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Topic: Barn cleaning robot (Read 1 time) previous topic - next topic

bartdereu

Created a robot for barn cleaning. Driven by one Arduino UNO,  two
MD03 speedcontrollers, a I2C relay board etc..

wall following, end wall detection trough power measurement



keeper63

Looks neat - got any more info (how it's put together, code, schematics, etc) and/or pictures of how it works?
I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

RobRothman

But what does it do with the manure once it's finished cleaning out the barn? ???

Rob Rothman

bartdereu

#3
Oct 26, 2014, 07:43 pm Last Edit: Oct 27, 2014, 07:48 am by Coding Badly Reason: Link corrected
This machine is already 2 years old but still not went into production bc i had other
building projects that needed to be done. I'll try to find the schematics and upload
them. In mean time, here's what it's supposed to do :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MaZRc0f83oo


Moderator edit: link corrected

keeper63

This machine is already 2 years old but still not went into production bc i had other
building projects that needed to be done. I'll try to find the schematics and upload
them. In mean time, here's what it's supposed to do :
FYI - your link is broken (but I was able to watch the video).

It's more clear what it is doing with the video - basically squeegeeing the "grates" the cows stand on, right?

At the same time, to me, this solution seems somewhat inefficient - mainly in terms of cost. Unless the robot costs very little to the farmer, and has hardly any downtime, and can run as often as needed to automatically - I don't think it would be bought and used. Witness the fact that lawnmower robots have not exactly "taken off" (then again, that's a more difficult problem to solve effectively, which could be part of the reason).

I just don't see the advantage of this over a guy coming around every hour or so and quickly doing the job (maybe I am underestimating the size of the job). Also - is there a reason a hose and water couldn't be used (again by a person)? Quite often, people will say "Yeah, if this or that existed, it would be so much easier to buy it and use it, rather than having a person do it", then when something does come on the market, they balk at the cost and maintenance of it.

Inevitably, what they are mainly asking for is "It has to do the job, do it fast, cost very little money to buy and operate, and need no maintenance whatsoever" - and somehow, you as the developer and/or manufacturer have to be able to accommodate this while still turning a profit. For most things (and in the realm of robotics, this applies doubly) - that's a near impossibility at the present.

I will not respond to Arduino help PM's from random forum users; if you have such a question, start a new topic thread.

RobRothman

Quote
I just don't see the advantage of this over a guy coming around every hour or so and quickly doing the job (maybe I am underestimating the size of the job).
If I recall correctly, this type of job is big enough that Hercules had to do it as one of his twelve labors.  And he had to change the course of a river to do it!


Rob Rothman

cyberteque

I'm guessing this only works with fairly solid "lumps" and not what I affectionately like to call "flup".

I got excited when I saw this having had to clean out turkey barns with a skid steer loader and a Manitou.

The machines did a pretty good job, except you couldn't go right up to the edges, they had to be manually pulled away from the short wall and in the corners.

One barn was 300 feet long, the other was 360 feet long, I was always plotting to build something like this, but with an old ride on mower we found on the side of the road.

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