getting one of these, any one out there have one yet:
http://www.sandisk.com/products/mobile-flash-drives/ixpand/ (http://www.sandisk.com/products/mobile-flash-drives/ixpand/)


(http://www.stockpilingmoms.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/iXpand-Final.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on Jul 12, 2015, 07:56 am
Ooh, nice nails!


What will you do with it? I don't need to move that much data between devices, like PCs or something. Already have 64GB card in my smartphone. Also have 64GB USB sticks laying around that aren't used much.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Jul 12, 2015, 06:51 pm
Ooh, nice nails!   :-*


Images/videos only, with iPad.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Aug 21, 2015, 03:49 am
ITEAD Due and Maple.  They were on sale; Till now I had been resisting Due as "too expensive for power I don't expect to need or use."
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Aug 24, 2015, 10:41 am
Vintage purchase. So I picked up a - second hand - laptop and now the Science wonders if anyone has taken it from a sci-fi convention of archived BBS porn from the very late 90's and before. Found more than 400 Mbyte of vintage porn on the hard drive.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Henry_Best on Aug 26, 2015, 06:29 am
Vintage purchase. So I picked up a - second hand - laptop and now the Science wonders if anyone has taken it from a sci-fi convention of archived BBS porn from the very late 90's and before. Found more than 400 Mbyte of vintage porn on the hard drive.
Remember that the young women in that porn are now in their 50s!!!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: 3dprinter on Sep 03, 2015, 11:32 pm
Latest purchase: Tickets and accomodation in Rome. Around the 16-18th October

8)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Sep 06, 2015, 08:45 am
Some stuff called Easy Alloy, a paste-solder cheap knock off of ChipQwik.  I wanted to see if it really is easy to remove the ATmega328P from a Nano.  It was easy and kind of fun.
(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/ODAwWDgwMA==/z/gNEAAOxydlFSolen/$_57.JPG)
Next I plan to drag solder the ATmega328P back onto the Nano, will be my first attempt at drag soldering. 

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Erni on Sep 06, 2015, 06:38 pm
I just received a emw3265

http://www.wifimcu.com/en.html

Kind of bigbrother to esp8266
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 15, 2015, 04:48 am
New calculator:

(http://www.gammon.com.au/images/Arduino/P1100127.JPG)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Sep 15, 2015, 05:15 am
Did you get it from here  :)


Abacus (http://www.abacuscalculators.com.au)


Weedpharma 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on Sep 15, 2015, 05:19 am
Must be old - looks like the Black & White version, not even in Color 8)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 15, 2015, 05:40 am
Did you get it from here  :)

Abacus (http://www.abacuscalculators.com.au)
No, but good guess!

At least I don't have to worry about replacing the batteries. And, note that it is a 13-digit calculator. So that's pretty top-of-the range, really.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Sep 15, 2015, 06:26 am
Does that use I2C or SPI?   :o
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 15, 2015, 07:32 am
Well, some videos I've seen have suggested using finger and thumb at the same time, so I guess you could say parallel interface, but so far I've been doing one bit at a time, so that's serial, I guess. :P

It has a Reset button - see photo, on the top near the left. That's handy.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Henry_Best on Sep 16, 2015, 05:02 am
Looks like it's 5 bits wide. Was it designed by Baudot?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Sep 16, 2015, 05:07 am
What are your plans to interface it with an Arduino?

I can see a pile of reflective sensors to read position of counters and many servos to move them.

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 16, 2015, 07:36 am
I suppose I could hook up some solenoids. ;)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Henry_Best on Sep 17, 2015, 02:46 am
I suppose I could hook up some solenoids. ;)
Wouldn't that somewhat defeat the advantage of using no batteries?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 17, 2015, 07:09 am
Oh well, train up some monkeys, then. :P
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Sep 17, 2015, 08:41 am
Hey Nick, here they are standard on cribs and matrimonial beds ;)


(http://i.imgur.com/u3YmSKw.jpg)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Sep 17, 2015, 09:15 am
I bought mine cheap and it isn't bootloaded!   Not in sync!   Help!
(http://i01.i.aliimg.com/img/pb/032/513/493/493513032_571.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Sep 17, 2015, 10:48 am
Ah yes, well you just need to amfruct the baterpomp, the gillic frens.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Sep 17, 2015, 06:58 pm
That's easy if you have done it before.

.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dannable on Sep 17, 2015, 09:59 pm
200 x 1/8 carbon film resistors. Nothing odd about that you may think. But they were loose... not on paper tape. I don't think I've ever had resistors loose before - ah, maybe once back in the mid 1970's I got a box of 100.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: CrossRoads on Sep 17, 2015, 10:16 pm
I got a bag of 1000 1Ks, another of 1000 10Ks, and another of 0.1uF ceramic caps. Seemed like I never had enough when I wanted some, so I went for the bulk buy. Really cheap too,  like a penny each or less. Each whole bag fits in a closed fist easy.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Sep 18, 2015, 05:28 am
We have just bought a two year old Camry Hybrid. The most luxury we have ever had! It has a few more features than my 5yo Hilux! The technology is going to take a while to work out....then I have to teach the missus!

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Sep 18, 2015, 07:14 am
Wire Stripper

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=138242)
.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: ChrisTenone on Sep 18, 2015, 08:34 am
Wire Stripper
...
That is an interesting looking tool! I have never seen one like that. How do you like it?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Sep 18, 2015, 06:47 pm
They work great.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=138289)
.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: vffgaston on Sep 18, 2015, 06:49 pm
What is it for?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Sep 18, 2015, 07:41 pm
They've been around for at least 35 years - they're ideal for wire-wrap wire, which is hard to strip by other means.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: vffgaston on Sep 18, 2015, 07:47 pm
OK. Thanks.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Sep 18, 2015, 10:05 pm
I am using it to strip 22-26 stranded hookup wire.
No nicks or cutting of the individual conductors.

As AWOL says around for a long time.

Tool on the right is a stripper and wrapping tool.
.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Sep 19, 2015, 06:24 am
Wire wrap - another bygone technology!

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Sep 19, 2015, 06:33 am
I've made pretty big projects with wire wrapping.  It is fun, but expensive as hell.  The projects can end up looking pretty cool, or pretty damned bad.  But the connections are extremely good.   Unwrapping because you want to recover expensive sockets is unfun, but the other end of the tool does get that job done.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: ChrisTenone on Sep 21, 2015, 09:26 am
On Friday I got a Chronodot™ and a couple of those "memory backup" supercaps. I didn't know Chronodots came with a lithium battery (which they claim will last about a decade), so I need to come up with something for the caps.

I'm using the 'dot in a clock for the littleBits world:

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/s5z58lpqq1okmug/chronodotInCircuit.jpg)

While the caps bide their time:

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/8qii52coh74eify/oneFaradCaps.jpg)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: retrolefty on Sep 21, 2015, 03:03 pm
Wire wrap - another bygone technology!

Weedpharma
Ah, but for those of us that got to enjoy this tech it will always have a place in our existence. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Sep 27, 2015, 05:47 pm
(http://www.tinyosshop.com/image/data/ARDUINO/pro%20mini%20details2.jpg)

I purchased a couple of the TinySine 5.0V/3.3V-switchable 16MHz Pro Minis.   They are very thin and nice, and I don't mind the layout of A4-A7.   

Usually I just overclock and run at 16MHz and 3.3V.  The 16MHz ones give flexibility because it is pretty easy to run them at 8MHz by switching them with software when I want to.  Modify Optiboot by adding a couple of lines of code to divide the clock in half at the beginning of the code, right before the Adaboot no-wait mod.
Code: [Select]

  CLKPR = (1 << CLKPCE);
  CLKPR = 0x01;

Then compile Optiboot with the option AVR_FREQ=8000000L with 57600 baud.  When I want to run them at 5V/16MHz again, change the solder jumper and burn the standard bootloader or Uno bootloader. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Sep 28, 2015, 04:24 pm
How much, and web link?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Sep 28, 2015, 09:19 pm
http://r.ebay.com/lStzdW (http://r.ebay.com/lStzdW)
Mine were $2.25 USD with free shipping, but I see the seller has changed the listing to be $2.00 +$2.00 shipping. 

If you search for "enhancement pro mini 3.3/5.0" you will see a number of listings. 

TinySine also has a website where they are available:
http://www.tinyosshop.com (http://www.tinyosshop.com)

If you get the 16 MHz one, you would be able to switch it down to 8 MHz using software like I described. But if you buy the 8 MHz one, you can't switch it up to 16 MHz without putting a 16 MHz resonator on it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Sep 28, 2015, 11:24 pm
Thank you
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AlxDroidDev on Sep 29, 2015, 01:40 pm
I finally got an oscilloscope! It's a simple one, but at least it will of huge help.

Keysight DSO1072B (2 channel, 70MHz). Equivalent to US$ 270 new in box, on Farnell Newark in Brazil. Farnell is ending part of their operation in Brazil, so they are having huge sales.

(https://www.getrotech.com.br/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/600x600/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/d/s/dso1072b.jpg)

I also got 2 Fluke DMMs: a Fluke 117 (about US$ 147) and the Fluke 17B+ (about US$ 75). All of this was me giving myself presents for my birthday, which is this week.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 09, 2015, 09:02 pm
On order from dx.com;

3.2 inch TFT IPS 480 x 320 262K Color Full-Angle LCD Module for Arduino Mega2560 - Blue + Black

Quote
This module is 3.2 inch TFT LCD with 262K color 480 x 320 resolutions. The controller of this LCD module is HX8357B, it supports 16-wires DataBus interface. Moreover, this module includes 5V~3.3V power conversion circuit and Level conversion circuit; This Module can Directly inserted into the Arduino Mega2560 Board, it also includes the SD card socket and SPI FLASH circuit.

Features:

- Support Arduino Mega2560 Directly inserted;

- With Full-angle IPS TFT panel;

- OnBorad level conversion chip for 5V/3.3V MCU;

- Compatible with 3.3/5V operation voltage level;

- Compatible with Arduino-Series development Board;

- Compatible with UTFT / UTFT_Buttons /Utouch Library for Arduino.

- Provided 12-examples with Arduino, 3-examples with STM32;

- With SD Card Socket;

- With SPI FLASH circuit;
US$12.18 for 1 shipped! I went for 3 at $10.80 ea.



And maybe at last a decent cheap MP3 module, I ordered 5 at $5.58 ea. 1 is $6.32, still cheap.

 UART Control Serial MP3 Music Player Module for Arduino / AVR / ARM / PIC - Blue + Silver

Quote
The module is a kind of simple MP3 player device which is based on a high-quality MP3 audio chip---YX5300. It can support 8kHz ~ 48kHz sampling frequency MP3 and WAV file formats. There is a TF card socket on board, so you can plug the micro SD card that stores audio files. MCU can control the MP3 playback state by sending commands to the module via UART port, such as switch songs, change the volume and play mode and so on. You can also debug the module via USB to UART module. It is compatible with Arduino/AVR/ARM/PIC.


Features:

1.Support sampling frequency (kHz): 8 / 11.025 / 12 / 16 / 22.05 / 24 / 32 / 44.1 / 48

2.Support file format: MP3 / WAV

3.Support Micro SD card, Micro SDHC Card

4.30 class adjustable volume

5.UART TTL serial control playback mode, baud rate is 9600bps

6.Power supply can be 3.2 ~ 5.2VDC
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Oct 09, 2015, 10:17 pm
I finally got an oscilloscope! It's a simple one, but at least it will of huge help.
Your image (https://www.getrotech.com.br/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/600x600/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/d/s/dso1072b.jpg) is not loading for me. I just see a huge blank area in your post.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Oct 09, 2015, 10:43 pm
True for me too (didn't even realise there was supposed to be a picture there, even if there is this huge void).
Funny thing is however, if you do a Google image search for the model number and the seller, you will get a link to this very thread and page, and a very poor quality picture.
If you go to that site, following the next Google link, you'll get a 404 page (in English).
They don't seem to offer that product any more.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Henry_Best on Oct 10, 2015, 01:33 am
I found it on Farnell's UK site, here. (http://"http://uk.farnell.com/keysight-technologies/dso1072b/oscilloscope-2ch-70mhz-1gsps/dp/2094429?ost=Keysight+DSO1072B+(2+channel%2C+70MHz)")
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Oct 10, 2015, 08:08 am

Membership here...
https://dallasmakerspace.org/ (https://dallasmakerspace.org/)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AlxDroidDev on Oct 11, 2015, 04:53 am
Your image (https://www.getrotech.com.br/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/600x600/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/d/s/dso1072b.jpg) is not loading for me. I just see a huge blank area in your post.
Sorry about that.

This is the one I got: http://www.keysight.com/en/pd-2115426-pn-DSO1072B/oscilloscope-70-mhz-2-channel?cc=US&lc=eng (http://www.keysight.com/en/pd-2115426-pn-DSO1072B/oscilloscope-70-mhz-2-channel?cc=US&lc=eng)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Oct 11, 2015, 09:20 pm
A link to its picture would suffice.
However, Keysight doesn't seem to like pictures of their products popping up all over the 'net, so they make it hard to grab pictures like that from their site.
This is a picture i found from some shop that either made their own, or was able to pull it from Keysights' predecessor Agilent's site (if you take a closer look you will be able to recognise that blue logo instead of the present red logo).

(http://www.triotest.com.au/shop/2827-large_default/keysight-dso1072b-oscilloscope-70mhz-2-channel.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 25, 2015, 01:55 pm
Update: got the parts and found the libraries. They work without the complications other cheap parts have given me.

I haven't done thorough testing, enough to ensure myself they're functional by diddling with the demos.

There is a forum thread on the displays where it's posted that they do not have touchscreens.
I went for the UTFT library and got the wrong one first, but RinkyDink's site has the good one!
And oh yeah, the display lines look fine! Tiny text is clearly readable... for me, with a magnifier.

Only things: it needs a Mega, uses the pins my quadram card does and sits pretty close over all the pin holes but still room to bend jumper pins and get them in with some air to spare above.


On order from dx.com;

3.2 inch TFT IPS 480 x 320 262K Color Full-Angle LCD Module for Arduino Mega2560 - Blue + Black

US$12.18 for 1 shipped! I went for 3 at $10.80 ea.



And maybe at last a decent cheap MP3 module, I ordered 5 at $5.58 ea. 1 is $6.32, still cheap.

 UART Control Serial MP3 Music Player Module for Arduino / AVR / ARM / PIC - Blue + Silver

The displays are here.
http://www.dx.com/p/3-2-inch-tft-ips-480-x-320-262k-color-full-angle-lcd-module-for-arduino-mega2560-blue-black-369199#.Viybk13KOFQ

The library is here. I am sending this guy some Paypal!
http://www.rinkydinkelectronics.com/

The player. I bought 5 at the bulk price and these are looking to be what I've wanted for years now!
http://www.dx.com/p/uart-control-serial-mp3-music-player-module-for-arduino-avr-arm-pic-blue-silver-342439#.Viy0LF3KOFQ

The library and examples are in this zip:
https://sites.google.com/site/telectroniques/montages-en-vrac/yx5300/Serial%20MP3%20Player.zip
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Oct 25, 2015, 05:45 pm
Thanks for the links GoForSmoke for both display as library.

DX is my main source for my toys, so i'll have a look over there and check out that display.
Libraries can sometimes be hard to find for such products, as the seller generally has no idea about what they are actually selling (even though they do their best to support it).
But hey, at those prices you can take risks.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Oct 26, 2015, 04:15 am
Yeah, I've gone through a good bit of almost right. It's much safer buying things like resistors and chips.

I bought a bag of 10 5 mW red lasers on a try for $4.60 and they work at 5V though I still don't know the lifetime. I got some more anyway and the price was less already.

DX does not give enough information on a lot of their stuff and often I find misleading info as well.
I don't trust half the reviews either, I took a crap shoot on these to get near-eBay prices where on eBay there's that small extra chance it's a total ripoff.

I have a 5m reel of rgb led strip coming. It was $7.75. What are the chances that the leds are individually addressable through SPI? LOL, I'll find out next month!
I want to make some smallish infinity mirrors. If these are all the same color then... room lights!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Oct 31, 2015, 07:53 pm
DF Robot Beetle, a very small Leonardo
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=142306)

13 digital pins, 5 can be used as analog in.  D13 LED does not have a pad.
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=142308)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Nov 01, 2015, 02:27 pm
Edit: bad link removed.


Very nice.

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Nov 01, 2015, 08:54 pm
@weedpharma: your link doesn't work, this can't be correct:
http://www."http.com//www.dfrobot.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1075#.VjYSyHrCarU"
Seen some user reporting this recently, i don't know if that is a problem with the forum software or something else.


They are nice and small.
I've got a pair of them, just becuase i was curious when i saw them.
Haven't used then yet.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Nov 01, 2015, 09:26 pm
The forum strikes again! The text is correct. This works:

http://www.dfrobot.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1075#.VjYSyHrCarU (http://www.dfrobot.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1075#.VjYSyHrCarU)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 01, 2015, 09:40 pm
Nice price!

Are there clips that fit those pads?

I didn't know it has pwn pins! Projects spring to mind....

Quote
The new generation "Beetle" controller derives its core notion from minimalism without compromising functionality. It comes with Atmel AtMega32u4 (datasheet) @16MHz clock time and has expanded amounts of interfaces: 10 digital pins, 5 analog pins and 4 pwn pins.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Nov 01, 2015, 11:45 pm
Earrings for my wife this Christmas  :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Nov 01, 2015, 11:57 pm
Hmm.
I've been typing out the code tags for a while now, and i learned to test them before submitting the post.
So there must be some problem when one uses the URL button.
I've just now tested that button and it seems to work for me.
The user that complained before mentioned Chrome browser if i remember correct, i'm not using that.

Quote from: GoForSmoke
Are there clips that fit those pads?
There is a shield for this (http://www.dfrobot.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1120#.VjaWZivLNaQ).

Instead of plugging the shield on the 'beetle' board, the beetle gets plugged to the shield.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 02, 2015, 01:07 am
It only contacts the outer 8 pins including power and ground. That's a tight pin count.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Nov 02, 2015, 01:22 am
It is probably best used by soldering wires directly and/or using conductive thread.   Since it is a Leonardo, development and prototyping can be done with a Leonardo or Micro, then solder together the final project with the Beetle.   If I were inclined to prototype with the Beetle, I could make a custom breakout board with pogo pins.   
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 02, 2015, 01:42 am
I have a Teensy 3.1. I'd like to make a no-solder fixture for it to get at all those pads. Pogo-pins?

I have a bag of mini alligator clips. Solder a pin on one jaw, insulate clip suitably and that should clip those Beetle pads. Pin goes in the hole and the jaws clamp the pad.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Nov 02, 2015, 01:45 am
Along this line?
http://www.dfrobot.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=35&product_id=1307#.Vjax9rerTcd (http://www.dfrobot.com/index.php?route=product/product&path=35&product_id=1307#.Vjax9rerTcd)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Nov 02, 2015, 01:59 am
Yes, although I'm not sure if the type of pogo is important or not.   This Adafruit author has a favorite:
https://learn.adafruit.com/how-to-make-a-pogo-pin-test-jig/preparation (https://learn.adafruit.com/how-to-make-a-pogo-pin-test-jig/preparation)
I have on my wish list to get some P75-LM pins to try out.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Nov 02, 2015, 02:18 am
Earrings for my wife this Christmas  :)
Great idea!  Are you going to use gold solder or 60/40 when you attach the earring hooks to the DF Robot Beetles?  Where does the battery pack go?  On a necklace pendant?  Are you going to just use the blink sketch or something fancier?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Nov 02, 2015, 03:32 am
A 3.3V coin cell can run led(s) for a long time. Might be a lot to hang from an ear?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: MAS3 on Nov 02, 2015, 10:10 pm
How about a nice hat with a square foot solar panel on top ?
(need to consider the dark days around x-mas).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Nov 02, 2015, 10:23 pm
(need to consider the dark days around x-mas).
What dark days? I'm expecting Xmas to be very hot and sunny, if October is any guideline.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Nov 03, 2015, 02:14 am
Xmas is typically mid 30's C for me. Daylight from 0530 to 1900. Should be enough to drive the beast!

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Nov 03, 2015, 02:46 am
Xmas is typically mid -30's C for me. Daylight from 08:36 to 16:30. Should NOT be enough to drive the beast!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Nov 03, 2015, 02:50 am
Hi

You think you have it bad..

Luxury. We used to have to get out of the lake at three o'clock in the morning, clean the lake, eat a handful of hot gravel, go to work at the mill every day for tuppence a month, come home, and Dad would beat us around the head and neck with a broken bottle, if we were LUCKY!+
Classic.




Tom...Likewise long summer  el nino..... 8)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Nov 03, 2015, 08:07 am
Tom, try telling that to the kids. They won't believe ya.

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Nov 17, 2015, 07:02 pm
Just bought Megunolink Pro, serial data visualization and control software.
http://www.megunolink.com/ (http://www.megunolink.com/)

Coupon TROMLP for 30% off. (~ $21.00 USD)
http://tronixstuff.com/category/megunolink/ (http://tronixstuff.com/category/megunolink/)

I like the MLP UI Message Processor Library.
http://www.megunolink.com/documentation/interface-panel/mlp-ui-message-processor-library/ (http://www.megunolink.com/documentation/interface-panel/mlp-ui-message-processor-library/)

It would be nice if they offered a PDF manual and a few more examples (I guess that's what winter time is for).

Works as advertised.
It will be a great addition to my software tools.
.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Henry_Best on Nov 18, 2015, 02:26 am
Just bought Megunolink Pro, serial data visualization and control software.
http://www.megunolink.com/ (http://www.megunolink.com/)

Coupon TROMLP for 30% off. (~ $21.00 USD)
http://tronixstuff.com/category/megunolink/ (http://tronixstuff.com/category/megunolink/)

I like the MLP UI Message Processor Library.
http://www.megunolink.com/documentation/interface-panel/mlp-ui-message-processor-library/ (http://www.megunolink.com/documentation/interface-panel/mlp-ui-message-processor-library/)

It would be nice if they offered a PDF manual and a few more examples (I guess that's what winter time is for).

Works as advertised.
It will be a great addition to my software tools.
Looks good, but their forum is useless. A query sent in October 2014 wasn't answered until January 2015, nearly 3 months later!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Nov 18, 2015, 07:02 am
Looks good, but their forum is useless. A query sent in October 2014 wasn't answered until January 2015, nearly 3 months later!
And some of our members start bumping after a few hours!!

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Nov 18, 2015, 09:07 am
And some of our members start bumping after a few hours!!

Weedpharma
All forums are equal, but some forums are more equal than others.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Nov 18, 2015, 05:03 pm
The ESM has some of the same features.
http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=185740.0 (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=185740.0)

Two days now and I have to say I am very impressed with the MegunoLink Pro software.
Now my wife says this is my stocking suffer.  :smiley-slim:

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=144227)

Code: (Display an Arduino Variable in a PC Table) [Select]
   
    //example: Name                Value     Description
    //         CurrentPosition     1645      Current Value
    //the name you want displayed i.e. "CurrentPosition"
    Serial.print(F("{TABLE|SET|CurrentPosition|"));
    //the variable displayed ex: 1645
    Serial.print(Progress);
    //the description you want displayed, if any i.e. "Current Value" 
    Serial.println(F("|Current Value}"));


Windows can be docked or floating.

Edit: BTW:
- you can disable DTR  when the monitor connects, therefore the Arduino doesn't reset.
- there is a manual reset command button if you want to reset the Arduino from the PC Communications Manager screen.

Also, uploading a sketch to an UNO  automatically disconnects then reconnects the MegunoLink serial monitor once the sketch is uploaded.
.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Nov 22, 2015, 06:39 pm
+-12 DC to DC SMPS
http://www.ebay.ca/itm/201413161834 (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/201413161834)

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=144629)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Benji on Jan 06, 2016, 09:40 pm
Did people stop buying stuff?
I had a long pause in tinkering to tend to family and other hobbies, but restarted playing with circuits and Arduino.
Ordered some stuff for my (now dusty) robot, like a Mega board and a whole lot of random stuff from China for some long overdue projects.
-stepped drivers
-various nano boards to build into stuff (how can they build a Nano clone for less than a dip 328 chip?)
-extra breadboard
-Bluetooth modules (because Bluetooth)
-loads of parts that I ran out of while fixing stuff around the house

Got a long wish list for many projects that popped into my mind, but that is for later
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jan 07, 2016, 10:18 am
Put in an order for 10 of these.  I want to do some AC control via a microcontroller and need a DC rail integrated with the project for the digital section but want it integrated rather than a wall wart.  This looks like a really slick solution.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=149719)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Jan 07, 2016, 10:23 am
As there is no isolation, this must be used as though the entire circuit is live. What happens if active lead is connected to the lower rail and you touch it and earth? I hope your RCD safety switch works!

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Jan 07, 2016, 12:36 pm
MSP432 Launchpad special deal for $4.32 (I got three, since otherwise the $7 min postage was depressing.)
http://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/msp430blog/archive/2016/01/01/new-year-s-deal-msp432-launchpad-for-4-32 (http://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/msp430blog/archive/2016/01/01/new-year-s-deal-msp432-launchpad-for-4-32)

MSP432 is sort-of an ARM core with MSP430-style peripherals.

         onboard debugger support.
         Supported by Arduino-like Energia, with multitasking using TI-RTOS (about which I have mixed feelings.)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 07, 2016, 02:46 pm
MSP432 Launchpad
got one
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 07, 2016, 05:36 pm
The main "problem" with this was that the Energia support su**ed in TI-RTOS for multitasking support, "complicating" things and I have little patience to spend learning a vendor-specific RTOS.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jan 08, 2016, 01:46 am
As there is no isolation, this must be used as though the entire circuit is live. What happens if active lead is connected to the lower rail and you touch it and earth? I hope your RCD safety switch works!

Weedpharma
I understand what is going on here.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Jan 08, 2016, 02:25 am
Quote
... Energia support su**ed in TI-RTOS ...
gee, that sounds familiar :-)
"sucked" in this case was a physical description (as in "pulled"), not a value judgement.  But it got censored?!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Coding Badly on Jan 08, 2016, 05:11 am
But it got censored?!
If the post had been modified (censored) something like this would be displayed...

Quote
Today at 03:18 am Last Edit: Today at 03:18 am by JoeN
The word made it into your post so...

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 08, 2016, 05:30 am
Not exactly a new purchase, but I came across my old Amstrad computer while tidying up.

(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=149836)

Notice the cassette-tape I/O interface. 64 KB of RAM, built-in Basic and keyboard. You plug a TV monitor into the back.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Jan 08, 2016, 06:10 am
The keys aren't even soiled.  :o
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AlxDroidDev on Jan 10, 2016, 04:46 pm
2 Launchpad MSP432, for $4.32 each, directly from TI (using promo code 432@432, + $7 FEDEX shipping to Brazil):


(http://43oh.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/launchpad-msp432-2.jpg)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Ufoguy on Jan 10, 2016, 05:12 pm
Ordered a HC-05 bluetooth module for 5 $. Also a power bank 3.5 $.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: ChrisTenone on Jan 14, 2016, 08:14 am
I don't even know ...

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/9wfy2yglzrkgddg/girlboard.jpg)

It has a 32u4 and was two bucks. That's my explanation, and I'm sticking with it.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Benji on Jan 14, 2016, 02:11 pm
I don't even know ...

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/9wfy2yglzrkgddg/girlboard.jpg)

It has a 32u4 and was two bucks. That's my explanation, and I'm sticking with it.
It's different.... for sure.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 14, 2016, 08:27 pm
a super strong hard disk crusher
&& I am payed to destroy :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 15, 2016, 01:24 am
a super strong hard disk crusher
&& I am payed to destroy :D
They won't let you leave drives on the train tracks any more?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: tmd3 on Jan 15, 2016, 04:40 am
2 Launchpad MSP432, for $4.32 each ... using promo code 432@432 ...
Thanks for the alert, and the valid promotional code.  I got a couple of them, too.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: weedpharma on Jan 15, 2016, 09:43 am
a super strong hard disk crusher
&& I am payed to destroy :D
Years ago, I took a few old drives that I had to destroy down to my farm. I lined 3 drives deep and used a .44 Magnum on them. Took the remains back to work and told them I had used the Magnum method of data destruction.

Weedpharma
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jan 15, 2016, 01:40 pm
Hi,

Awwwwwww...
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/9wfy2yglzrkgddg/girlboard.jpg)

We all have to get in touch with our feminine side at some stage.


Tom..... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: GoForSmoke on Jan 15, 2016, 02:50 pm
Hi,

Awwwwwww...
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/9wfy2yglzrkgddg/girlboard.jpg)

We all have to get in touch with our feminine side at some stage.


Tom..... :)
From the DFRobot site:
Quote
In order to let everybody be able to use Arduinos on clothes conveniently, DFRobot partnered with KITIZE (a freelance design studio) and made this girl board,
I can just about hear the feminist poutrage. There will be TED talks and the UN will be alerted. Why to 'conflate' clothing with Girls proves sexist objectification and the hated patriarchy!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jan 15, 2016, 07:08 pm
(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/s/9wfy2yglzrkgddg/girlboard.jpg)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=150750)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: JoeN on Jan 16, 2016, 01:10 am
Years ago, I took a few old drives that I had to destroy down to my farm. I lined 3 drives deep and used a .44 Magnum on them. Took the remains back to work and told them I had used the Magnum method of data destruction.

Weedpharma
Actually, I saw a guy do this at a rifle range (after asking the range master).  He was using an HK-91 .308.  It was a  5.25 FH drive that crashed, back then this was like a $1500 drive ('93 or '94).  I think the ball rounds made it all the way through.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 16, 2016, 02:14 pm
I bought two travel packets:

Working Holiday Visa, Australia

looking for an employment there
&I'd like to meet Megan Kate Gale

Working Holiday Visa, California

Planning to meet Heather Locklear
she lives in Westwood, Los Angeles

* * * I collect postcards & autographs =P
only from the most beautiful girls and women ever
(including Kylie Minogue & Geri Halliwell, met in UK)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: nickgammon on Jan 17, 2016, 06:27 am
This thread is for discussing new purchases. I have moved discussion about the pros and cons of gun control to a new thread (http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=372552.0).

Please respect the feelings of other posters here. Subjects like guns, religion, politics, etc. can be touchy.

Any further posts about gun control in this thread will be deleted without comment.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 17, 2016, 03:45 pm
Televideo TS1603 '83
Green Phosphor, CRT
hacked as dumb term
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 17, 2016, 03:56 pm
Brand new USB 2.0 LS/FS/HS protocol analyzer
1200 USD, I am completed :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Jan 17, 2016, 09:19 pm
Raspberry Pi Zero (https://www.adafruit.com/products/2816) and Teensy-LC (https://www.pjrc.com/teensy/teensyLC.html)
(http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=91399.0;attach=150989)
The first and only ARM machines I have so far. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 17, 2016, 10:41 pm
Quote
The first and only ARM machines I have so far.
You don't have a mobile phone?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Jan 17, 2016, 10:59 pm
Oh, yeah, I forgot about that.
(https://charlespaolino.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/tin-can-11.jpg)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Jan 18, 2016, 12:01 am
Keep up with the times.
That's last years model.
.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 18, 2016, 10:16 am
bought a super fast PCI64 FiberChannel board with Optical interface
according with price list 2004, & including my TekXterm & Software
If you go by the original sticker price of everything on my Unix Box
I think it would top out somewhere in excess of 100K USD X_____X
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: Henry_Best on Jan 22, 2016, 07:21 am
Keep up with the times.
That's last years model.
This years model has bigger cans and a longer string.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: larryd on Jan 22, 2016, 08:36 am
This years model has bigger cans . . .
Are you saying you like bigger cans?    :smiley-eek-blue:
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 22, 2016, 12:53 pm
1. Meccanoid G15
2. HC SR04 ultrasonic sensor

Last year, I got the 86Duino One, which I am using now for my robot project. I am looking into giving the brain an upgrade.

http://www.amazon.com/DragonBoard-410c-Kit-Powered-AWS/dp/B01600X7IU (http://www.amazon.com/DragonBoard-410c-Kit-Powered-AWS/dp/B01600X7IU)

http://www.amazon.com/Raspberry-Pi-Model-Project-Board/dp/B00T2U7R7I (http://www.amazon.com/Raspberry-Pi-Model-Project-Board/dp/B00T2U7R7I)

http://www.amazon.com/Orange-1-6GHz-Android-Linux-Raspbian/dp/B014XB4ZHK/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1453463506&sr=1-1&keywords=orange+pi (http://www.amazon.com/Orange-1-6GHz-Android-Linux-Raspbian/dp/B014XB4ZHK/ref=sr_1_1?s=pc&ie=UTF8&qid=1453463506&sr=1-1&keywords=orange+pi)

These three look like some of my best options. I will be using the extra processing power for deep learning algorithms and machine vision.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 22, 2016, 01:52 pm
learning algorithms and machine vision.
why not to add an Asus Xtion ? :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 22, 2016, 02:33 pm
That thing is big, bulky, and expensive. I think this will suit my application just fine.

http://www.amazon.com/Pixy-CMUcam5-Smart-Vision-Sensor/dp/B00IUYUA80 (http://www.amazon.com/Pixy-CMUcam5-Smart-Vision-Sensor/dp/B00IUYUA80)

Of course, there still is the deep learning problem, but that takes care of the vision.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 22, 2016, 03:01 pm
Quote
That thing is big, bulky, and expensive.
But it provides depth information.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 22, 2016, 05:20 pm
My robot currently isn't large enough to support that much weight for a vision system. Another good alternative to the Asus Xtion is the Kinect, which is quite a bit cheaper and has similar features.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: TomGeorge on Jan 22, 2016, 06:33 pm
Hi,
We didn't have "ribbed" version in my day.
(https://charlespaolino.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/tin-can-11.jpg)
It is very easy to trace a call.

Tom..... :)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 22, 2016, 08:54 pm
My robot currently isn't large enough to support that much weight for a vision system
my robot is based on Epiphany3 (http://www.adapteva.com/epiphanyiii/)

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 22, 2016, 09:02 pm
That sounds like it has sufficient processing power. The only disadvantage is that is is 32-Bit and as a result supports less memory than say, for example, the DragonBoard 410c.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 22, 2016, 09:24 pm
Quote
The only disadvantage is that is is 32-Bit
Have you any conception of how much memory 4Gbyte is?

Quote
and as a result supports less memory than say, for example, the DragonBoard 410c.
Like the Snapdragon doesn't have enough problems of its own!

Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 22, 2016, 09:48 pm
the real trouble with Epiphany3 is the C language!
which actually sounds like The Byzantine Problem!

with hundred crores the C language is driving us out of control
Threads Cannot be Implemented as a Common Library
this because the C language really sucks about concurrency

I mean it don't offer a concurrency model as "language feature"
you need a trick to achieve the purpose, and this trick is often unsafe

A bit of hyperbole: the problem is the concurrency model of shared variable access.

The C language and its implementation offer no built-in tricks, no help at all.
Hell begins where you can smell the smoke, with the C language you are alone
while


so, with the C language, a better model for concurrency is probably using "channels"
which are also encouraged by most languages which support concurrency.
(including Concurrent Euclid)


I am programming my Epiphany3 board mixing ADA and C (with a BSP rewritten in assembly)
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 22, 2016, 09:59 pm
Quote
I am programming my Epiphany3 board mixing ADA and C
You'll get no sympathy from me
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 22, 2016, 10:00 pm
Don't all processors have problems of their own? Yes, I know, 4GB total memory (RAM + ROM) is plenty for most applications. However, when you use deep learning algorithms and add in machine vision on top of the "normal" robotic functions, the memory used becomes astronomical. Which is why getting a 64-Bit board isn't a bad option (so long as it is power-efficient).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 22, 2016, 10:09 pm
Quote
Don't all processors have problems of their own?
Yup, but have you tried keeping a Snapdragon going at full whack for more than about 100ms?
More cores, more thermal problems, more thermal problems, more throttling, more thottling, less performance.
Might as well have not bothered with all the extra cores.

big.LITTLE makes for great marketing copy, but real-world? Nah.

Quote
However, when you use deep learning algorithms and add in machine vision on top of the "normal" robotic functions, the memory used becomes astronomical.
You have direct experience of these, obviously.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 22, 2016, 10:14 pm
Well, the Snapdragon in the DragonBoard doesn't use the big.LITTLE technology. It's 4 ARM Cortex-A53 cores clocked at 1.2GHz (low power). I agree with you on the big.LITTLE issues, especially in the case of ARM Cortex-A15 + ARM Cortex-A7 (power-hungry beast).
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 22, 2016, 10:18 pm
You'll get no sympathy from me
don't you like ADA? do you prefer Modula3? Rust?
I admit that ADA is not so friendly, but it's hardly used in Avionics, and that is my job
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 22, 2016, 10:19 pm
Isn't Ada a little bit outdated by now?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 22, 2016, 10:26 pm
Quote
don't you like ADA?
Ada looks like the bastard offspring of FORTRAN and Pascal - any language where you can't tell an array access from a function call sucks.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 22, 2016, 10:27 pm
Isn't Ada a little bit outdated by now?
nah, ADA supports concurrency as "language feature", so it's fine
while C is outdated with multicores approach because it does not support

however, if one is afraid of that (or if he/she doesn't like Ada)
there is another approach which allows to say on C++: NVIDIA® Jetson™ TX1!

see their kit (http://www.nvidia.com/object/jetson-tx1-dev-kit.html), it's awesome
I have bought one of these boards and it comes with a pretty support.

100% satisfied, even if I prefer Epiphany3
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 22, 2016, 10:29 pm
Isn't Ada a little bit outdated by now?
And C is a spring chicken?
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 22, 2016, 10:31 pm
I use C++ mainly, though I am currently learning C# as well.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 22, 2016, 10:33 pm
I admit that ADA is not so friendly, but it's hardly used in Avionics
I'm really surprised - I'd've thought avionics would be one of the ideal fields for Ada.
Maybe it went out of fashion after that Ariane rocket failed. . .

Quote
Quote
ADA supports concurrency as "language feature", so it's fine
So does occam  (it's "Ada" BTW, not "ADA")
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 22, 2016, 11:03 pm
I'm really surprised - I'd've thought avionics would be one of the ideal fields for Ada.
ops, I had forgot to specify "at the low level" (my job)
Avionics uses C for the low level (bsp, drivers, kernel)
and Ada for the user application space

while, once I have removed a few bloated features in GNAT
I can use Ada for the low level
and I am feeling fine with my Epiphany3 board :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 23, 2016, 04:54 pm
(https://www.imageupload.co.uk/images/2016/01/19/sandpoint-0.jpg)

PowerPC, 7445 (aka G4) professional development board
it comes with debug and performance-analyzer interfaces
plus a node locked license for VxWorks (by Windriver)
job purpose, payed just 1800 euro plus VAT & shipping
I was lucky :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 23, 2016, 05:42 pm
That thing's old!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 23, 2016, 05:48 pm
That thing's old!
definitely, I got a discount for that reason :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dmjlambert on Jan 23, 2016, 06:00 pm
Ok, so 1800 Euros +, that's equivalent to roughly two thousand US dollars, for an old G4-based computer from about 14 years ago, and that was a discount?  Just trying to comprehend. 
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: dally on Jan 23, 2016, 06:26 pm
that was a discount?  Just trying to comprehend. 
I need the above machine for Job purpose.

A brand new Windriver license costs 20.000 euro
including licences to unlock the BSP, VxWorks, debugger and performance analyzer

the above development board is currently in use in avionics
a few flight control boards unsed in aircraft are based on that board
even if, in some case case, you have to replace the 7445 with a 440/460 cpu module

in short, that's the reason why a recycler has kept them for sale,
instead of recycling parts, or putting the whole on flea-bay for a few bunks

mr.Newark has a few brand new kits, listed at 2500 euro + VAT + shipping
and they come with no license at all (in theory one can run linux on them)

I happen to already have a marvelous Windriver ICE (debugger + performance analyzer)
but its license is device-locked

so, I was in the need to acquire the hardware with a valid license to unlock Workbench
I am a freelancer, I have to pay in first person for my tools
if I can save money with them, I am happy :D
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 23, 2016, 10:55 pm
It's a wonder they still use such old hardware. Even a Raspberry Pi 2 would be an improvement in hardware while being only a tiny fraction of the cost!
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: AWOL on Jan 23, 2016, 10:59 pm
But a Raspberry Pi running PowerPC emulation would be pathetically slow.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: goodinventor on Jan 24, 2016, 12:24 am
In that case then you simply get something more powerful than the Raspberry Pi 2 but cheaper than the PowerPC system. An x64 system or an ARM Cortex-A57/A72 system would work.
Title: Re: Your latest purchase
Post by: westfw on Jan 24, 2016, 01:28 am
We had some PPC-based products that had some initial debugging and development done on G5 Mac Pros.
IIRC, there was some chortling about having picked up the Macs for only a couple hundred bucks each.
(no expensive SW licenses were involved; all open source unix and/or proprietary OS.)

(that "old hardware yields cheap SW" thing has become very real.  It's currently a bit cheaper to buy a used W7 PC (en