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Topic: Serial port software (Read 138 times) previous topic - next topic

aardweeno

Feb 14, 2019, 10:42 pm Last Edit: Feb 14, 2019, 11:13 pm by aardweeno Reason: formatting
I have created a little project, and I can communicate successfully with my Nano via the IDE's serial console. I can send commands and receive output.

I'd like to try communicating with different software. I've tried minicom, kermit and putty so far. I can't get any of them to work. I assume that my programming must be OK, because it responds correctly on the IDE console. I'm wondering if there's some "secret sauce" in the IDE that makes it work.

I'm connecting to /dev/ttyACM0, and a baud rate of 9600, which I'm pretty sure is correct. In putty, I've set data bits to 8, stop bits to 1, parity None, Flow Control XON/XOFF. Do those settings seem correct?

Puzzling.

Update: I think these packages I mentioned offer more facilities than I'm looking for. They do stuff like execute commands, send/receive files, etc., none of which is relevant to me. I even tried pyserial, which I couldn't get to work to my satisfaction, either. Anyway, it turns out that a simple script, like those featured at stackexchange  does the job.

Robin2

I use minicom as my standard terminal. I have several configuration files for different ports and different baudrates. This is the content of the one for ttyACMO at 9600 baud
Code: [Select]
# Machine-generated file - use setup menu in minicom to change parameters.
pu port             /dev/ttyACM0
pu baudrate         9600
pu bits             8
pu parity           N
pu stopbits         1

Don't mind the first line. All mine have been created manually

The Arduinos don't use any flow control.

...R
Two or three hours spent thinking and reading documentation solves most programming problems.

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